Category Archives: 9. semestar – SMJER LINGVISTIKA

Syntactic Theories

Course title: Syntactic Theories
Course coordinator: Irena Zovko Dinković, PhD, associate professor
Instructor: Irena Zovko Dinković, PhD, associate professor
Status: elective
ECTS credits: 6
Semester: 1st or 3rd (winter)
Enrollment requirements:

Objectives: To introduce the students to major syntactic theories and approaches from the beginning of the 20th century to the present, and teach them about various ways of syntactic analysis and representation, as well as claims and hypotheses on the structure of language in general. This will provide them with the opportunity to apply the acquired theoretical background to their own research and connect it on a broader level with other sciences.

Week by week schedule:

Week Topic
1. Introduction to the history of 20th century syntactic theories.
2. From Bloomfield to Chomsky. Early generative theories.
3. Chomsky’s Transformational Grammar. Standard Theory and Extended Standard Theory.
4. Generative Semantics. Optimality theories: Generalized Phrase Structure Grammar.
5. Head-driven Phrase Structure Grammar. Lexical Functional Grammar.
6. Government and Binding Theory and X’- theory. Minimalist Program.
7. Relational Grammar. Dependency Grammars.
8. Functional approaches to language analysis. The Prague Linguistic Circle.
9. Martinet’s Functional Syntax.
10. S. Dik’s Functional Grammar and Functional Discourse Grammar.
11. Systemic Functional Grammar.
12. Role and Reference Grammar. Emergent Grammar.
13. Cognitive Grammar.
14. Construction Grammar.
15. Final review and preparation for the exam.

Course description:
After each unit, the students solve a specific task in the seminar, which they check with the instructor. They are also expected to read at home the relevant parts of obligatory reading and other materials.

Course requirements:
Students should attend the classes regularly and actively participate in class and in solving the assignments. The last week of the course is dedicated to preparing students for the exam. The exam is written.

Obligatory reading (selected chapters and pages):
Brown, Keith & Miller, J. (ur.) (1996). Concise Encyclopedia of Syntactic Theories. Oxford – New York: Pergamon

Moravcsik, Edith (2006). An Introduction to Syntactic Theory. New York: Continuum

Newmeyer, Frederick (1986). Linguistic Theory in America (2. izd.). Orlando: Academic Press, Inc.

Matthews, Peter H. (1993). Grammatical Theory in the United States from Bloomfield to Chomsky. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

Sag, Ivan, Wasow, Thomas & Bender, Emily (2003). Syntactic Theory: A Formal Introduction (2. izdanje). Chicago: CSLI Publications

 

 

Suggested reading:
Chomsky, Noam (1957). Syntactic Structures. Gravenhage: Mouton

Graffi, Giorgio (2001). 200 Years of Syntax: A Critical Survey. Amsterdam; Philadelphia: John Benjamins

Müller, Stefan (2016). Grammatical theory: From transformational grammar to constraint-based approaches. Berlin: Language Science Press

Poole, Geoffrey (2011). Syntactic Theory (2. izd.). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan

Sells, Peter (1985). Lectures on Contemporary Syntactic Theories. Chicago: CSLI Publications

Pollock, Jean-Yves (1989). Verb Movement, Universal Grammar, and the Structure of IP. Linguistic Inquiry 20: 365-424

Nichols, Johanna (1984). Functional Theories of Grammar. Annual Review of Anthropology 13: 97–117.

Newmeyer, Frederick. (2001). The Prague School and North American functionalist approaches to syntax. Journal of Linguistics 37: 101 – 126

Dik, Simon C. (1991). Functional Grammar. U: F. Droste i J. Joseph (ur.), Linguistic theory and grammatical description. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins

Hengeveld, Kees & Mackenzie, J. Lachlan (2010), Functional Discourse Grammar. U: Bernd Heine i Heiko Narrog (ur.), The Oxford Handbook of Linguistic Analysis. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 367-400.

