Category Archives: 7. semestar – SMJER PREVODITELJSTVO

Translation of Scientific and Academic Texts

Course title: Translation of Scientific and Academic Texts
Instructors
: Dr. Nataša Pavlović and Dr. Ivana Bašić
ECTS credits:
5
Status:
Mandatory
Semester:
1st
Enrollment requirements:
The students must be enrolled in the graduate program in English Language and Literature, Specialization in Translation.

Course description:
The course consists of four blocks. In each block, the students do individual and group translations of specialized texts from a different field. The fields covered include social sciences, humanities, and natural sciences. Texts are translated from English into Croatian and from Croatian into English (approx. 60/40).

The coursework is organized around authentic and simulated translation projects done partly in the virtual environment, on http://omega.ffzg.hr/ (Moodle). The students learn how to use printed and electronic resources to research the subject matter and build corpora and glossaries of terminology. For some fields they learn how to use translation memory systems. They also revise their own and each other’s translations, manage translation projects, cooperate with subject-matter experts and clients, and so on.

Objectives: By the end of the course the students should be able to translate, individually and in groups, various types of specialized texts. They should be able to identify translation problems in the text and to adopt strategies appropriate to the situation, the target readers, the client’s requirements, and so on. The students should also be able to use parallel texts to build their own glossaries of specialized terminology. They should be able to use search engines and online resources for terminology mining and subject-matter background reading. For some fields and text types, they should be able to work with translation memory systems. The students should also be able to do on-the-spot translations of short, relatively simple texts from the specialized areas dealt with in the course, without the help of aids other than their own glossaries of terminology.

Course requirements: Regular course attendance, regular submission of assignments, participation in the online forums as requested. Students get their final grade on the basis of their “portfolio” (collection of translations done during the course, both at home and in class, individually and in groups).

Week by week schedule:

Session Topics
1 Introduction. Course description, goals and requirements. Instructions for use of the online learning system (Moodle).
2-5 Social sciences: Sociology
6-9 Social sciences: Psychology
9-12 Natural sciences: Medicine
13-16 Humanities: Linguistics
17-21 Humanities: Art History
22-29 Humanities: Literary Studies
30 Student feedback, suggestions for future work

Reading:
Textbooks:
Baker, Mona.1992/2011. In Other Words. A Coursebook on Translation. London: Routledge
Nord, Christiane. 1997. Translating as a Purposeful Activity. Manchester: St. Jerome Publishing.

Handbook:
Hlavac, Jim and Veselica Majhut, Snježana. 2019. Translating from Croatian into English: A Handbook with Annotated Translations. Zagreb: Hrvatska sveučilišna naklada

Bilingual dictionaries, such as:
Bujas, Željko. Veliki hrvatsko-engleski rječnik. Zagreb: Nakladni zavod Globus
and Bujas, Željko. Veliki englesko-hrvatski rječnik. Zagreb: Nakladni zavod Globus
Grupa autora. Englesko-hrvatski rječnik. Zagreb: Školska knjiga

Monolingual dictionaries, such as:
Hornby, A. S. Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary. Oxford: Oxford University Press
Anić, V. Rječnik hrvatskoga jezika. Zagreb: Novi liber

Encyclopaedic dictionaries, such as:
The New Oxford Dictionary of English, or
Webster’s Third New International Dictionary, Unabridged
Anić, V. et al. Hrvatski enciklopedijski rječnik. Zagreb: Novi liber

Collocation dictionaries, such as:
Oxford Collocations Dictionary for Students of English. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Specialized dictionaries, such as:
Ivir, V. Hrvatsko-engleski poslovno-upravni rječnik. Zagreb: Školska knjiga.
Špiljak, V. Englesko-hrvatski poslovni rječnik. Zagreb: Masmedia.

Electronic resources

 

 

Translation and Intercultural Communication

Course title: Translation and Intercultural Communication
Instructor: Dr. Snježana Veselica Majhut
ECTS credits: 5
Language: English and Croatian
Semester: 1st and 3rd term of graduate studies
Status: elective
Form of instruction: two  lectures and one seminar per week + e-learning
Assessment: continuous assessment components (50 per cent)  and a term paper (50 per cent)

OBJECTIVES: After finishing this course the students should  be able to: detect underlying  socio-cultural components of a text and deploy strategies for their most appropriate transposition; analyze the intercultural components of a text in the light of theoretical models and concepts; analyze and deploy various strategies in order to translate a text in a manner that respects cultural conventions; justify translation choices while maintaining a critical distance.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course addresses the following themes: various concepts of culture and their relevance for translation; intercultural competence; applicability of functionalist approaches to translation; text types and genres; culture-specific features of text types and their implications for translation; analysis of concrete text types; the impact of the implied reader on the translator’s decisions; coherence and cohesion of the source and target text.

