Category Archives: KNJIŽEVNI SEMINARI – 4. ili 6. semestar

African American Literature: 1800-Present (2019)

Course title: African American Literature: 1800-Present
Instructor: Prof. Mark Metzler Sawin, PhD (visiting scholar)

ECTS credits: 6
Language: English
Duration: Semester 4, 6 summer – CONDENSED COURSE, April-June 2019
Status: elective
Enrolment requirements: completed Introduction to English Lit/Introduction to English Lit 1 and 2

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download syllabus (.PDF)

COURSE DESCRIPTION & OBJECTIVES:
In the first chapter of his monumental work The Souls of Black Folk (1903) W.E.B. Du Bois wrote:
…the Negro is a sort of seventh son, born with a veil, and gifted with second-sight in this American world, —a world which yields him no true selfconsciousness, but only lets him see himself through the revelation of the other world. It is a peculiar sensation, this double-consciousness, this sense of always looking at one’s self through the eyes of others, of measuring one’s soul by the tape of a world that looks on in amused contempt and pity. One ever feels his two-ness, —an American, a Negro; two souls, two thoughts, two unreconciled strivings; two warring ideals in one dark body, whose dogged strength alone keeps it from being torn asunder.
The history of the American Negro is the history of this strife, —this longing to attain self-conscious manhood, to merge his double self into a better and truer self. In this merging he wishes neither of the older selves to be lost. He would not Africanize America, for America has too much to teach the world and Africa. He would not bleach his Negro soul in a flood of white Americanism, for he knows that Negro blood has a message for the world. He simply wishes to make it possible for a man to be both a Negro and an American, without being cursed and spit upon by his fellows, without having the doors of Opportunity closed roughly in his face. This, then, is the end of his striving: to be a co-worker in the kingdom of culture, to escape both death and isolation, to husband and use his best powers and his latent genius.

This course is a study of African American literature and culture through the 19th and 20th centuries and up to today, however, if it succeeds, it will go far deeper than this, becoming an insightful investigation of the “double consciousness” that Du Bois alluded to 115 years ago. Themes for this course will include the Construction of Race, Slavery, Emancipation, Jim Crow, Lynching, Jazz, Urbanization, the Harlem Renaissance, Desegregation, Civil Rights, R&B & Rock n’ Roll, the Sports and Entertainment Industries, Victimization, White-guilt, Political Correctness, Affirmative Action, and Hip-Hop Culture.
Because of its combined literary and cultural foci, the methodology of this course will be somewhat unconventional, using not only literary texts and documents, but also many cultural creations (film, music, etc.) to examine the story of Black America. This is necessary because this subject is complex and culturally loaded—the construction, enforcement, reconstruction, and slow transformation of “Black” and “White” America is at the center of the dynamic tension that has driven much of American history, from the ravages of Slavery and the Civil War to the creation of the amazing and distinctive African American culture that heavily impacts the global
culture of the 21st century. Each week will include a lecture on the context & culture of Black America for the given era, and then a discussion of the assigned texts. Learning to examine, explain, and understand the vibrant literary and cultural creations of Black America is the goal of this course.
EVALUATION:
Reading Responses: Each week during this seven-week class there will be both required and supplemental texts—I will provide access to all materials. Students are responsible for four Response Essays (500 to 1,000 words) based on the texts and the material from lectures. I will expect these essays to be an insightful analysis of our texts, written in clean, crisp, concise prose. Your grade will be based on your top three responses.
Class Participation: You will all be expected to attend each lecture, to thoroughly read each required text, and to actively participate in class discussions. For the first few weeks of class, this will be done in a “cyber” format because I’ll still be in the U.S.A. From that point forward, we will meet regularly at the university.
                                         ASSIGNMENTS & SCORING
Reading Responses (3 x 25%) = 75%
Class Participation = 25%
Grades will be based on a ten-point scale:
5 = 100-90% 4 = 89-80% 3 = 79-70% 2 = 69-60% 1 = 59-0%
Assignments turned in late will be penalized 10%
COURSE SCHEDULE: (*denotes required text)
Week 1. Slavery & the American Civil War (starting Monday, April 22)
– *Folktales & Spirituals (early 1800s)
– Martin Delany. The Condition, Elevation, Emigration & Destiny of the
Colored People of the United States (selections) (1852)
– Frederick Douglass. My Bondage and My Freedom (selections) (1855)
– Harriet Jacobs. Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (selections) (1861)
– *Sojourner Truth. “Ar’n’t I a Woman?” (1864)
Week 2. Reconstruction & the Rise & Fall of Black Rights (starting Monday, April 29)
– *Charles Chesnutt. “The Wife of His Youth” (1898)
– Booker T. Washington. “The Atlanta Exposition Address” (1895)
– W.E.B. Du Bois. The Souls of Black Folk (selections) (1903)
Week 3. Segregated America (starting Monday, May 6)
– *James Weldon Johnson. Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man (1912)
Week 4. The Harlem Renaissance (starting Monday, May 13)
– *Langston Hughes. Poetry & Essays (1910-20s)
– *W.E.B. DuBois. “The Comet” (1920)
– Marcus Garvey. “The Negro’s Greatest Enemy” (1923)
– Paul Robeson in the Eugene O’Neill film. The Emperor Jones (1933)
– Ken Burns documentary. JAZZ vol. 2 (2001)
Week 5. The Civil Rights Era (starting Monday, May20)
– *Ralph Ellison. Invisible Man (selections) (1952)
– TV Episode. Amos ‘n’ Andy (1952)
– *Martin Luther King Jr. & Malcolm X. (selections) (1960s)
– James Baldwin documentary. I Am Not Your Negro (2016)
Week 6. All Funked Up: Hip Hop America (starting Monday, May 27)
– *Documentary on Blaxploitation. BaadAsssss Cinema (2002)
– Blaxploitation film. Shaft (1971)
– Early Hip Hop film. Wild Style (1983)
– *Spike Lee film. Do the Right Thing (1989)
– John Singleton film. Boyz n the Hood (1991)
– Spike Lee film. Bamboozled (2000)
Week 7. Black Lives Matter?!: Race in America Today (starting Monday, June 3)
– *Ta-Nehisi Coates. (selection of essays) (2010s)
– Malcolm Gladwell (selection of essay) (2010s)
– Ryan Coogler film. Fruitdale Station (2013)
– Barry Jenkins film. Moonlight (2016)

American Short Story

Course title: American Short Story
Instructor: Asst. Prof. Sven Cvek
ECTS credits: 6
Status: elective
Semester: 4th or 6th
Enrollment requirements: Introduction to the Study of English Literature 1 and 2

Course description:
The short story in the US is said to be the “national art form”. Taking up this assumption critically, this course we will offer a historical overview of the presence of the short story in American culture. We will consider the formal, institutional and political-economic aspects of the short story’s production, distribution, and reception. We will be especially interested in: the assumption about the national belonging of this form; the problems of cultural form or genre; the material conditions for the form’s continuity and change. Therefore, we will approach the short story in the context of wider social relations, paying particular attention to the relationship between social transformation and formal change. Since the short story spans the entire history of the United States, the course will vary and shift its focus, both in terms of historical period (from 1800 until today), and in terms of specific problems (the question of genre; of literary infrastructure, such as magazines and creative writing workshops; the question of the short story as a cultural document; the question of transformations and possibilities of short forms today; etc).

Course objective:
The objective of the course is to introduce students to the corpus of the American short story, the theoretical and critical literature about this form, as well as encourage them to think critically about the emergence, development and changes of cultural forms in the context of wider social processes.

Course requirements:
regular attendance and reading, written continual assessment, final essay paper.

Literature:
Selection of American short stories.
Online material (Omega).
Bendixen Alfred & James Nagel (eds), A Companion to the American Short Story. Wiley-Blackwell, 2010.
Gelfant Blanche H. & Lawrence Graver (eds), The Columbia Companion to the Twentieth-century American Short Story. Columbia UP, 2000.
Levy, Andrew. The Culture and Commerce of the American Short Story, Cambridge UP, 1993.
Scofield, Martin. The Cambridge Introduction to the American Short Story. Cambridge UP, 2006.
Shapiro, Stephen. Culture and Commerce of the Early American Novel:
Reading the Atlantic World-System. The Pennsylvania State UP, 2008.

Twentieth Century American Poetry

Title of the course: Twentieth Century American Poetry
Lecturer: prof.dr. Stipe Grgas
ECTS: 6
Language: English
Duration: 4th or 6th semester
Status: elective course
Teaching mode: 1 hour lecturing, 2 hours of seminar work weekly
Preconditions for enrollment: „Introduction to the Study of English Literature “ I and II

Contents of the course: The course offers a description, a reading and an interpretation of American poetry published from the end of the nineteenth century to the present day. The departure point for the course is the assumption that during the last couple of decades poetry has been marginalized in philological studies. The course will argue for the relevance of this archive. The focus will be on the specificity of the art of poetry, on the transformations undergone by poetry within the system of literature but also in the broader cultural environment. The diachronic reading of American poets will seek out their differentiating features but will also point to what these poets share with poetry writing in other literary and cultural contexts. The basic methodological premise of the course is that poetry develops according to its own immanent laws but that it also mirrors the challenges of of the world outside of literature. Because of the immense quantity of primary material the course will make a selection from the extant material and choose not only representative poets but representative texts by the chosen writers. The course proposes to continually rely on the accessibility on the Internet of not only texts but of recorded readings of poems.