Halliday, M. A. K. (1984). A Short Introduction to Functional Grammar. London: Arnold

Van Valin, Robert D., Jr. & Randy LaPolla (1997). Syntax: Structure, meaning and function. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Langacker, Ronald W. (2008). Cognitive Grammar: A Basic Introduction. New York: Oxford University Press.

Goldberg, Adele. (1995) Constructions: A Construction Grammar Approach to Argument Structure. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Sociolinguistics (L)

Course title: Sociolinguistics
Course coordinator: Dr. Anđel Starčević, Assistant Professor
Instructor: Dr. Anđel Starčević, Assistant Professor
ECTS credits : 5
Language: English
Semester: 3rd (winter) (linguistics program)
Form of instruction: 2 lectures + 2 seminars
Enrollment requirements: enrollment in the third semester
Exam: written

Course description: The course conceptualizes language as a process and a frame for various realizations or varieties, such as standard and non-standard dialects, sociolects, styles and jargons. It deals with describing and interpreting their functions in specific communities, as well as with the explicit and implicit metapragmatic levels of various language ideologies, which are an integral component of language use, often with important social consequences. The course is taught through lectures and seminar discussions, with an emphasis on individual work. For their weekly seminar work, students need to pre-read the assigned texts and be prepared to critically discuss them. During the semester, each student will (1) present one seminar topic based on one of the assigned texts and formulate questions for discussion with the class, as well as (2) carry out, write up and (in the second half of the semester) present their own research project in the form of a research paper. The research paper includes carrying out one sociolinguistic interview, transcribing the material, and analyzing the data with references to relevant literature. The final grade in the course is a combination of the results of a written final exam (60%) and the research paper (40%).      
Course objectives: Enabling students to understand the link between linguistic and extralinguistic phenomena, the interplay between the communicative and symbolic levels of language, and the role of language in creating ideological views. Developing the ability to critically consider prevalent ideas on language and language variability. Developing methodological and analytical skills for autonomous sociolinguistic research.

Week-by-week schedule:
1. Sociolinguistics as a branch of linguistics. Langue and parole, competence and performance versus communicative competence. Language, dialect, variety.
2. Language ideologies and Critical Discourse Analysis.
3. The sociolinguistic interview.
4. Language and social class.
5. Language and ethnicity.
6. Language and gender.
7. Language varieties in context. Style and registers. Slang.
8. REVISION 1
9. Politeness and power in language.
10. Language and geography. Traditional dialectology. Innovations across language barriers.
11. Languages in contact 1. Code-switching. Croanglish/hrengleski.
12. Languages in contact 2. Pidgins and creoles.
13. Language policy and planning.
14. Language and ‘new social sensibilities’. Language discrimination, racism and sexism. Political correctness.
15. REVISION 2
Required reading:
Trudgill, Peter (2000) Sociolinguistics: An Introduction to Language and Society. (4th edition). London/New York: Penguin.
Llamas Carmen, Mullany Louise and Peter Stockwell (eds) (2007) The Routledge Companion to Sociolinguistics. London/New York: Routledge. (selected chapters)
Wardhaugh, Ronald and Janet M. Fuller (2015) Introduction to Sociolinguistics. (7th edition). Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell.
Suggested reading:
Hudson, Richard (1996) Sociolinguistics. (2nd edition). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Romaine, Suzanne (2007) Language and Society. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Stockwell, Peter (2007) Sociolinguistics: A Resource Book for Students. (2nd edition). London/New York: Routledge.