MODE OF INSTRUCTION:
The course combines lectures and seminar work (2+1). The students are expected to read the literature before the lectures and participate in seminar discussions (both in class and in the virtual environment on http://omega.ffzg.hr/ (Moodle). The students are also expected to apply the acquired knowledge in assessed written assignments (analysis of the selected aspects of source and targets texts, commentaries on the advantages and disadvantages of certain strategies in particular communicative situations, etc.) and a term paper.  

COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND ASSESSMENT:
Regular attendance, preparedness for class, active participation in class and in e-learning, regular submission of assessed assignments. The final grade is based on the continuous assessment of particular course elements (attendance, active participation in class and in e-learning, timely submission of assessed assignments) and the term  paper.

OBLIGATORY READING:
Gambier, Y. 2013. “Genres, text-types and translation” in Handbook of Translation Studies. vol. 4: pp. 63–69

Hatim, B. 2009. “ Translating text in context“ in Munday, J. (ed.) The Routledge Companion to Translation Studies. New York: Routledge.

Hatim, B. and Munday, J. 2004. Translation: An Advanced Resource Book. New York: Routledge. (selected chapters)

Kelly, D. 1998.  “The translation of texts from the tourist sector: textual conventions, cultural distance and other constraints”.Trans: Revista de Traductologia. no. 2 (1998)
(DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24310/TRANS.1998.v0i2.2354

Trosborg, A. (ed.) 1997. Text Typology and Translation. John Benjamins Publishing (selected chapters)

ADDITIONAL READING:
Hatim, B. and Mason, I. 2005. The Translator as Communicator. London/New York: Routledge

Katan, D. 2009. “Translation as Intercultural Communication” in in Munday, J. (ed.) The Routledge Companion to Translation Studies. New York: Routledge.

Katan, D. Translating Cultures: An Introduction for Translators, Interpreters and Mediators https://www.academia.edu/7397391/14818510

Nord, C.  2000.  “Training Functional Translators”. Cadernos de Tradução.  ISSN 2175-7968, Florianópolis, Brasil.DOI: https://doi.org/10.5007/%25x

Tomozeiu, D., Koskinen, K. and D’Arcangelo, A. 2017.  (eds.)  Intercultural Competence for Translators. New York: Routledge (selected chapter ).

 

WEEK BY WEEK SCHEDULE

Week Topic
1 Introduction. Various concepts of culture and their relevance for translators. Discussion.
2 Intercultural competence. The importance of intercultural competence for translators.
3 The main principles of functionalist approaches to translation.
4 Applicability of functionalist approaches to concrete translation tasks.
5 Text types and genres.
6 Text coherence and cohesion.
7 Consolidation.
8 Culture-specific features of text types.
9 Culture-specific features of text types.
10 Analysis of text-type norms and conventions  in tourist brochures.
11 Analysis of strategies of translating “realia” in selected text types.
12 Analysis of text-type norms and conventions  in culinary texts.  
13 Analysis of text-type norms and conventions  in self-help literature.
14 Consolidation.
15 Feedback on term papers. Student feedback on the course.

 

 

Translation of Scientific and Academic Texts (archive)

Course title: Translation of Scientific and Academic Texts (2018/19)
Instructors
: Dr. Nataša Pavlović and Dr. Snježana Veselica Majhut
ECTS credits:
5
Status:
Mandatory
Semester:
1st
Enrollment requirements:
The students must be enrolled in the graduate program in English Language and Literature, Specialization in Translation.

Course description:
The course consists of four blocks. In each block, the students do individual and group translations of specialized texts from a different field. The fields covered include social sciences, humanities, and natural sciences. Texts are translated from English into Croatian and from Croatian into English (approx. 60/40).

The coursework is organized around authentic and simulated translation projects done partly in the virtual environment, on http://omega.ffzg.hr/ (Moodle). The students learn how to use printed and electronic resources to research the subject matter and build corpora and glossaries of terminology. For some fields they learn how to use translation memory systems. They also revise their own and each other’s translations, manage translation projects, cooperate with subject-matter experts and clients, and so on.

