Category Archives: KNJIŽEVNI SEMINARI – 3. ili 5. semestar

British Romanticism: poetry

Course title: British Romanticism: poetry
Course coordinator: Martina Domines Veliki, PhD
Instructor:
Martina Domines Veliki, PhD
ECTS credits: 6
Language: English
Duration: 1 semester (3rd or 5th, 4th or 6th semester)
Status: elective
Course type: 1 hour of lecture, 2 hours of seminar
Prerequisites: Introduction to English Literature or Introduction into English Lit 1 and 2, 3/5 or 4/6 semester enrollment
Course requirements: continuous assessment (midterm and final exam, final paper, class attendance and participation)

Objective: The students will be introduced to the major poets of English Romanticism, as well as their relevant historical, cultural, political and aesthetic milieu. The aim of this course is to encourage students to create their own view of the suggested array of poems through close reading. They will be asked to think about and analyze these poems with the help of a number of critical texts (from new historicist to post-structuralist ones).

 

American Women’s Writing in the Nineteenth Century

Course title: American Women’s Writing in the Nineteenth Century (A, 19. st.)
Winter 2018/2019
Mon, 8:45-9:30 (A-105)
Wed, 10:15-11:45 (A-105)
Instructor: Dr. Jelena Šesnić, Assoc. Prof.
E-mail: jsesnic@ffzg.hr
Phone: 01-4092060
Office: B-018
Office hours: Mon, 12:30-13:30 p.m.; Thur, 11-12 a.m.
ECTS credits: 6
Language: English

Prerequisites: Enrolment in the 3rd or 5th semester of the English Language program.

Course requirements: Regular attendance; assignments (oral and written); seminar paper (6-7 pp, ca 2500 words); continuous evaluation (a mid-term and a final test).

Course description: The course is an overview of representative texts by and about women in nineteenth-century America. In order better to contextualize the texts, we shall be looking at two earlier traditions informing writing by women that are mutually compatible rather than exclusionary. The one is represented by Rowlandson’s captivity narrative and situates a woman at the centre of the project of nation-building, while the other is exemplified by Rowson’s hugely popular sentimental/ seduction novel, from which the novel writing in the States takes off. Thus the feminine tradition appears to be crucial from the very beginning for the way the American nation describes and represents itself. This argument, however, becomes possible only in the wake of the strong intervention into the field of literary history and literary canon formation enacted by feminist, poststructuralist, new historicist and cultural critics from the 1970s onwards.

Required reading:

Novels/ narratives

  1. Mary Rowlandson: The Sovereignty and Goodness of God (1682)
  2. Susanna Rowson: Charlotte Temple (1791)
  3. Lydia Maria Child: Hobomok (1824)
  4. Harriet Jacobs: Incidents in the Life of a Slave-Girl (1861)
  5. Louisa May Alcott: Work: A Story of Experience (1873)
  6. Frances Harper: Iola Leroy (1893)

Syllabus
Week 1: General introduction. Introduction to Rowlandson.Mary Rowlandson’s captivity narrative as a formative national text; Richard Slotkin’s notion of „regeneration through violence“

Week 2: Analysis of cultural, political, ethical, and gendered implications of Rowlandson’s captivity

Week 3: Susanna Rowson’s novel as a representative and generative instance of the sentimental/ seduction novel

Week 4: Rowson’s novel in the context of transatlantic cultural exchange and sentimentalism

Week 5: L.M. Child’s Hobomok and the idea of cultural nationalism

Week 6: Hobomok as a revisionst text; politics of race and gender in the novel (Indian and female characters)

Week 7: Mid-term. Introduction to Jacobs’s slave narrative depicting her life in slavery

Week 8: Jacobs’s text in between the domestic, sentimental and seduction novels and representative masculine slave narratives

Week 9: Analysis of narrative and cultural strategies in conjunction with race and gender in Jacobs’s text.

Week 10: Alcott’s Work as a story of women’s emergence in the public sphere in a transforming society.

Week 11: Analysis of the novel’s accommodation of realism with the conventions of sentimentalism and women’s fiction.