 

Historical Sociolinguistics

Name of course: Historical sociolinguistics
Instructor:
Dr. Alexander D. Hoyt, senior lector (lecturer in foreign languages)
ECTS points:
5
Language of instruction:
English
Classroom hours weekly:
lecture: 1 seminar: 2
Semester:
Winter /or Summer
Status:
elective course
Maximum enrolment:
20 students

Course description: The goals of this course are twofold. The first goal is to introduce students to the field of historical sociolinguistics, in which scholars studying the history of individual languages combine the methods of historical linguistics with those of sociolinguistics (especially variationist, or “Labovian”, sociolinguistics) in an attempt to reconstruct processes of language change in their social context. Research in this field tends to focus on texts that most closely represent spoken language (e.g., personal letters, theatrical plays, and court testimony transcriptions). The majority of historical sociolinguistic research has been done on Early Modern English, the largest project by far being the Corpus of Early English Correspondence (CEEC), a Finnish project headed by Terttu Nevalainen. Most other research in the field has been done on northern European languages such as Swedish, German, Dutch, and French. The second goal is to give students some “hands-on” experience. They will be shown how a completed digital corpus (e.g., the CEEC) can be used for basic research. In addition, students will participate in the construction of a sociolinguistic corpus by transcribing and analyzing personal letters written (or received) in Croatia in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Although the primary focus of this project is linguistic, students specializing in other fields, such as history, sociology, communications, and political science, should also find the course interesting from the socio-historical point of view, because the letters studied will give them insight into the everyday problems and experiences of people living in Croatia a century ago.
Grading method: The final grade is based on continuous assessment, which includes regular attendance, preparation for and participation in class, and timely submission of both an informal group report (2-4 students) and an individual term paper. the paper is worth 40% of the final grade; the group report, 30%; and other elements of continuous assessment, 30%. Students must fulfill all elements of continuous assessment in order to pass the course.
Course units:
12.10.15 Introduction to the course.
19.10.15 What is historical sociolinguistics? Origins of the field.
26.10.15 Source Types Used in Historical Sociolinguistic Inquiry
2.11.15 Corpus of Early English Correspondence (CEEC)
9.11.15 Letters as Loot Corpus (Dutch sailing letters)
16.11.15 Social History and Language Change.
30.11.15 Language and Dialect. English, Croatian, other examples
7.12.15 Standardization. Two examples: English and Croatian
14.12.15 Different Ways of Looking at Language Change
21.12.15 The Uniformitarian Principle
11.1.16 Linguistic and Social Variables
18.1.16 Social Networks
25.1.16 Conclusion
Required reading:
– Hernandez Campoy, Juan M. & J. Camilo Conde Silvestre (eds.). 2012. The Handbook of Historical Sociolinguistics. Wiley-Blackwell.
Secondary reading:
– Barton, David & Hall, Nigel (eds.). 1999. Letter writing as a social practice (Studies in Written Language and Literacy 9). Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins.
– Brozović, Dalibor i Pavle Ivić (1988), Jezik, srpskohrvatski/hrvatskosrpski, hrvatski ili srpski. Zagreb: Jugoslavenski i leksikografski zavod “Miroslav Krleža”.
– Lass, Roger. 1997. Historical linguistics and language change. (Cambridge Studies in Linguistics 81). Cambridge: C.U.P.
– Milan Moguš. 1995. A History of the Croatian Language: Toward a Common Standard. Zagreb: Nakladni zavod Globus. Translated by Alexander D. Hoyt & Lelija Sočanac.
– Nevalainen, Terttu & Raumolin-Brunberg, Helena (eds.). 1996. Sociolinguistics and language history: Studies based on the Corpus of Early English Correspondence (Language and Computers: Studies in Practical Linguistics 15). Amsterdam – Atlanta, GA: Rodopi.
– Nevalainen, Terttu & Raumolin-Brunberg, Helena. 2003. Historical sociolinguistics: Language Change in Tudor and Stuart England. London: Pearson Education.
– Nevalainen, Terttu & Tanskanen, Sanna-Kaisa (eds.). Letter writing (Benjamins Current Topics 1). Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins. [previously published in the Journal of Historical Pragmatics, 5:2 (2004)]
– Romaine, Suzanne. 1982. Socio-historical linguistics: Its status and methodology (Cambridge Studies in Linguistics 34). Cambridge: C.U.P.