Objectives: By the end of the course the students should be able to translate, individually and in groups, various types of specialized texts. They should be able to identify translation problems in the text and to adopt strategies appropriate to the situation, the target readers, the client’s requirements, and so on. The students should also be able to use parallel texts to build their own glossaries of specialized terminology. They should be able to use search engines and online resources for terminology mining and subject-matter background reading. For some fields and text types, they should be able to work with translation memory systems. The students should also be able to do on-the-spot translations of short, relatively simple texts from the specialized areas dealt with in the course, without the help of aids other than their own glossaries of terminology.

Course requirements: Regular course attendance, regular submission of assignments, participation in the online forums as requested. Students get their final grade on the basis of their “portfolio” (collection of translations done during the course, both at home and in class, individually and in groups).

 Week by week schedule:

Session Topics
1 Introduction. Course description, goals and requirements. Instructions for use of the online learning system (Moodle).
2-5 Social sciences: Sociology
6-9 Social sciences: Psychology
9-12 Natural sciences: Medicine
13-16 Humanities: Linguistics
17-21 Humanities: Art History
22-29 Humanities: Literary Studies
30 Student feedback, suggestions for future work

Reading:
Textbooks:
Nord, Christiane. 1997. Translating as a Purposeful Activity. Manchester: St. Jerome Publishing.
Baker, Mona.1992. In Other Words. A Coursebook on Translation. London: Routledge

Bilingual dictionaries, such as:
Bujas, Željko. Veliki hrvatsko-engleski rječnik. Zagreb: Nakladni zavod Globus
and Bujas, Željko. Veliki englesko-hrvatski rječnik. Zagreb: Nakladni zavod Globus
Grupa autora. Englesko-hrvatski rječnik. Zagreb: Školska knjiga

Monolingual dictionaries, such as:
Hornby, A. S. Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary. Oxford: Oxford University Press
Anić, V. Rječnik hrvatskoga jezika. Zagreb: Novi liber

Encyclopaedic dictionaries, such as:
The New Oxford Dictionary of English, or
Webster’s Third New International Dictionary, Unabridged
Anić, V. et al. Hrvatski enciklopedijski rječnik. Zagreb: Novi liber

Collocation dictionaries, such as:
Oxford Collocations Dictionary for Students of English. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Specialized dictionaries, such as:
Ivir, V. Hrvatsko-engleski poslovno-upravni rječnik. Zagreb: Školska knjiga.
Špiljak, V. Englesko-hrvatski poslovni rječnik. Zagreb: Masmedia.

Electronic resources

 

 

Translation Theory

Course title: Translation Theory
Instructor
: Dr. Nataša Pavlović
ECTS credits:
6
Status:
Mandatory for translation students, elective for others
Semester:
1st
Enrollment requirements:
Students must be enrolled in a graduate program at the University of Zagreb.
Course description:
The course deals with the following topics: translation theory/theories, Translation Studies; different conceptualizations of translation and translators through history; types of translation (and interpreting); translators’ tools and resources; terminology and special languages; translation equivalence; translation shifts and strategies; text, co-text, context; register, genre, discourse; the seven standards of textuality; intertextuality; Grice’s maxims; norms and translation; functionalist approaches (skopos theory); the “cultural turn” in TS (cultural studies, gender studies, post-colonial studies, deconstruction); translation ethics; literary translation; translation for the audiovisual media.
The course combines lectures and seminar work (3+1). Students also do assignments (e.g. forum discussions) in the virtual environment, on http://omega.ffzg.hr/ (Moodle).

Objectives: By the end of the course the students should be familiar with contemporary translation theories and current trends in Translation Studies. They should master the metalanguage and acquire the conceptual repertoire needed to discuss a wide range of issues associated with the phenomenon of translation. They should be able to apply the theoretical insights gained from the course to examples from everyday translation practice.

Course requirements: Regular course attendance, participation in the online forums as requested, final written exam.

 Week-by-week schedule:

Session Topics
1 Introduction. Translation theories and Translation Studies.
2 What is translation? Who are translators?
3 Types of translation (and interpreting)
4, 5 , 6, 7, 8 Translators’ tools and resources
9, 10 Terminology and specialized languages
11, 12 Non-correspondences between languages (contrastive analysis)
13, 14 Equivalence
15, 16 Translation procedures and strategies
17, 18, 19 From words to text: How can text linguistics, pragmatics and discourse analysis help translators? (Text, co-text, context; register, genre, discourse; seven standards of textuality; Grice’s maxims)
20, 21 Functionalist approaches to translation: skopos theory.
22, 23 Norms and translation. Polysystem theory.
24, 25 The “cultural turn” in Translation Studies (Lefevere, gender studies, post-colonial studies, Venuti)
26 Translation ethics
27 Literary translation (guest translator).
28 AVT. Main issues in subtitling (guest subtitler).
29 Interpreting (guest interpreter)
30 Revision; student feedback; suggestions for future work

 

Reading:

Pavlović, Nataša. 2015. Uvod u teorije prevođenja. Zagreb: Leykam international

Baker, Mona. 1998/2001. Routledge Encyclopedia of Translation Studies. London i New York: Routledge.