Aim of the course: The students will acquaint themselves with a very important segment of twentieth century poetry. The aim of the course is to make the students aware of a marginalized literary genre, train them how to approach it and convince them of the multifaceted function and importance of the poetic word.

Student obligation: Fulfill the obligations stipulated by the model of continuous evaluation. During the semester the students must write a number of short papers on assigned texts while they have to hand in a longer seminar paper in the next to last session. The last session is reserved for the written exam.

Division of the course by weeks:
1. On poetry in general
2. Predecessors (Dickinson/Whitman)
3. Modernists abroad: Ezra Pound i T.S. Eliot
4. Modernists at home: Robert Frost, William Carlos Williams
5. Modernists at home: Hart Crane, William Carlos Williams, Hart Crane, Louis Zukofsky
6. Gendered Voices: Marianne Moore, H.D., Elizabeth Bishop, Sylvia Plath
7. Confessional Poetry: John Berryman, Robert Lowell, Theodore Roethke
8. Beat poets: Allen Ginsberg, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Charles Bukowski
9. Black Mountain Poets: Charles Olson, Robert Creeley
10. Deep Image Poetry: Robert Bly, Mark Strand
11. New York School: John Ashberry, Frank O’Hara
12. 1970s: Gwendolyn Brooks, Nikki Giovanni
13. Language Poetry: Bob Perelman, Charles Bernstein
14. Final discussion, written exam

Obligatory texts: A selection of a poem or a number of poems from the opus of the poets listed above.

Secondary literature: Studies dealing with poetry in general, particularly those dealing with modern poetry. Manifestos written by some of the poets. Finally, the many books dealing with American poetry as well as the case book studies of individual works and writers.

 

The Nineteenth-Century English Novel

Course title: The Nineteenth-Century English Novel
Instructor: prof.dr.sc. Borislav Knežević
ECTS credits: 6
Form of instruction: three hours a week
Semester: 4th or 6th
Enrolment requirements: Introduction to the Study of English Literature 1 and 2

Course description: The course presents a survey of the English novel in the 19th century, the period of a great expansion of the genre of the novel in the context of a fast-growing literary market for the middle class. During that period the genre of the novel was strongly marked by the attempt of the novelists to take part in the shaping of social debates on important issues of British society in the context of fast changes. The selection of novels in this course is designed to illustrate some of the central social issues in the 19th century English novel, such as themes related to marriage, class ideologies, industrialization, the British Empire, and writing as a profession.

Objectives: In terms of content, the goal of the course is to familiarize the students with several novels from one of the most productive periods in the history of the English novel. The course places an emphasis on active student engagement with the literary text, in order for the students to master the skills of interpreting literary texts.

Course requirements: The grade is based on a written essay at the end of term (5 pages), a mid-term quiz, and a quiz at the end of term.

Week by week schedule:
week 1: Introduction
week 2: Persuasion
week 3: Persuasion
week 4: Hard Times
week 5: Hard Times
week 6: Hard Times, Aurora Leigh
week 7: First Quiz. Aurora Leigh
week 8: Aurora Leigh
week 9: Aurora Leigh, The Moonstone
week 10: The Moonstone
week 11: Essay due.
week 12: The Moonstone, The War of the Worlds
week 13: The War of the Worlds
week 14: The War of the Worlds
week 15: Second quiz.

Reading:
Primary literature
Jane Austen, Persuasion
Charles Dickens, Hard Times
Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Aurora Leigh
Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone
H.G. Wells, The War of the Worlds

Primary literature may also include the following novels:
Elizabeth Gaskell, Mary Barton
W.M. Thackeray, Barry Lyndon
Anthony Trollope, The Warden
H. Rider Haggard, King Solomon’s Mines
George Gissing, The Odd Women

Secondary literature (optional):
Catherine Gallagher, The Industrial Reformation of English Fiction, 1832—1867 (excerpts)
Jürgen Osterhammel, The Transformation of the World: A Global History of the Nineteenth Century (excerpts)
Mary Poovey, Genres of the Credit Economy (excerpts)
Tony Tanner, Jane Austen (excerpts)
Raymond Williams, Culture and Society1780—1950 (excerpts)

 

The Anthropocene in British and Australian Fiction and Film

Course title: Anthropocene in British and Australian Fiction and Film
Instructor: Dr. Iva Polak, Assoc. Prof.
ECTS credit: 6
Language: English
Duration: Semester 4 or 6
Status: Elective
Enrolment requirements: Introduction to English Literature 1 i 2
Course description: We will discuss cultural implications of the Anthropocene, a new geological era in which humans have become a geological force on a planetary scale to be reckoned with. Starting with Timothy Morton’s claim that man is “the detective and the criminal” (Dark Ecology, 2016), we will consider a selection of British and Australian novels which fictionalise and project into the future a series of issues affecting the present climate and our planet: fossil fuel burning, global warming, decreased biological diversity, global population increase, climate refugees. The selected works use satire and irony, and since they are voiced from different cultural, ethnic and gender positions, they offer different recipes for avoiding/surviving the end of the world.
Objectives : Students will get to know the implication of the new geological era and how it has influenced cultural production from the UK and Australia.
Course requirements: The final grade is based on continuous assessment which includes regular attendance (max. 4 unattended classes), preparation for and participation in class, writing small assignments, timely submission of the final paper, and obligatory sitting for midterm and endterm exam. The paper is worth 35%, midterm and endterm exams are worth 50% and other elements of continuous assessment are worth 15% of the final grade. Students must meet all requirements of continuous assessment.
The exact date of the mid-term exam is defined in cooperation with the students. Topics for the  main written assignment (student paper) are selected in week 8.

Week by week schedule
WEEK 1

Introduction into the Anthropocene (anthropos vs homo, Anthropocene, Capitalocene, Chthulucene, anthropocentrism, post/trans/humanism, hyperobject, ecological thought…)
WEEK 2
British fiction and film of the Anthropocene (ecology, climate, dystopia, genre hybridity) 
WEEK 3
J. G. Ballard. High Rise (1975)
WEEK 4
High Rise (2015), dir. Ben Wheatley
WEEK 5
The Age of Stupid (2009), dir. Franny Armstrong, documentary; An Inconvenient Truth (2006), dir. Davis Guggenheim, documentary
WEEK 6
Saci Lloyd. It’s the End of the World As We Know It (2015)
WEEK 7
Midterm exam; preparation for student paper
WEEK 8
Jeanette Winterson. The Stone Gods (2007).
WEEK 9
Australian fiction and film of the Anthropocene (ecology, climate, dystopia, genre hybridity) 
WEEK 10
This Changes Everything (2015) dir. Avi Levis, documentary
WEEK 11
Mireille Juchau. The World Without Us (2018)
WEEK 12
Alexis Wright: The Swan Book (2013)
WEEK 13
Alexis Wright: The Swan Book (2013) cont.
WEEK 14
Final discussion; endterm exam

Reading list:
Novels

J. G. Ballard. High Rise (1975)
Saci Lloyd. It’s the End of the World As We Know It (2015)
Jeanette Winterson. The Stone Gods (2007)
Mireille Juchau. The World Without Us (2015)
Alexis Wright: The Swan Book (2013)

Critical editions:
– Bhabha, Homi K. “Notes on Globalisation and Ambivalence”, Cultural Politics in a Global Age: Uncertainty, Solidarity and Innovation, David Held i Henrietta L. Moore (ed.), Oxford Oneworld, 2007: 36-47.
– Braidotti, Rosi and Maria Hlavajova (eds.) Posthuman Glossary, Bloomsbury Academic, 2018. (terminology)
– Chakrabarty, Dipesh. “The Climate of History: Four Theses”, Critical Inquiry 35, 2009: 197-222.
– Clark, Timothy. The Cambridge Introduction to Literature and the Environment (Cambridge Introductions to Literature), 2011. (selection)
– Meneley, Tobians and Jesse Oak Taylor (eds). Anthropocene Reading: Literary History in Geological Times. PennState University Press, 2017. (selection)
– Trexler, Adam. Anthropocene Fictions: The Novel in a Time of Climate Change (Under the Sign of Nature), University of Virginia Press, 2015. (selection)
– Usher, Phillilp John, “ Untranslating the Anthropocene”, Diacritics, 44:3, 2016: 56-77. 