 

Pragmatics-archive

Course title: Pragmatics
Instructor: Mateusz-Milan Stanojević
ECTS credits: 5
Language: English
Semester: 9th (winter)
Status: elective
Form of Instruction: 1 lecture + 2 seminars per week
Examination: written
Course description: This course deals with various issues in pragmatics, such as illocution and perlocution, various types of communicative interaction, speech acts, text functions, etc., with special emphasis on their relevance in the translation process.
Objectives: The aim of this course is for the students to acquire basic theoretical competences in pragmatics, and skills to recognize pragmatic issues in practice. This will enable them to develop skills to recognize various pragmatic notions in stretches of speech, and deal with them in translation.

Week Topic
1 Introduction, syllabus, definition of pragmatics
2 Functions of language. The goals of translation.
3 Context and background knowledge: general issues. Cultural differences and translation: examples.
4 Context and background knowledge in written and spoken texts: presupposition. A cultural view of presupposition in translation.
5 Context and background knowledge: cohesion and coherence. Manipulating cohesion and coherence for pragmatic effect.
6 Context and background knowledge: deixis. Social deixis and the T/V distinction in Croatian and English. Translational issues.
7 Politeness. Positive and negative face. Differences between Croatian and English. Translational issues.
8 Revision
9 Speech acts: background. Felicity conditions. Possible consequences for translation.
10 Speech acts and society. A cross-cultural view: finding differences between English and Croatian.
11 The cooperative principle: background. Theory and examples of maxims. Flouting and violating maxims.
12 The cooperative principle: examples and their translation.
13 Textual differences: achieving pragmatic effect in different types of text. Pragmatic effect and functions of language: recognition and translation. Examples, discussion, problems.
14 Discourse analysis, pragmatics and culture. The translator as a cultural mediator.
15 Revision.

 

Historical Sociolinguistics (archive)

Name of course: Historical sociolinguistics
Instructor:
Dr. Alexander D. Hoyt, senior lector (lecturer in foreign languages)
ECTS points:
5
Language of instruction:
English
Classroom hours weekly:
lecture: 1  seminar: 2
Semester:
Winter 2012/13
Status:
elective course
Maximum enrolment:
20 students

Course description: The goals of this course are twofold. The first goal is to introduce students to the field of historical sociolinguistics, in which scholars studying the history of individual languages combine the methods of historical linguistics with those of sociolinguistics (especially variationist, or “Labovian”, sociolinguistics) in an attempt to reconsruct processes of language change in their social context. Research in this field tends to focus on texts that most closely represent spoken language (e.g., personal letters, theatrical plays, and court testimony transcriptions). The majority of historical sociolinguistic research has been done on Early Modern English, the largest project by far being the Corpus of Early English Correspondence (CEEC), a Finnish project headed by Terttu Nevalainen. Most other research in the field has been done on northern European languages such as Swedish, German, Dutch, and French. The second goal is to give students some “hands-on” experience. They will be shown how a completed digital corpus (e.g., the CEEC) can be used for basic research. In addition, students will participate in the construction of a sociolinguistic corpus by transcribing and analyzing personal letters written (or received) in Croatia in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Although the primary focus of this project is linguistic, students specializing in other fields, such as history, sociology, communications, and political science, should also find the course interesting from the socio-historical point of view, because the letters studied will give them insight into the everyday problems and experiences of people living in Croatia a century ago.

Grading method: The final grade is based on continuous assessment, which includes regular attendance, preparation for and participation in class, and timely submission of both a group report (4 students) and an individual term paper. the paper is worth 40% of the final grade; the group report, 30%; and other elements of continuous assessment, 30%. Students must fulfill all elements of continuous assessment in order to pass the course.