Week 12: Harper’s Iola Leroy and the post-slavery, post-Reconstruction America. On-going influence of the domestic and sentimental fiction.

Week 13: Status and color distinction within the black community; Iola Leroy as a „tragic mulatta“ and the problem of passing.

Week 14: Final test. Student evaluation.

Secondary literature (required):
Castiglia, Christopher. Bound and Determined: Captivity, Culture-Crossing, and White Womanhood from Mary Rowlandson to Patty Hearst. Chicago, London: The U of Chicago P, 1996. (selection)

Elbert, Sarah. „Introduction.“ Work: A Story of Experience by Louisa May Alcott. Shocken Books: New York, 1977. Ix- xliv.

Foster, Frances S. Written by Herself: Literary Production by African American Women, 1746-1892. Bloomington, Indianapolis: Indiana UP, 1993. (selection)

Goddu, Teresa. Gothic America: Narrative, History, and Nation. New York: Columbia UP, 1997. (selection)

Grasso, Linda. The Artistry of Anger: Black and White Women’s Literature in America, 1820-1860. Chapel Hill, London: The U of North Carolina P, 2002. (selection)

Howard, June. «What Is Sentimentality?» American Literary History 11.1 (Spring 1990): 63-81.

Kaplan, Amy. «Manifest Domesticity». American Literature. No More Separate Spheres. 70.3 (September 1998): 581-606.

Nelson, Dana. The Word in Black and White: Reading ‘Race’ in American Literature, 1638-1867. New York, Oxford: Oxford UP, 1994. (selection)

Schloss, Dietmar. “Republicanism and Politeness in the Early American Novel”. Early America Re-Explored: Readings in Colonial, Early National, and Antebellum Culture. Eds. Fritz Fleischmann and Klaus H. Schmidt. New York: Peter Lang, 2000. 269-90.

Slotkin, Richard. Regeneration through Violence: the Mythology of the American Frontier, 1600-1800, Norman: U of Oklahoma P, 1973. (selection)

Welter, Barbara. „The Cult of True Womanhood: 1820-1860“. 1966. Locating American Studies: The Evolution of a Discipline. Ed. Lucy Maddox. Baltimore, London: The Johns Hopkins UP, 1999. 43-70.

Optional reading:
American Literature. No More Separate Spheres. 70.3 (Sept. 1998).

Armstrong, Nancy and Leonard Tennenhouse. „The Problem of Population and the Form of the American Novel“. American Literary History 20.4 (Winter 2008): 667-85.

Baym, Nina. «Women’s Novels and Women’s Minds: An Unsentimental View of Nineteenth-Century American Women’s Fiction». Novel: A Forum on Fiction 31.3 (Summer 1998): 335-50.

Carby, Hazel. Reconstructing Womanhood : The Emergence of the Afro-American Woman Novelist. New York, Oxford: Oxford UP, 1989.

Davidson, Cathy. Revolution and the Word: The Rise of the Novel in America. New York, Oxford: Oxford UP, 1986. (selection)

Douglas, Ann. The Feminization of American Culture. 1977. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1998.

Elbert, Monika, ed. Separate Spheres No More: Gender Convergence in American Literature, 1830-1930. Tuscaloosa, London: The U of Alabama P, 2000.

Hendler, Glenn. Public Sentiments: Structures of Feeling in Nineteenth-Century American Literature. Chapel Hill, London: The U of North Carolina P, 2001.

Karcher, Carolyn. «Reconceiving Nineteenth-Century American Literature: The Challenge of Women Writers». American Literature 66.4 (Dec. 1994): 781-93.

Kelley, Mary. Private Women, Public Stage: Literary Domesticity in Nineteenth-Century America. New York, Oxford: Oxford UP, 1984.

Kilcup, Karen, ed. Soft Canons: American Women Writers and Masculine Tradition. Iowa City: U of Iowa P, 1999.

Maddock Dillon, Elizabeth. «Sentimental Aesthetics». American Literature 76.3 (September 2004): 495-523.

Merish, Lori. Sentimental Materialism: Gender, Commodity Culture, and Nineteenth-Century American Literature. Durham, London: Duke UP, 2000.