Further reading (optional):
– Clark, Timothy. Ecocriticism on the Edge: The Anthropocene as a Threshold Concept., Bloomsbury Academic, 2015.
– Hulme, Mike. Why We Disagree about Climate Change: Understanding Controversy, Inaction and Opportunity, 4th Ed, Cambridge University Press, 2009.
– Moore, Jason W. (ed.), Anthropocene or Capitalocene? Nature, History and the Crisis of Capitalism, PM Press, 2016.
– Morton, Timothy. Dark Ecology: For a Logic of Future Existence, Columbia University Press, 2016.
– Morton, Timothy. Hyperobjects: Philosophy and Ecology after the End of the World (Posthumanities), University of Minnesota Press 2013.
– Morton, Timothy. The Ecological Thought, Harvard University Press (2010) 2012.

All textual and audiovisual materials are provided in electronic format.

 

Victorian Literature and the Transformation of the World in the Nineteenth Century

Course title: Victorian Literature and the Transformation of the World in the Nineteenth Century
Instructor
: Professor Tatjana Jukić
ECTS credits: 6
Language: English
Semester: 4 or 6

Enrollment requirements: Introduction to the Study of English Literature 1 and 2

Course description: Taking Jürgen Osterhammel’s history of the 19th century as its point of departure, the course will explore how Victorian literature engages and defines critical developments that we normally associate with modernity in the 20th and the 21st centuries, especially with the imaginary of catastrophe (ranging from world wars to climate change). We will focus on a selection of texts by Alfred Tennyson, Elizabeth Gaskell, Robert Browning, Charles Dickens, Matthew Arnold, John Ruskin and Arthur Conan Doyle.

Course requirements: The grade is based on a written essay at the end of term (30% of the final grade), and two tests (30% of the final grade each), as well as on active participation in the class (10% of the final grade).

WEEK 1 Osterhammel’s history of the world in the nineteenth century. The Victorians and the transformation of the world.
WEEK 2 Victorian literature: narrative transformations.
WEEK 3 Tennyson’s early poetry: psychopolitics in the 1830s and the 1840s. „The Lady of Shalott“
WEEK 4 The Industrial Revolution and the industrial novel (1): Elizabeth Gaskell, North and South.
WEEK 5 The Industrial Revolution and the industrial novel (2): Elizabeth Gaskell, North and South.
WEEK 6 Browning in the 1850s: Victorian modernities. „Love Among the Ruins“
WEEK 7 Midterm.
WEEK 8 Dickens on revolution (1): A Tale of Two Cities.
WEEK 9 Dickens on revolution (2): A Tale of Two Cities.
WEEK 10 Arnold on revolution: psychopolitics in the 1860s. „The Function of Criticism at the Present Time“
WEEK 11 The Victorian Anthropocene: John Ruskin, „The Storm-Cloud of the Nineteenth Century“
WEEK 12 The Victorian biopolitics (1): Arthur Conan Doyle, A Study in Scarlet.
WEEK 13 The Victorian biopolitics (2): Arthur Conan Doyle, A Study in Scarlet.
WEEK 14 Final discussion.
WEEK 15 Final test. Evaluation.

Required reading:
Arnold, Matthew. „The Function of Criticism at the Present Time“
Browning, Robert. Poetry (selection)
Conan Doyle, Arthur. A Study in Scarlet
Dickens, Charles. A Tale of Two Cities
Gaskell, Elizabeth. North and South
Ruskin, John. „The Storm-Cloud of the Nineteenth Century“
Tennyson, Alfred. Poetry (selection)
Osterhammel, Jürgen. The Transformation of the World: A Global History of the Nineteenth Century (selection)

Optional reading:
Williams, Raymond. Culture and Society, 1750-1950. 1958. (selection)
Ginzburg, Carlo. „Morelli, Freud and Sherlock Holmes: Clues and Scientific Method.“ 1980.
Gallagher, Catherine. The Industrial Reformation of English Fiction. Social Discourse and Narrative Form 1832-1867. 1985. (selection)
Armstrong, Nancy. Desire and Domestic Fiction. A Political History of the Novel. 1987. (selection)
Armstrong, Isobel. Victorian Poetry. Poetry, Politics and Poetics. 1993. (selection)
Schor, Hilary M. Dickens and the Daughter of the House. 1999. (selection)
Jordan, John O. (ed.). The Cambridge Companion to Charles Dickens. 2001. (selection)
Matus, Jill (ed.). The Cambridge Companion to Elizabeth Gaskell. 2007. (selection)
Behlman, Lee and Anne Longmuir (eds.). Victorian Literature. Criticism and Debates. 2015. (selection)

 

Ethics and Aesthetics of British Modernism

Course title: Ethics and Aesthetics of British Modernism
Instructor: Martina Domines Veliki, PhD
ECTS credits: 6
Language: English
Duration: 2nd or 4th semester
Status: elective
Course type: 1 hour of lecture, 2 hours of seminar
Prerequisites: completed undergraduate studies
Course description: The course deals with trauma theory the New Poverty Studies in order to address the issue of modernist subjectivity in a wider socio-political context after the First World War.
Course requirements: continuous assessment (midterm and final exam, final paper, class attendance and participation).

Weekly schedule:
Week 1: socio-historical context, 1930s in England
Week 2: First World War and war trauma
Week 3: Mrs. Dalloway (1925)
Week 4: Mrs. Dalloway continued
Week 5: Robert Graves, Siegfried Sassoon, Wilfred Owen (selections of poetry)
Week 6: Goodbye To All That (1929)
 Week 7: Mid-term exam
Week 8: New Poverty Studies, introduction
Week 9: Sons and Lovers (1931)
Week 10: Sons and Lovers continued
Week 11: Down and Out in Paris and London (1933)
Week 12: Down and Out continued
Week 13: Pygmalion (1913)
Week 14: final remarks
Week 15: End-term exam, seminar paper


Reading list:
Primary literature:
Virginia Woolf (1925) Mrs. Dalloway
Robert Graves, Siegfried Sassoon and Wilfred Owen – selections of poetry
Robert Graves (1929) Goodbye To All That
D.H. Lawrence (1931) Sons and Lovers
George Orwell (1933) Down and Out in Paris and London
George Bernard Shaw (1913) Pygmalion

Secondary literature:
Caruth, Cathy (ed.)
Trauma – Explorations in Memory (Baltimore and London: The Johns Hopkins UP, 1995)
Childs, Peter. Modernism (London and New York: Routledge, 2000)
Clarke, J., C. Critcher and R. Johnson. Working-Class Culture: Studies in History and Theory (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1979)
Ellison, David. Ethics and Aesthetics in European Modernist Literature (Cambridge UP, 2001)
Haywood, Ian. Working-Class Fiction: from Chartism to Trainspotting (Plymouth: Northcote House Publishers, 1997)
Hoggart, Richard. The Uses of Literacy (Penguin Books, 1960)
Howarth, Peter. British Poetry in the Age of Modernism (Cambridge UP, 2005)
Hunt, Nigel C. Memory, War and Trauma (Cambridge UP, 2010)
Innes, Christopher. The Cambridge Companion to George Bernard Shaw (Cambridge UP, 1998)
Korte, Barbara, Frédéric Regard (eds.) Narrating Poverty and Precarity in Britain (Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter, 2014)
Leys, Ruth. Trauma-A Genealogy (Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press, 2000)
Lewis, Pericles. The Cambridge Introduction to Modernism (Cambridge UP, 2007)
Linehan, Thomas. Modernism and British Socialism (Palgrave Macmillan, 2012)
Luckhurst, Roger. The Trauma Question (London and New York: Routledge, 2008)
Punter, David. The Literature of Pity (Edinburgh UP, 2014)
Rabaté, Jean-Michel. 1913: The Cradle of Modernism (Blackwell Publishing, 2007)
Ramazani, Jahan. Poetry of Mourning: The Modern Elegy from Hardy to Heaney (The University of Chicago Press, 1994)
Russo, John and Sherry Lee Linkon. New Working-Class Studies (Ithaca and London: Cornell UP, 2005)
Sellers, Susan (ed.). The Cambridge Companion to Virginia Woolf (Cambridge UP, 2000)
Silkin, Jon (ed.) The Penguin Book of First World War Poetry (London: Penguin Books, 1978)

 

British Romanticism: prose

Course title: British Romanticism: prose
Instructor: Martina Domines Veliki, PhD
ECTS credits: 6
Language: English
Duration: 4th or 6th, 8th or 10th semester
in ac. year 2017/18: 4th or 6th semester

Status: elective
Course type: 1 hour of lecture, 2 hours of seminar
Enrollment requirements: enrollment in the 4th or 6th, 8th or 10th semester
Prerequisites: Introduction to English Literature

Course description: This module aims to engage students at a high level of scholarly rigour with the key themes, ideas and concerns of British Romanticism and with the wider historical, cultural and political contexts out of which they emerged. We will depart from the socio-historical contexts (Scottish Enlightenment, French Revolution, women rights) and a selection of texts which were central for the lively public debates of the period. We will then continue with the representative prose texts covering the gothic novel, the Scottish historical novel and Romantic confessional writing. Primary readings will be balanced with critical essays.
Course requirements: continuous assessment (midterm and final exam, final paper, class attendance and participation).