Course units:

1. Introduction and description of course requirements
2. Synchrony and diachrony
3. Historical sociolinguistics: beginnings and general goals
4. Applying contemporary sociolinguistic methods to data from the past
5. The role of the linguistic corpus in studies of linguistic variation
6. Private letters and old newspapers as sources for historical sociolinguistic analysis
7. Other written sources for historical sociolinguistic analysis
8. Orthographic variables
9. Phonological variables
10. Grammatical variables
11. Lexical-semantic variables
12. The influence of class, age, and gender on linguistic variation
13. Social networks and mobility in relation to linguistic variation
14. Internally and externally motivated language change
15. Presentations of student research

Required reading:
– Hernandez Campoy, Juan M. & J. Camilo Conde Silvestre (eds.). 2012. The Handbook of Historical Sociolinguistics. Wiley-Blackwell.

Secondary reading:
– Barton, David & Hall, Nigel (eds.). 1999. Letter writing as a social practice (Studies in Written Language and Literacy 9). Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins.
– Brozović, Dalibor i Pavle Ivić (1988), Jezik, srpskohrvatski/hrvatskosrpski, hrvatski ili srpski. Zagreb: Jugoslavenski i leksikografski zavod “Miroslav Krleža”.
– Lass, Roger. 1997. Historical linguistics and language change. (Cambridge Studies in Linguistics 81). Cambridge: C.U.P.
– Milan Moguš. 1995. A History of the Croatian Language: Toward a Common Standard. Zagreb: Nakladni zavod Globus. Translated by Alexander D. Hoyt & Lelija Sočanac.
– Nevalainen, Terttu & Raumolin-Brunberg, Helena (eds.). 1996. Sociolinguistics and language history: Studies based on the Corpus of Early English Correspondence (Language and Computers: Studies in Practical Linguistics 15). Amsterdam – Atlanta, GA: Rodopi.
– Nevalainen, Terttu & Raumolin-Brunberg, Helena. 2003. Historical sociolinguistics: Language Change in Tudor and Stuart England. London: Pearson Education.
– Nevalainen, Terttu & Tanskanen, Sanna-Kaisa (eds.). Letter writing (Benjamins Current Topics 1). Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins. [previously published in the Journal of Historical Pragmatics, 5:2 (2004)]
– Romaine, Suzanne. 1982. Socio-historical linguistics: Its status and methodology (Cambridge Studies in Linguistics 34). Cambridge: C.U.P.

 

 

 

Pragmatics

Course title: Pragmatics
Instructor: Dr. Mateusz-Milan Stanojević
ECTS credits: 5
Language: English
Semester: 3rd (winter) term of graduate studies
Status: elective
Form of Instruction: 1 lecture + 2 seminars per week
Examination: written
Course description: This course deals with issues in pragmatics, particularly locution, various types of communicational interaction, speech acts, text functions, deixis and the relationship between pragmatics, semantics and syntax. Some areas are illustrated with examples of recent research in pragmatics. Particular emphasis is given to student participation and finding everyday examples of pragmatic phenomena.
Objectives: The
aim of this course is to enable students to acquire the basic pragmalinguistic notions on the theoretical and practical level. Upon the completion of the course, the students will be able to read pragmatic research, will be able to set up basic pragmatic research and will be able to recognize a variety of pragmatic phenomena in everyday communication, which can serve as the basis of reflection on their own communicative skills.

Literature:
Compulsory:
Huang, Yan. 2007. Pragmatics. Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press.
– Cutting, J. 2008. Pragmatics and Discourse: A Resource Book for Students. 2nd ed. London and New York: Routledge.