Bowker, Lynne et al. (eds.). 1998. Unity and Diversity. Current Trends in Translation Studies. St. Jerome Publishing Ltd.

Ivir, Vladimir. 1984. Teorija i tehnika prevođenja. Novi Sad: Centar “Karlovačka gimnazija” Sremski Karlovci, Zavod za izdavanje udžbenika u Novom Sadu.

Munday, Jeremy. 2001. Introducing Translation Studies. Theories and Applications. London i New York: Routledge.

Qvale, Per. 2003. From St. Jerome to Hypertext. Manchester: St. Jerome Publishing.

Venuti, Lawrence (ur.). 2000. The Translation Studies Reader. London i New York: Routledge.

Articles and presentations available on http://omega.ffzg.hr/

 

 

Translation of Scientific and Academic Texts (arch.)

Course title: Translation of Scientific and Academic Texts
Instructors
: Dr. Nataša Pavlović and Dr. Snježana Veselica Majhut
ECTS credits:
5
Status:
Mandatory
Semester:
7th
Enrollment requirements:
The students must be enrolled in the graduate program in English Language and Literature, Specialization in Translation.

Course description:
The course consists of four blocks. In each block the students translate specialized texts from a different field. The first three blocks deal with selected texts from the fields of social sciences, humanities, and natural sciences. The final block is dedicated to texts from the area of business and economics. The translations are done from English into Croatian and from Croatian into English (approx. 60/40).
The coursework is organized around projects that the students do in groups, partly in the virtual environment, on http://omega.ffzg.hr/ (Moodle). The students learn how to use printed and electronic resources to research the subject matter and build corpora and glossaries of terminology. They also revise their own and each other’s translations, manage translation projects, cooperate with subject-matter experts and clients, and so on.
Objectives: By the end of the course the students should be able to translate, individually and in groups, texts similar to those dealt with in the course. They should be able to identify translation problems in the text and to adopt strategies appropriate to the situation, the target readers, the client’s requirements, and so on. The students should also be able to use parallel texts to build their own glossaries of specialized terminology. They should be able to use search engines and online resources for terminology mining and subject-matter background reading. The students should also be able to do on-the-spot translations of short, relatively simple texts from the specialized areas dealt with in the course, without the help of aids other than their own glossaries of terminology.

Course requirements: Regular course attendance, regular submission of assignments, participation in the online forums as requested. Students get their final grade on the basis of their “portfolio” (collection of translations done during the course, both at home and in class, individually and in groups).

 Week by week schedule:

Session Topics
1 Introduction. Course description, goals and requirements. Instructions for use of the online learning system (Moodle).
2-7 Social sciences: Sociology
8,9,10 Natural sciences: Medicine
11,12,13 Humanities: Linguistics
14-19 Humanities: Art History
20-28 Business and economics
29 Revision
30 Student feedback, suggestions for future work

 Reading:
Textbooks:

Nord, Christiane. 1997. Translating as a Purposeful Activity. Manchester: St. Jerome Publishing.
Baker, Mona.1992. In Other Words. A Coursebook on Translation. London: Routledge

Bilingual dictionaries, such as:
– Bujas, Željko. Veliki hrvatsko-engleski rječnik. Zagreb: Nakladni zavod Globus
and Bujas, Željko. Veliki englesko-hrvatski rječnik. Zagreb: Nakladni zavod Globus
– Grupa autora. Englesko-hrvatski rječnik. Zagreb: Školska knjiga

Monolingual dictionaries, such as:
Hornby, A. S. Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary. Oxford: Oxford University Press
Anić, V. Rječnik hrvatskoga jezika. Zagreb: Novi liber

 Encyclopaedic dictionaries, such as:
The New Oxford Dictionary of English, or
Webster’s Third New International Dictionary, Unabridged
Anić, V. et al. Hrvatski enciklopedijski rječnik. Zagreb: Novi liber

Collocation dictionaries, such as:
Oxford Collocations Dictionary for Students of English. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Specialized dictionaries, such as:
Ivir, V. Hrvatsko-engleski poslovno-upravni rječnik. Zagreb: Školska knjiga.
Špiljak, V. Englesko-hrvatski poslovni rječnik. Zagreb: Masmedia.