Weekly schedule:
Week 1: socio-historical context, from the Scottish Enlightenment to English Romanticism, excerpts from Edmund Burke: Reflections on the French Revolution, Thomas Paine: Rights of Man, Mary Wollstonecraft: A Vindication of the Rights of Women
Week 2: historical novel, Scottish national identity
Week 3: Sir Walter Scott (1814) Waverley
Week 4: Waverley
Week 5: autobiography, Romantic confessional narratives (from St. Augustine to Jean-Jacques Rousseau)
Week 6: James Hogg (1824) The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner
Week 7: Thomas de Quincey (1821) Confessions of an English Opium-Eater
Week 8: Mid-term exam
Week 9: gothic novel-genre development
Week 10: Horace Walpole (1764) The Castle of Otranto
 Week 11: Jane Austen (1817) Northanger Abbey
 Week 12: <Northanger Abbey some scenes from the movie Northanger Abbey directed by Jon Jones (2007)
Week 13: Mary Shelley (1818) Frankenstein
 Week 14: Frankensteincont. with some scenes from the movie Frankenstein (2004) directed by Kenneth Branagh
Week 15: End-term exam, seminar paper

Reading list:
Primary literature :
Sir Walter Scott (1814) Waverley
James Hogg (1824) The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner
Thomas de Quincey (1821) Confessions of an English Opium-Eater
Horace Walpole (1764), The Castle of Otranto
Jane Austen (1817) Northanger Abbey
Mary Shelley (1818) Frankenstein

Secondary literature:
Anderson, Linda. Autobiography (New York & London: Routlege, 2001)
Broadie, Alexander (ed.) The Cambridge Companion to the Scottish Enlightenment (Cambridge UP, 2003)
Burwick, Frederick. Thomas de Quincey: Knowledge and Power (Palgrave Macmillan, 2001)
Chandler, James. The Cambridge History of English Romantic Literature (Cambridge UP,
2008)
Clery, E. J. Women’s Gothic: from Clara Reeve to Mary Shelley. (Tavistock, 2004)
Copeland, Edward and Juliet McMaster (ed.) The Cambridge Companion to Jane Austen
(Cambridge UP, 1997)
Crawford, Robert (ed.). The Scottish Invention of English Literature (Cambridge UP, 1998)
Daiches, David. The Scottish Enlightenment (Edinburgh and Aberdeen: The Saltire Society,
1986)
De Bolla, Peter, Nigel Leask, David Simpson. Land, Nation, Culture: 1740-1840 (Palgrave Macmillan, 2005)
De Groot, Jerome. The Historical Novel (London, New York: Routledge, 2010)
Duncan, Ian. Scott’s Shadow: The Novel in Romantic Edinburgh (Princeton and Oxford:
Princeton University Press, 2007)
Duncan, Ian and Douglas S. Mack (ed.) The Edinburgh Companion to James Hogg
(Edinburgh UP, 2012)
Levi, Susan M. The Romantic Art of Confession (New York and Woodbridge: Camden
House1998)
Lukács Georg. The Historical Novel (London: Merlin Press, 1962)
McCalman, Ian. An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age: British Culture 1776-1832
(Oxford UP, 1999)
Moretti, Franco. Atlas of the European Novel, 1800-1900 (London and New York: Verso,
1998)
Moretti, Franco. Signs Taken for Wonders (London and New York, 1983)
Olney, James. Memory and Narrative: the weave of life-writing (Chicago: University of
Chicago Press, 2000)
Punter, David (ed.) A Companion to the Gothic (Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, 2008)
Robertson, Fiona (ed.). Edinburgh Companion to Sir Walter Scott (Edinburgh UP, 2012)
Smith, Joanna M. (ed.) Frankenstein: complete authoritative text with biographical and
historical contexts, critical history and essays from five contemporary critical perspectives. (Boston: Bedford Books of St Martin’s Press, 1992)
Smith, Sidonie, Julia Watson (eds.) Women, Autobiography, Theory: a Reader (Madison:
University of Wisconsin Press, 1998)
Townshend, Dale. The Orders of Gothic: Foucault, Lacan and the subject of Gothic
writing, 1764 – 1820 (New York: AMS Press, 2007)
Wu, Duncan (ed.). A Companion to Romanticism (Oxford: Blackwell, 1998)

British Romanticism: poetry

Course title: British Romanticism: poetry
(Former course title: English Romantic Poetry)
Course coordinator: Martina Domines Veliki, PhD
Instructor:
Martina Domines Veliki, PhD
ECTS credits: 6
Language: English
Duration: 1 semester (3rd or 5th, 4th or 6th semester)
Status: elective
Course type: 1 hour of lecture, 2 hours of seminar
Prerequisites: Introduction to English Literature or Introduction into English Lit 1 and 2, 4/6 semester enrollment
Course requirements: continuous assessment (midterm and final exam, final paper, class attendance and participation)

Objective: The students will be introduced to the major poets of English Romanticism, as well as their relevant historical, cultural, political and aesthetic milieu. The aim of this course is to encourage students to create their own view of the suggested array of poems through close reading. They will be asked to think about and analyze these poems with the help of a number of critical texts (from new historicist to post-structuralist ones).

Course description: Authors we will read include Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley and Keats. Through reading of their representative poetry we will tackle some fundamental Romantic concepts such as poetic inspiration, memory of the past events, the sublime, deism and mysticism, the relationship between the poetic subject and nature as well as the role played by language. The poetic subject becomes the central topic of most Romantic poetry and it is actualized through a close relationship with nature that acts as either a consoling or a debilitating force. Priority will be given to the Romantic poets of the first generation. These poets often imagine themselves to be responding to the French Revolution. They rebel against social injustice, cherishing feelings for ‘common’ people and believing, in the words of Shelley, that they are indeed the acknowledged ‘legislators of the world’.

Weekly schedule:
week 1:
Introduction into English Romanticism. Historical background.

week 2: William Blake – selections from Songs of Innocence and Experience
week 3:
Blake continued – “The Marriage of Heaven and Hell”
week 4:
William Wordsworth – excerpts from the 1800 Preface to Lyrical Ballads, a selection of poems from Lyrical Ballads
week 5:
Wordsworth continued: a selection of poems from Poems in Two Volumes
week 6:
Wordsworth continued – The Prelude (chosen books)
week 7: Samuel Taylor Coleridge
– selections from Biographia Literaria
week 8:
Coleridge continued – “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner”, “Dejection: an Ode”, “Kubla Khan”

midterm exam
week 9: George Gordon Byron –
excerpts from Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage
week 10:
Byron continued – excerpts from Don Juan , “Prometheus”, “Fare Thee Well”
week 11: Percy Bysshe Shelley
– “Ozymandias”, “Ode to the West Wind”
week 12:
Shelley continued – “To a Skylark”, excerpts from “A Defence of Poetry”, “Prometheus Unbound”
week 13: John Keats:
“To Autumn”, “La Belle Dame Sans Merci”
week 14:
Keats continued – “Ode to a Nightingale”, “Ode on a Grecian Urn”
week 15. : final exam and final paper

READING LIST:

Primary literature:
Curran, Stuart (ed.): The Cambridge Companion to British Romanticism (Cambridge:
Cambridge UP, 1998)
Roe, Nicholas. Romanticism: An Oxford Guide (Oxford: Oxford UP, 2005)
Wu, Duncan. Romanticism: An Anthology (3rd edition) (Oxford: Blackwell, 2006)
Wu, Duncan: A Companion to Romanticism (Oxford: Blackwell, 2001)