Additional:
Austin, J.L. (1962) How to Do Things with Words, Cambridge, Massachusetts
– Levinson, Stephen C. 1983. Pragmatics. Cambridge, New York, Melbourne: Cambridge University Press.
– Ivanetić, N. (1994) Govorni činovi, Zavod za lingvistiku, Zagreb
Searle, J.R. (1969) Speech Acts. An Essay in the Philosophy of Language, Cambridge

Week Topic
1 Introduction, syllabus, definition of pragmatics
2 Functions of language. The goals of translation.
3 Context and background knowledge: general issues. Cultural differences and translation: examples.
4 Context and background knowledge in written and spoken texts: presupposition. A cultural view of presupposition in translation.
5 Context and background knowledge: cohesion and coherence. Manipulating cohesion and coherence for pragmatic effect.
6 Context and background knowledge: deixis. Social deixis and the T/V distinction in Croatian and English. Translational issues.
7 Politeness. Positive and negative face. Differences between Croatian and English. Translational issues.
8 Revision
9 Speech acts: background. Felicity conditions. Possible consequences for translation.
10 Speech acts and society. A cross-cultural view: finding differences between English and Croatian.
11 The cooperative principle: background. Theory and examples of maxims. Flouting and violating maxims.
12 The cooperative principle: examples and their translation.
13 Textual differences: achieving pragmatic effect in different types of text. Pragmatic effect and functions of language: recognition and translation. Examples, discussion, problems.
14 Discourse analysis, pragmatics and culture. The translator as a cultural mediator.
15 Revision.

Psycholinguistics

Course title:  Psycholinguistics
Lecturer: 
Irena Zovko Dinković, PhD, associate professor
ECTS credits: 
5
Language:
  English
Semester:
  3rd (winter) term of graduate studies
Status:
elective
Course form: 
4 hours of lecture per week

Enrollment requirements:
   –
Exam:
  written
Objectives:
  introduce the students to the basic concepts of the area of study, namely the acquisition, perception and comprehension of language, in order to explore the relationship between language, thought and culture.

Week by week schedule:

 

Week Topic
1. General information about the course. Introduction to the key concepts of psycholinguistics. Language and communication: is language specific to humans?
2. Animal communication and human communication. Feral children and the critical age issue.
3. The cognitive basis of language: how children learn language. The nature vs. nurture debate
4. Early semantic and syntactic development. Bilingualism and second language learning.
5. The biological basis of language: language and the brain.
6. Language disorders: aphasias and dyslexias. Other language-related disorders. Sign language.
7. REVISION
8. The structure of sentences. Word meaning. Comprehension.
9. The structure and content of the ‘mental lexicon’: how humans learn and store words, how they find the right word and understand the words of others. Lexical retrieval.
10. Language and memory: long-term memory and short-term (working) memory.
11. Language processing: bottom-up and top-down processing; serial and parallel processing. Perceptual and conceptual information. The role of context.
12. Productive language skills: writing and speaking.
13. Receptive language skills: reading and listening. The whole-word approach vs. the decoding approach.
14. The social basis of language: the relationship between language, thought and culture.
15. FINAL REVISION and COURSE ASSESSMENT. PREPARATION FOR THE EXAM.

Course description:
The course covers the key topics organized in weekly units. After most units the students do exercises which they check in class with the lecturer. The students are also expected to read at home relevant chapters from the obligatory readings and are advised to read selected parts from additional literature, which further help them to acquire better insight into the subject matter.

Course requirements:
The students are advised to attend the course regularly and are encouraged to actively participate in class. There is one review at mid-semester and a final review during the last week of the course. At the end of the course the students take a written exam.

Obligatory reading:
– Field, John (2003) Psycholinguistics, London and New York: Routledge
– Harley, Trevor (2001) The Psychology of Language: From Data to Theory, Hove and New York: Psychology Press Ltd.
– Steinberg, Danny, Hiroshi Nagata and David Aline (2001, 2nd ed.) Psycholinguistics: Language, Mind and World, Harlow: Longman