Electronic resources

 

Idiomatic and Stylistic Features of the Croatian Language

Course title: Idiomatic and Stylistic Features of the Croatian Language
Course coordinator:
Prof. Anita Peti-Stantić, Department of South Slavic Languages and Literatures
Instructors:
Prof. Anita Peti-Stantić, Dr. Ivana Bašić
ECTS credits: 5
Language:
Croatian
Duration:
1 semester (winter)
Status:
mandatory
Form of instruction:
two contact hours of lecture and two contact hours of seminar
Enrollment requirements:
The students must be enrolled in the 1st semester of graduate studies.
Exam:
written
Course description:
The students will improve their knowledge of Croatian normative grammar and orthography, as well as become familiar with functional styles and their features and markers in contemporary Croatian language. They will be able to make subtle distinctions in the use of language resources and linguistic devices in accordance with the requirements of specific functional styles and the communication situation as a whole.
Objectives: 
To enable the students to gain knowledge of stylistics, normative grammar, orthography, pragmatics and semantics. To contribute to the development of their communication competence in Croatian and to the adoption of principles applicable in communication in other languages.

Reading:
ORTHOGRAPHIC MANUALS:
1. Babić, S.-Finka, B.-Moguš, M. (1996) Hrvatski pravopis. Zagreb: Školska knjiga.
2. Hrvatski pravopis (2007) Badurina, L., Marković, I., Mićanović, K. Zagreb: Matica hrvatska.

GRAMMAR BOOKS:
1. Barić, E. – Lončarić, M. – Malić, D. – Pavešić, S. – Peti, M. – Zečević, M. – Znika, M. (1995) Hrvatska gramatika. Zagreb: Školska knjiga.
2. Silić, J. and Pranjković, I. (2005) Gramatika hrvatskoga jezika: za gimnazije i visoka uilišta. Zagreb: Školska knjiga.

DICTIONARIES:
1. Anić, V. (1991) Rjenik hrvatskoga jezika. Zagreb: Novi liber.
2. Hrvatski enciklopedijski rjenik (2002) Matasović, R. et al. Zagreb: Novi Liber.

OTHER:
1. Hrvatski jezini savjetnik. ur. Hudeček, L.-Mihaljević, M.-Vukojević, L. (1999). Zagreb: Institut za hrvatski jezik i jezikoslovlje-Pergamena-Školske novine.
2. Hrvatski jezik u XX. stoljeu (2006) ed. Hekman, J. Zagreb: Matica hrvatska.

OPTIONAL READING:
1. Kovačević, M.-Badurina, L. (2001) Raslojavanje jezine stvarnosti. Rijeka: Izdavački centar.
2. Silić, J. (2006) Funkcionalni stilovi hrvatskoga jezika. Zagreb: Disput.
3. Škiljan, D. (2000) Javni jezik. Zagreb: Izdanja Antibarbarus.

COURSE SCHEDULE

TOPICS:

  1. Space and time in language: a single language ~ several languages, geographic space ~ virtual space, astronomical time ~ virtual time, changes in language.
  2. Sociolinguistic approaches to language phenomena exemplified by different language situations.
  3. Croatian language as a system. Standard Croatian language. Standard language norms.
  4. Norms and normization. Normative handbooks. Orthographic manuals and dictionaries. The relationship between the orthographic manuals, grammar books and dictionaries.  Advisory handbooks. Discussion on language politics and self-censorship.
  5. Standard and non-standard forms of language use. Analysis of specific problems (i.e. the relation between stylistically marked and unmarked lexemes, loanwords and internationalism, sequence of tenses, word order, and etc.).
  6. Public language. Responsibility in public language. Theses on the relation between the public and private language, with special emphasis on the areas of standard language use, mostly related to the functions of public language. The issue of responsibility towards the public word, and the issue of the status of standard language.
  7. Official language and its place in public communication. Discussion on the relation between the public and official language – bills, public statements (politicians, actors, artists, spokespersons).
  8. Stratification of language. Each functional style necessary for the understanding and using standard language on the academic level (scientific, journalistic, and administrative and business style) will be dealt with separately, with special focus on the language of the media and the form and structure of scientific and professional papers. Mandatory and optional language editing.

 

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