Secondary literature:
Abrams, M. H.: The Mirror and the Lamp: Romantic Theory and the Critical
Tradition (London: Oxford UP, 1960)
Abrams, M. H.: Natural Supernaturalism: Tradition and Revolution in Romantic
Literature (London: Oxford UP, 1971)
Ashfield, Andrew and Peter de Bolla. The Sublime: A Reader in British Eighteenth-Century
Aesthetic Theory (Cambridge and New York: Cambridge UP, 1996)
Bainbridge, Simon (ed.) Romanticism: A Sourcebook (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2008)
Bennett, Andrew: Romantic Poets and the Culture of Posterity (Cambridge UP, 1999)
Bloom, Harold: The Visionary Company: A Reading of English Romantic Poetry
(London: Cornell UP, any edition)
Bone, Drummond: The Cambridge Companion to Byron (Cambridge UP, 2004)
Bromwich, David: Disowned by Memory: Wordsworth’s Poetry of the 1790s (Chicago and
London: The University of Chicago Press, 2000)
Butler, Marilyn: Romantics, Rebels and Reactionaries – English Literature and its
Background 1760-1830 (Oxford, New York: Oxford UP, 1981)
Day, Aidan: Romanticism (London and New York: Routledge, 1996)
de Man, Paul: The Rhetoric of Romanticism (New York: Columbia UP, 1984)
Duffy, Cian. Shelley and the Revolutionary Sublime (Cambridge UP, 2005)
Duffy, Cian and Peter Howell (ed.) Cultures of the Sublime (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011)
Erdman, David: Blake : Prophet against Empire (New York : Dover, 1991)
Gill, Stephen: The Cambridge Companion to Wordsworth (Cambridge UP, 2003)
Hartman, Geoffrey: Wordsworth’s Poetry 1787-1813 (Harvard UP, 1987)
Lucas, John. William Blake: Longman Critical Reader (New York: Longman, 1998)
Mellor, Anne K.: Romanticism and Gender (Routledge, 1993)
Morton, Timothy: The Cambridge Companion to Shelley (Cambridge UP, 2006)
Newlyn, Lucy: The Cambridge Companion to Coleridge (Cambridge UP, 2002)
Pfau, Thomas and Robert F. Gleckner (ed.) Lessons of Romanticism (Durham and London:
Duke UP, 1998)
Roe, Nicholas. Wordsworth and Coleridge: The Radical Years (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2003)
Scrivener, Michael Henry. Radical Shelley (Princeton: Princeton UP, 1982)
Simpson, David. Wordsworth’s Historical Imagination (New York and London: Methuen, 1987)
White, R.S. Natural Rights and the Birth of Romanticism in the 1790s (New York: Palgrave
Macmillan, 2005)
Wolfson, Susan: The Cambridge Companion to Keats (Cambridge UP, 2001)

 

 

 

Contemporary American Novel

Course title: Contemporary American Novel
Instructor
: Prof. Stipe Grgas

ECTS credits: 6
Status:
elective

Semester: 3rd and 5th or 4th and 6th
Enrollment requirements:
enrollment in the 3rd and 5th or 4th and 6th semester
Course description:
The course explores a number of novels which have been published since 9/11. The argument for targeting this body of texts derives from the notion that the contemporary or the “now” of the United States dates from this event. The course attempts to describe the form of the novel in contemporary US writing, the manner in which it reflects the present moment in US history and the way it engages the challenges of present reality.

Objectives: The purpose of the course is to develop the student’s ability to approach literary texts and to broaden their perspectives on the complexity of US reality.
Course requirements: continual attendance, oral presentation, written assignment, written final exam

Week by week schedule: the event, the present, 9/11 and its representations, American myths and their literary representations, the new regionalism, the city and capital, the sense of the ending

Reading List:
Thomas Pynchon, Inherent Vice
Steve Erickson, Shadowbahn
Cormac McCarthy, No Country for Old Men
Don Delillo, Cosmopolis
Don DeLillo, „Hammer and Sickle“
Annie Proulx, „Tits Up in a Ditch“
Paul Beatty, The Sellout
Cormac McCarthy, The Road

 

Shakespeare (Brlek)

Course title: Shakespeare
Instructor:
Asst. Prof. Tomislav Brlek
ECTS credits:
6
Language:
English
Duration:
Semester 4 to 6
Status:
elective
Enrolment requirements:
completed Introduction to English Lit/Introduction to English Lit 1 and 2
Syllabus:
SHAKESPEARE

  1. Introduction
    • Eliot, “Introduction”
  2. A Midsummer Night’s Dream
    • Frye, On Shakespeare, 34-50
    • Girard, Theater of Envy, 29-79; 167-173; 234-242
  3. A Midsummer Night’s Dream
    • Kott, “Titania and the Ass’s Head,” ShOC, 171-190
    • Kott, “The Bottom Translation,” BT, 29-68
  4. The Tempest
    • Frye, On Shakespeare, 171-186
    • Kott, “Prospero’s Staff,” ShOC, 237-278
  5. The Tempest
    • Kott, “The Tempest, or Repetition,” BT, 69-106
    • McGuire, “Shakespeare’s Tempest: Rhetoric and Poetics”
  6. Measure for Measure
    • Frye, On Shakespeare, 140-153
    • Stevenson, “Design and Structure in Measure for Measure
  7. Measure for Measure
    • Kott, “Head for Maidenhead, Maidenhead for Head: The Structure of Exchange in Measure for Measure
    • Schanzer, “Measure for Measure
  8. Macbeth
    • Kott, “Macbeth or Death-Infected,” ShOC, 68-78
    • Byles, “Macbeth: Imagery of Destruction”
    • Nevo, “Macbeth,” TF, 214-257
  9. Macbeth
    • Knight, “Macbeth and the Metaphysic of Evil,” WF, 140-159
    • Knight, “The Milk of Concord,” IT, 125-153
    • Garber, “Macbeth: the Male Medusa,” GW, 116-165
  10. Richard III
    • Kott, “The Kings,” ShOC, 3-46
    • Campbell, “The Tragical Doings of King Richard III”
  11. Richard III
    • Rossiter, “Angel with Horns: the Unity of Richard III,” AwH, 1-22
    • Brooke, “Richard III (1593?)”
    • Garber, “Descanting on Deformity: Richard III and the Shape of History,” GW, 39-68
  12. Coriolanus
    • Knight, “The Royal Occupation,” IT, 154-198
    • Nevo, “Coriolanus,” TF, 356-404
  13. Coriolanus
    • Kott, “Coriolanus or Shakespearean Contradictions,” ShOC, 141-167
    • Rossiter, “Coriolanus,” AwH, 235-252
    • Brlek, “Ill Seen, Well Said”


READING LIST

Northrop Frye, On Shakespeare, ed. Robert Sandler (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1986)

Marjorie Garber, Shakespeare’s Ghost Writers: Literature as Uncanny Causality (London: Routledge, 1987; 2010) = GW

René Girard, A Theater of Envy: William Shakespeare (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991)

  1. Wilson Knight, The Wheel of Fire: Interpretations of Shakespearian Tragedy with three new essays (London: Methuen, 1930; 1962) = WF
  2. Wilson Knight, The Imperial Theme: Further Interpretations of Shakespeare’s Tragedies including the Roman Plays (London: Methuen, 1931; 1965) = IT

Jan Kott, Shakespeare Our Contemporary [1964], tr. Boleslaw Taborski (London: Routledge, 1991) =ShOC

Jan Kott, The Bottom Translation : Marlowe and Shakespeare and the Carnival tradition, tr. Daniela Miedzyrzecka and Lillian Vallee (Evanston, Ill.: Northwestern University Press, 1987) = BT

Ruth Nevo, Tragic Form in Shakespeare (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1972) = TF

A.P. Rossiter, Angel with Horns and Other Shakespeare Lectures, ed. Graham Storey (London: Longmans, 1962), = AwH

_______________________

Tomislav Brlek, “Ill Seen, Well Said (On the Uses of Rhetoric in Julius Caesar and Coriolanus),” Studia Romanica et Anglica Zagrabiensia 43 (1998): 161-171

Nicholas Brooke, “Richard III (1593?),” Shakespeare’s Early Tragedies (London: Methuen, 1968), 48-79

Joan M. Byles, “Macbeth: Imagery of Destruction,” American Imago 39(1982)2: 149-164

Lily B. Campbell, “The Tragical Doings of King Richard III,” Shakespeare’s ‘Histories’: Mirrors of Elizabethan Policy (London: Methuen, 1947; 1964), 306-334

T.S. Eliot, “Introduction” in Knight, WF, xiii-xx

Jan Kott, “Head for Maidenhead, Maidenhead for Head: The Structure of Exchange in Measure for Measure,” Theater Quarterly 8.31 (1978): 18-24

Jerry D. McGuire, “Shakespeare’s Tempest: Rhetoric and Poetics,” American Imago 39 (1982)3: 219-37

Ernest Schanzer, “Measure for Measure,” The Problem Plays of Shakespeare (Routledge, 1963), 71-131

L. Stevenson, “Design and Structure in Measure for Measure,” Shakespeare: Measure for Measure: A Casebook, ed. C.K. Stead (London; Macmillan, 1971), 213-232

 

 

African American Literature: 1800-Present

Course title: African American Literature: 1800-Present
Instructor: Prof. Mark Metzler Sawin, PhD (visiting scholar)

ECTS credits: 6
Language: English
Duration: Semester 4, 6 summer – CONDENSED COURSE, March-April 2017
Status: elective
Enrolment requirements: completed Introduction to English Lit/Introduction to English Lit 1 and 2

____________________________________________________________________________________

download syllabus (.PDF)

COURSE DESCRIPTION & OBJECTIVES:
In the first chapter of his monumental work The Souls of Black Folk (1903) W.E.B. Du Bois wrote: …the Negro is a sort of seventh son, born with a veil, and gifted with second-sight in this American world,—a world which yields him no true self-consciousness, but only lets him see himself through the revelation of the other world. It is a peculiar sensation, this double-consciousness, this sense of always looking at one’s self through the eyes of others, of measuring one’s soul by the tape of a world that looks on in amused contempt and pity. One ever feels his two-ness,—an American, a Negro; two souls, two thoughts, two unreconciled strivings; two warring ideals in one dark body, whose dogged strength alone keeps it from being torn asunder.