Suggested reading:
– Aitchison, Jean (1998, 4th ed.) The Articulate Mammal: An Introduction to Psycholinguistics London and New York: Routledge
– Aitchison, Jean (2003) Words in the Mind: An Introduction to the Mental Lexicon, Oxford: Blackwell
– Anderson, Stephen and David Lightfoot(2002) The Language Organ: Linguistics as Cognitive Physiology, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (selected chapters)
– Burling, Robbins (2005) The Talking Ape: How language evolved, Oxford: Oxford University Press
– Field, John (2005) Language and the Mind, London and New York: Routledge
– Pinker, Steven (2007) The Stuff of Thought: Language as a Window into Human Nature, New York: Viking

 

 

English Across the World

Course title: English Across the World
Instructor
: Prof. dr. Višnja Josipović Smojver
ECTS credits: 5
Language:
English
Status:
elective (4 hours)
Semester: III
(winter)
Exam
: written
Course requirements:
No special requirements
Course description:
The course describes the contemporary varieties of English, including the newly emerged standard Englishes and major substandard ones. It deals with the spreading of English outside Europe and covers topics such as prestige vs. stigmatized varieties, recent trends in spoken English, lexical variation in the Englishes of the world, English-based creoles, English as a second language, Internet English, and English as a Lingua Franca.

Objectives:
Getting acquainted with the linguistic variation  resulting from the globalization of English and learning to describe it scientifically.

Obligatory literature:

  • Jenkins, J. (2003), World Englishes: A resource book for students. Routledge.
  • Kirkpatrick, A. (2007), World Englishes. CUP.
  • Kortman, B., C. Upton, W. Schneider, K. Burridge, R. Mesthrie, eds. (2008), Varieties of English, Vol.s 1-4. Berlin – New York: Mouton de Gruyter. (= reference)

 Further reading:

  • Britain, D., ed.  (2007), Language in the British Isles. CUP.  
  • Crystal, D. (2006), Language and the Internet. 2nd ed. CUP.
  • Crystal, D. (2011), Internet Linguistics: A Student Guide. Routledge.  
  • Cogo, A. & M.Dewey (2012), Analysing English as a Lingua Franca: A Corpus-driven investigation. London-New York: Continuum.
  • Hughes, A., P. Trudgill & D. Watt (2005), English Accents and Dialects. 4th edn. Edward Arnold.
  • Mesthrie, R. & R.M. Bhatt (2008), World Englishes: The Study of New Linguistic Varieties. CUP.
  • Metcalf, A. (2000), How we Talk: American Regional English Today (a talking tour of American English, region by region). Boston – New York: Houghton Mifflin Company.
  • Nagle, S.J. & S.L. Sanders (2003), English in the Southern United States. CUP.
  • Seidlhofer, B. (2011), Understanding English as a Lingua Franca. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Trudgill, P., ed. (1984), Language in the British Isles. CUP.
  • Trudgill, P. & J. K. Chambers, eds. (1991), Dialects of English: Studies in Grammatical Variation. London  Longman.
  • Trudgill, P. & J. Hannah (1985), International English: A Guide to Varieties of Standard English. 2nd ed. Edward Arnold.
  • Wolfram, W. & N. Schilling – Estes (2006), American English. 2nd ed. Blackwell. 

 www.abdn.ac.uk/langling/resources

 journals: English World Wide
               World Englishes
               English Today

               Journal of English as a Lingua Franca

Week by week schedule:

  1. Introduction; English as a global language
  2.  the Inner-Outer-Expanding Circles (Kirkpatrick); new Englishes vs. New Englishes
  3. Standard, standardization, multilingualism
  4. British English vs. North American English vs. Australian English
  5. English in the British Isles: standard and non-standard variation
  6. Irish English  – Welsh English – Scottish English
  7. English in Africa
  8. Asian English: introduction, classification
  9. South Asian English
  10. SE Asian and Pacific English
  11. English in Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei and the Philippines
  12. Emerging Englises: English in Hong Kong and China
  13. Netglish
  14. Non-native Englishes
  15. English as a Lingua Franca

 

          

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