The history of the American Negro is the history of this strife,—this longing to attain self-conscious manhood, to merge his double self into a better and truer self. In this merging he wishes neither of the older selves to be lost. He would not Africanize America, for America has too much to teach the world and Africa. He would not bleach his Negro soul in a flood of white Americanism, for he knows that Negro blood has a message for the world. He simply wishes to make it possible for a man to be both a Negro and an American, without being cursed and spit upon by his fellows, without having the doors of Opportunity closed roughly in his face. This, then, is the end of his striving: to be a co-worker in the kingdom of culture, to escape both death and isolation, to husband and use his best powers and his latent genius.

This course is a study of African American literature and culture through the 19th and 20th centuries and up to today, however, if it succeeds, it will go far deeper than this, becoming an insightful investigation of the “double consciousness” that Du Bois alluded to over 110 years ago. Themes for this course will include the Construction of Race, Slavery, Emancipation, Jim Crow, Lynching, Jazz, Urbanization, the Harlem Renaissance, Desegregation, Civil Rights, R&B & Rock n’ Roll, the Sports and Entertainment Industries, Victimization, White-guilt, Political Correctness, Affirmative Action, and Hip-Hop Culture.

Because of its combined literary and cultural foci, the methodology of this course will be somewhat unconventional, using not only literary texts and documents, but also many cultural creations (film, music, etc.) to examine the story of Black America. This is necessary because this subject is complex and culturally loaded—the construction, enforcement, reconstruction, and slow transformation of “Black” and “White” America is at the center of the dynamic tension that has driven much of American history, from the ravages of Slavery and the Civil War to the creation of the amazing and distinctive African American culture that heavily impacts the global culture of the 21st century. Each week will include a lecture on the context & culture of Black America for the given era, and then a discussion of the assigned text. Learning to examine, explain, and understand the vibrant literary and cultural creations of Black America is the goal of this course.

EVALUATION: Reading Responses: During this class you will be responsible for seven Reading Responses — one for each of the 7 weeks we meet. These should be at least 1000 words and I will expect an insightful analysis of the work written in clean, crisp, concise prose. I will drop the lowest scoring response. Class Participation: You will all be expected to attend each lecture, to read each assigned text well, and to actively participate in class discussions.

ASSIGNMENTS & SCORING
Reading Responses (6 x 15%) = 90% Class Participation = 10%
Grades will be based on a ten-point scale: 5 = 100-90% 4 = 89-80% 3 = 79-70% 2 = 69-60% 1 = 59-0%
Assignments turned in late will be penalized 10%
TEXTS: (the course will consider the following texts—students will address one selection from each section)

Week 1. Slavery & the American Civil War
– Folktales & Spirituals (early 1800s)
– Martin Delany. The Condition, Elevation, Emigration & Destiny of the Colored People of the United States (selections) (1852)
– Frederick Douglass. My Bondage and My Freedom (selections) (1855)
– Harriet Jacobs. Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (selections) (1861)
– Sojourner Truth. “Ar’n’t I a Woman?” (1864)
Week 2. Reconstruction & the Rise & Fall of Black Rights
– Charles Chesnutt. “The Wife of His Youth” (1898)
– Booker T. Washington. “The Atlanta Exposition Address” (1895)
– W.E.B. Du Bois. The Souls of Black Folk (selections) (1903)
Week 3. Segregated America
– James Weldon Johnson. Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man (1912)
Week 4. The Harlem Renaissance
– Poetry of the Harlem Renaissance (1920s)
– Langston Hughes. The Big Sea (selections)
– King Vidor film. Hallelujah! (1929)
Week 5. The Civil Rights Era
– Ralph Ellison. Invisible Man (selections) (1952)
– Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, & Stokely Carmichael (selections) (1960s)
– Poetry of the Black Arts Era (1960-70s)
Week 6. All Funked Up: Hip Hop America
– Blaxploitation film. Shaft (1971)
– Early Hip Hop film. Wild Style (1983)
– Spike Lee film. Do the Right Thing (1989)
– John Singleton film. Boyz n the Hood (1991)
– Spike Lee film. Bamboozled (2000)
Week 7. Black Lives Matter?!: Race in America Today
– Ta-Nehisi Coates. Between the World & Me (2015)

 

Ethics and Aesthetics of British Modernism (archive 16/17)

Naziv kolegija: Ethics and Aesthetics of British Modernism
Instructor: Asst. Prof. Martina Domines Veliki
8/10 semester 2016/17

(or 4./6. semestar)
Language
: English

1 semester, summer
Status: izborni
Oblik nastave: 1 sat predavanja i 2 sat seminara tjedno
Uvjeti: Upisan 8./10. semestar
Ispit: Kontinuirano praćenje. Tijekom seminara studenti/ce trebaju izraditi jedan seminarski rad te ga prezentirati na satu. Rad u seminaru, seminarski rad te dva kolokvija konstitutivni su dio završne ocjene. Svi dijelovi ocjene moraju biti pozitivni da bi student/ica dobio/la zaključnu ocjenu.

Sadržaj: Na odabranom korpusu modernističkih tekstova analizirat ćemo osobine i tematiku modernizma. U završnom dijelu seminara usporedit ćemo modernizam s nekim djelima kasnijega razdoblja. – Audenovom pjesmom «U sjećanje na W. B. Yeatsa», Cunninghamovim romanom Sati i pripovijetkom iz Barnesove zbirke pripovijedaka Stol od četurnovine»

Cilj: Cilj kolegija je problemski pristupiti razdoblju modernizma. Uz upoznavanje dijela kanona britanskoga i irskoga modernizma, u kolegiju će se raspraviti i temeljna pitanja o ulozi književnosti. ali i njezinoj ulozi u artikulaciji osobnoga i nacionalnoga identiteta u tom razdoblju. U kolegiju ćemo se također upoznati s relevantnim kritičkim metodama za promišljanje modernizma (psihoanalitička, poststrukturalistička, feministička, postkolonijalna/kulturološka kritika).

British Romanticism: prose (archive)

Course title: British Romanticism: prose
Instructor: Martina Domines Veliki, PhD
ECTS credits: 6
Language: English
Duration: 4th or 6th, 8th or 10th semester
in ac. year 2016/17 4th or 6th semester

Status: elective
Course type: 1 hour of lecture, 2 hours of seminar
Enrollment requirements: enrollment in the 4th or 6th, 8th or 10th semester
Course description: This module aims to engage students at a high level of scholarly rigour with the key themes, ideas and concerns of British Romanticism and with the wider historical, cultural and political contexts out of which they emerged. We will depart from the socio-historical contexts (Scottish Enlightenment, French Revolution, women rights) and a selection of texts which were central for the lively public debates of the period. We will then continue with the representative prose texts covering the gothic novel, the Scottish historical novel and Romantic life-writing. Primary readings will be balanced with critical essays.

Course requirements: continuous assessment (midterm and final exam, final paper, class attendance and participation).

Weekly schedule:

  1. week: socio-historical context, from the Scottish Enlightenment to English Romanticism, excerpts from Edmund Burke: Reflections on the French Revolution, Thomas Paine: Rights of Man, Mary Wollstonecraft: A Vindication of the Rights of Women
  2. week: gothic novel – genre development (Horace Walpole (1764)The Castle of Otranto)
  3. week: Ann Radcliffe (1794) The Mysteries of Udolpho
  4. week: Marry Shelley (1818) Frankenstein
  1. week: Frankenstein, cont.; chosen scenes from the movie Frankenstein (2004) dir. Kenneth Branagh
  2. week: historical novel, Scottish national identity
  3. week: Sir Walter Scott (1814) Waverley
  4. week: Mid-term exam, academic writing skills, topics for seminar papers
  5. week: autobiography, Romantic confessional narratives (from St. Augustine to Jean-Jacques Rousseau)
  6. week: Thomas de Quincey (1821) Confessions of an English Opium-Eater
  7. week: Confessions of an English Opium-Eater, cont.
  8. week: James Hogg (1824) The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner
  9. week: Dorothy Wordsworth (1800) The Grasmere Journal
  10. week: final remarks
  11. week: End-term exam

Reading list:
Primary literature:

Horace Walpole (1764), The Castle of Otranto
Ann Radcliffe (1794) The Mysteries of Udolpho
Marry Shelley (1818) Frankenstein
Sir Walter Scott (1814) Waverley
Thomas de Quincey (1821) Confessions of an English Opium-Eater
James Hogg (1824) The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner
Dorothy Wordsworth (1800) The Grasmere Journal

+

Reader with selected critical essays

Secondary literature:

– Anderson, Linda. Autobiography. New York & London: Routlege, 2001
– Broadie, Alexander. The Scottish Enlightenment: The Historical Age of the Historical Nation. Birlinn, 2001.
– Clery, E. J. Women’s Gothic: from Clara Reeve to Mary Shelley. Tavistock, 2004
– Crawford, Robert (ed.). The Scottish Invention of English Literature. Cambridge UP, 1998
– De Groot, Jerome. The historical novel. London, New York: Routledge, 2010
– Duncan, Ian. Scott’s Shadow: the novel in Romantic Edinburgh. Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2007
– Eakin, Paul John. How are lives become stories: making selves. Ithaca, London: Cornell University Press, 1999
Olney, James. Memory and Narrative: the weave of life-writing. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2000
– Punter, David (ed.) A Companion to the Gothic. Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, 2008
– Smith, Joanna M. (ed.) Frankenstein: complete authoritative text with biographical and historical contexts, critical history and essays from five contemporary critical perspectives. Boston: Bedford Books of St Martin’s Press, 1992
– Smith, Sidonie, Julia Watson (eds.) Women, Autobiography, Theory: a Reader. Madison: Unversity of Wisconsin Press, 1998
Townshend, Dale. The Orders of Gothic: Foucault, Lacan and the subject of Gothic writing, 1764 – 1820. New York: AMS Press, 2007

 

American Poetry From the Beginnings to the Twentieth Century

Professor Russell Reising
Office B-008
Office hours: from March 3, Thursday 14:00-15:00, Friday 12:00-13:00
Email: russreising@gmail.com
Phone: 99 7952930 (Not after 10 PM or before 9 AM!)
All poems indicated are easily available online. Use links I have provided when possible.

March 3-4
Introduction and business

TEACHING STRATEGIES AND COURSE POLICIES/COURSE EXPECTATIONS:
I approach my literature course with two primary goals: to teach certain works of literature (subject matter) and to help students improve their reading, writing, and analytical skills. In my opinion, the second of these goals is the real function of my presentations and our class discussions. Students who are not dedicated to improving these skills rarely do well in my classes. Students who are passionate about their studies will find that I am willing to go to extraordinary lengths to help, focus, provoke, challenge, and inspire you. Students who do not do the work will find that I have little patience or respect for those who squander their educational opportunities. Even if the particular subject matter we are studying does not greatly interest you, use the course to improve your communication and analytical skills.
I expect students to have finished all readings by the first class for which they are assigned, and I expect students to have given some thought to these works’ primary themes, mysteries, styles, etc. before coming to class. Students who have done these two things do much better in my classes than do students who don’t. I do not regard it as my responsibility to explain our works to students who haven’t done the reading. I do not accept late papers!
I assume you all know the plot, and, unless you tell me otherwise, I will assume you have a comfortable understanding of the work on the literal level. It is completely up to students to ask questions about works and/or issues that trouble or elude them. I would love it if each class could be spent with me responding to students’ questions, problems, provocations, etc. I believe that students who struggle with the meanings of works of literature and try out their own interpretive ideas learn much more than do students who sit back and simply expect to have the materials explained. That might do in some courses or in some disciplines; I can’t imagine it being responsible pedagogy or student behavior in upper-division literature courses.
I will very rarely spend time discussing the biographical and/or historical contexts of the works we study unless they bear directly on the discussions we are having or on the analytical points I want to make. Nor should students spend time in their formal essays simply rehearsing the biography of the author or some irrelevant historical data. My courses stress issues much more than they do historical or biographical factoids. Given the richness of many internet sources for such information, I regard it as irresponsible to waste your time with insignificant details that anyone can easily find with a well-focused google search! This is not to say that students aren’t encouraged to probe the biographical or historical contexts of our materials, only that I won’t dwell inordinately on them unless they are truly germane to our approach.
I tend not to use highly organized class notes for our discussions, as I try to make each class responsive to students’ needs. This results in class discussions that some students find less organized than those they are used to or prefer. All students, therefore, are strongly encouraged to ask questions as they arise and also to take good notes.
I do not assign topics for your formal essays, but I will help you in any way necessary as you formulate and refine your topics and approaches. I believe that struggling with the material, coming up with a topic, refining that topic, and then writing and revising a paper are all crucial elements in how/what students learn when they approach a writing assignment. Professors who assign specific topics are simply giving so many take home essay exam assignments. I believe that people all learn in many different ways, reading the assigned works of literature, consulting secondary sources, participating in class discussions, and in all facets of composing a formal essay. Some students like to join in class discussions and/or ask questions; others prefer quietly processing what goes on in class. I try to make room for all learning styles, but I do, as I say above, expect students to work hard and to complete all the assignments on time.

Russ’s World Weary Guidelines for Writers of Academic Papers
(These guidelines constitute the basis of what I expect in your written work!)
1. Unless instructed otherwise, you should assume that your audience knows the work you are writing about at the literal level, but that they can be enlightened about important themes, characters, interconnections, and other significant stylistic elements in the work. As a writer, you reveal something not obvious about the work(s) you write about. Plot summary is almost never good, and almost the only times you should be discussing the plot of the work is to provide evidence for the analytical point you are making.
2. A good, analytical essay will begin with a thesis section in which you articulate what you are writing about and provide some sense of what is significant about the position you will be advancing. A good thesis is argumentative, i.e., it advances a position that is debatable and not merely obvious to any one who has experienced the same work of art. A good thesis teaches your reader what to expect and pay attention to, and it helps guide and discipline your own writing. Think of it as a contract between you and your reader, committing you to perform a specific analytical task.
3. A good conclusion should never merely repeat the “main points” of your paper. Repetition and redundancy rarely characterize a good conclusion. Read almost any substantial article in almost any quality periodical; their conclusions NEVER merely repeat, summarize, or restate their main points. A good conclusion should sound conclusive, not repetitious! Good conclusions can do many things; experiment with different ways of “concluding” your paper on a strong note, not with a throw-away paragraph that merely repeats what you have already done.
4. An analytical essay should represent the highest level of sophistication and specificity you have reached in your consideration of a work. In other words, it should report your conclusions, not your “thinking in progress.” You should never include passages that merely rehearse your encounters with the poem, as in:

“When I first read this poem, I thought it meant X, but, after deeper reading and more careful consideration, I now believe it means Y.”

This might be an accurate history of your experience with the poem/novel/story/ play/film/song/etc., and it might well be an important consideration as you plan your paper, but it has no place in a finished, formal essay. Similarly, almost all references to “I think,” “I feel,” “In my opinion,” etc. should be strictly avoided. They are useless.
5. I will evaluate your formal essays with attention to all possible elements of the written language, from the content to syntactic, grammatical, mechanical, organizational and other rhetorical elements of your work. Please note: error free writing is not necessarily good writing! Good writing will engage the reader with solid content, logical analysis, coherent organization at the paragraph and essay level, and with lively, varied sentences that don’t lull the reader with monotonous, repetitious words, sentence structures, sentence lengths, or ideas.
6. Most importantly, your essay should communicate your ideas about a work. Your thesis (not the “plot” of the work) will be the driving force of your paragraphs and of your entire essay. Most of your paragraphs should begin by indicating how this particular paragraph furthers the analytical thesis you advanced in your thesis/introductory section. Papers and paragraphs that begin with plot summary rarely do more than merely summarize.
7. I will fail any student who plagiarizes any work in this course, and I will pursue their expulsion from the university. If you have any doubt at all about what constitutes academic dishonesty, please contact me before turning in any work.

Russ’s Absolute Guidelines for Reading Poetry

1. For the purpose of this class, I am offering the following definition of poetry: Poetry is a kind of literary language that maximizes the meaning-creating potential of every single element of the text. This includes obvious things like the poem’s title, multiple word definitions, and grammar to line and stanza breaks, poetic techniques, rhymed words, etc. The shorter the poem, the more potentially volatile becomes every element within the poem.
2. “ Sometimes a bird is just bird!” Always begin by understanding the poem in the most literal and linear way possible. Make sure you can find some necessity, invitation, or some other plausible reason for moving from a literal understanding to any figurative or metaphorical interpretation of a poem. For example, if a poem mentions the word “big” and you believe that the god you believe in is “big,” that doesn’t mean that the word “big” can automatically be read as a reference to your god.
3. Always read the poem out loud to yourself and pay attention to how it allows itself to be read. For example, lots of punctuation or some alliterative chains of words require us to slow down, sometimes almost to a halt, while reading the poem. This will strongly alter our experience and interpretation of the poem. Also, try to formulate a good paraphrase of the “narrative” of the poem. Make sure you can follow its logic and story (if there is one).
4. Use your dictionaries, and pay close attention to the meaning(s) of every single word in the poem!!! You really need to understand every word of a poem to understand the poem. In the case of older poems, the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is an indispensable tool. Learn how to access and use it in the library or over the internet through the Carlson Library webpage.
5. If you have trouble reading poetry, pretend it isn’t a poem. Read it as though it were prose. Many students are surprised to learn that almost all poems follow the general syntactic rules of the English language. Start with a sentence-beginning capital letter and then find the final punctuation for that sentence. Granted, poems maximize the meaning-creating potential of those rules, but you can get a very clear sense of the poem’s literal/linear level by reading it as though it were prose. Forget about lines; forget about stanzas; forget about poetic techniques: just understand the poem in terms of its sentences. THEN move on to study and appreciate it more fully, i.e., more poetically.
6. Always try to understand the context of the poem. How is the historical context important? What kind of speaker might be uttering this poem, and under what kinds of circumstances? Don’t automatically assume that the “I” of the poem is identical with the poet, and don’t automatically assume that a woman poet writes from a woman’s point of view (ditto for male poets). Very few things restrict our analytical energies with poetry; however, what a poem “can” mean is limited by what words and phrases meant at the time the poem was written. For example, if Shakespeare uses the word “groovy,” he couldn’t possibly mean “cool” or “out of sight,” as he might have meant had he written in the 1960s.

March 10-11
Reading week

March 17-18
Puritan poetry and poetics
http://www.calvinistcorner.com/tulip.htm
From Mary Rowlandson’s captivity narrative:

Before I knew what affliction meant, I was ready to sometimes wish for it. When I lived in prosperity […] I should be sometimes jealous least I should have my portion in this life, and the Scripture would come to my mind, Heb, 12.6 For whom the Lord loveth he chasteneth, and scourgeth every Son whom he receiveth. But now I see the Lord had his time to scourge and chasten me. The portion of some is to have their afflictions by drops, now one drop then another; but the dregs of the Cup, the Wine of astonishment: like a sweeping rain that leaveth no food, did the Lord prepare for my portion. Affliction I wanted, and affliction I had, full measure (I thought) pressed down and running over; yet I see, when God calls a Person to any thing, and through never so many difficulties, yet he is fully able to carry them through and make them see, and say they have been gainers thereby. And I hope I can say in some measure, as David did, It is good for me that I have been afflicted. (112)

From Cotton Mather’s Wonders of the Invisible World:

Hence tis, that the Happiness of NewEngland, has been, but for a Time, as it was foretold, and not for a Long Time, as ha’s been desir’d for us. A Variety of Calamity ha’s long follow’d this Plantation; and we have all the Reason imaginable to ascribe it unto the Rebuke of Heaven upon us for our manifold Apostasies; we make no Right use of our Disasters, if we do not, Remember whence we are fallen, and Repent, and Do the first works. But yet our Afflictions may come under a further Consideration with us: there is a further cause of our Afflictions, whose Due must be Given him.

Poems by Anne Bradstreet:
“To My Dear and Loving Husband”
“The Author to Her Book”
“Upon the Burning our Our House”

Three Elegies:
In Memory of My Dear Grandchild Elizabeth Bradstreet, Who Deceased August, 1665, Being A Year and a Half Old

Farewell dear babe, my heart’s too much content,
Farewell sweet babe, the pleasure of mine eye,
Farewell fair flower that for a space was lent,
Then ta’en away unto eternity.
Blest babe, why should I once bewail thy fate,
Or sigh thy days so soon were terminate,
Sith thou art settled in an everlasting state.

By nature trees do rot they are grown,
And plums and apples thoroughly ripe do fall,
And corn and grass are in their season mown,
And time brings down what is both strong and tall.
But plants new set to be eradicate,
And buds new blown to have so short a date,
Is by His hand alone that guides nature and fate.

In Memory of My Dear Grandchild Anne Bradstreet, Who Deceased June 20, 1669, Being Three Years and Seven Months Old

With troubled heart and trembling hand I write,
The heavens have changed to sorrow my delight.
How oft with disapoinment have I met,
When I on fading things my hopes have set.
Experience might ‘fore this have made me wise,
To value things according to their price.
Was ever stable joy yet found below?
Or perfect bliss without mixture of woe?
I knew she was but as a withering flower,
That’s here today, perhaps gone in an hour;
Like as a bubble, or the brittle glass,
Or like a shadow turning as it was.
More fool then I to look on that was lent
As if mine own, when thus impermanent.
Farewell dear child, thou ne’er shall come to me,
But yet a while, and I shall go to thee;
Meantime my throbbing heart’s cheered up with this;
Thou with thy Savior art in endless bliss.

On My Dear Grandchild Simon Bradstreet, Who Died on 16 November, 1669, Being But a Month, and One Day Old

No sooner came, but gone, and fall’n asleep.
Acquaintance short, yet parting caused us weep;
Three flowers, two scarcely blown, the last i’ th’ bud,
Cropped by th’ Almighty’s hand; yet is He good.
With dreadful awe before Him let’s be mute,
Such was His will, but why, let’s not dispute,
With humble hearts and mouths put in the dust,
Let’s say He’s merciful as well as just.
He will return and make up all our losses,
And smile again after our bitter crosses.
Go pretty babe, go rest with sisters twain;
Among the blest in endless joys remain.

March 24-25
Puritan poetry and poetics, cont.d
Edward Taylor Poems:
“Upon a Wasp Chilled With Cold”
“Upon a Spider Catching a Fly”
“The Ebb and the Flow”
“Upon Wedlock and the Death of Children”
“Huswifery”

March 31/ April 1
Poems By Phillis Wheatley
http://docsouth.unc.edu/neh/wheatley/wheatley.html
This download has all her poems and a nice memoir about her. The poems we will focus on include:
“On Being Brought from Africa to America”
“On Imagination”
“An Hymn to the Morning”
“An Hymn to the Evening”
“On Recollection”
“On Virtue”

April 7-8
Wheatley, cont’d
Freneau
Philip Freneau, “To An Author”
To an Author
by Philip Freneau
Your leaves bound up compact and fair,
In neat array at length prepare,
To pass their hour on learning’s stage,
To meet the surly critic’s rage;
The statesman’s slight, the smatterer’s sneer–
Were these, indeed, your only fear,
You might be tranquil and resigned:
What most should touch your fluttering mind;
Is that, few critics will be found
To sift your works, and deal the wound.

Thus, when one fleeting year is past
On some bye-shelf your book is cast–
Another comes, with something new,
And drives you fairly out of view:
With some to praise, but more to blame,
The mind returns to–whence it came;
And some alive, who scarce could read
Will publish satires on the dead.

Thrice happy Dryden, who could meet
Some rival bard in every street!
When all were bent on writing well
It was some credit to excel:–

Thrice happy Dryden, who could find
A Milbourne for his sport designed–
And Pope, who saw the harmless rage
Of Dennis bursting o’er his page
Might justly spurn the critic’s aim,
Who only helped to swell his fame.

On these bleak climes by Fortune thrown,
Where rigid Reason reigns alone,
Where lovely Fancy has no sway,
Nor magic forms about us play–
Nor nature takes her summer hue
Tell me, what has the muse to do?–

An age employed in edging steel
Can no poetic raptures feel;
No solitude’s attracting power,
No leisure of the noon day hour,
No shaded stream, no quiet grove
Can this fantastic century move;

The muse of love in no request–
Go–try your fortune with the rest,
One of the nine you should engage,
To meet the follies of the age:–

On one, we fear, your choice must fall–
The least engaging of them all–
Her visage stern–an angry style–
A clouded brow–malicious smile–
A mind on murdered victims placed–
She, only she, can please the taste!

http://www.poetrynook.com/poem/author-2
“The Wild Honey-suckle”
“The Indian Burying Ground”

April 14-15

Bryant
William Cullen Bryant
“Thanatopsis”
“A Forest Hymn”
“Inscription for the Entrance to a Wood”
“To a Waterfowl”

April 21-22
Emerson
Essay: “The Poet”
Poems:
“Each and All”
“The Snow-Storm”
“Concord Hymn”
Whitman
http://www.poemhunter.com/walt-whitman/
“When I First Heard the Learned Astronomer”

April 28-29
Emily Dickinson
“’Faith’ is a fine invention”
“These are the days when birds come back”
“I know that He exists”
“This World is not Conclusion”
“I heard a fly buzz when I died”
“Those dying then”
“The bible is an antique volume”
“If you were coming in the fall”

May 5-6
Dickinson, cont’d
TBA

May 12-13
Dickinson, cont’d
TBA

May 19-20
Holiday, no classes

May 26-27
Stephen Crane
Frances Harper
Edgar Lee Masters
All TBA

June 2-3
Robert Frost
“Design”
“Desert Places”
“Mending Wall”
“Birches”
“Two Look at Tao”
“After Apple-Picking”
“Directive”

June 9-10
Frost, cont’d