Moon, Michael and Cathy Davidson, eds. Subjects and Citizens: Nation, Race, and Gender from Oronooko to Anita Hill, Duke UP, Durham and London, 1995.

Romero, Lora. Home Fronts: Domesticity and Its Critics in the Antebellum United States. Durham, London: Duke UP, 1997.

Samuels, Shirley, ed. The Culture of Sentiment: Race, Gender, and Sentimentality in Nineteenth-Century America. New York, Oxford: Oxford UP, 1992.

Showalter, Elaine. Sister’s Choice: Tradition and Change in American Women’s Writing. Oxford: Clarendon P, 1991.

Šesnić, Jelena. Mračne žene. Prikazi ženstva u američkoj književnosti (1820.-1860.). Zagreb: Leykam International, 2010.

Tate, Claudia. «Allegories of Black Female Desire; or, Rereading Nineteenth-Century Sentimental Narratives of Black Female Authority». Changing Our Own Words: Essays on Criticism, Theory, and Writings by Black Women. Ed. Cheryl Wall. New Brunswick, London: Rutgers UP, 1991. 98-126.

Tawil, Ezra. „Domestic Frontier Romance, or, How the Sentimental Heroine Became White“. Novel: A Forum on Fiction 32.1 (Fall 1998): 99-124.

Tompkins, Jane. Sensational Designs: The Cultural Work of American Fiction, 1790-1860. New York, Oxford: Oxford UP, 1985.

Warren, Joyce, ed. The (Other) American Traditions: Nineteenth-Century Women Writers. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers UP, 1993.

The Nineteenth-Century American Novel

Course title: The Nineteenth-Century American Novel (A, 19)
Mon, 8.45-9.30 (A-105); Wed, 9.30-11.00 (A-105)
Instructor: Dr. Jelena Šesnić
ECTS: 6
Language: English
Duration: Semester 3 to 6
Status: elective
Requirements: Introduction into the Study of English Literature 1 & 2

Course description: The novel figures as one of the key literary genres in the development of US national literature. The course proposes to chart a development and diversification of the American novel in the nineteenth century as it sustains the idea of American specificity on one hand, while, on the other, reflects derivation from and postcolonial cultural dependence on the European (English) literary models. The growing sense of American cultural consciousness will be traced on the exemplary novels that are still important cultural landmarks. In addition, the development of the novel suggests changes of literary styles and periods ranging from neo-classicist to romantic to realist and beyond. At the same time, these novels exemplify the most common sub-genres of the American novel at the time.
The proposed primary texts include: Herman Melville’s Moby Dick (1851; romance/ the philosophical novel; with some omissions); E . A. Poe’s The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym (1838; the adventure/ gothic novel); Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin (1852; the sentimental novel); and William Dean Howells’ The Rise of Silas Lapham (1885; the realist novel).
Syllabus (alterations possible)
Week 1: American literature as a postcolonial form (Buell); Emerson’s idea of an American author in “The Poet”
Week 2: Jehlen, the novel and the middle class; Chase, the romance and the novel, the idea of an “American tradition”; Melville: Moby-Dick
Week 3: Moby-Dick (cont.); Melville in the context of his times (letters to Hawthorne; “Hawthorne and His Mosses”); Moby-Dick as the great American novel (Buell)

Week 4: Moby-Dick (cont.)
Week 5: Edgar Allan Poe: The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym; the romance and the gothic tradition; Hawthorne’s prefaces
Week 6: Pym (cont.); Goddu: the gothic, whiteness and blackness
Week 7: Pym (cont.)
Week 8: Mid-term test.
Week 9: Harriet Beecher Stowe: Uncle Tom’s Cabin; the sentimental intervention; reform and politics vs art and literature?; the American novel and slavery
Week 10: Uncle Tom’s Cabin (cont.); Jane Tompkins and the “other” American Renaissance
Week 11: Uncle Tom’s Cabin (cont.)
Week 12: WD Howells: The Rise of Silas Lapham; the problem of “American realism” (Howells, Twain)
Week 13: The Rise (cont.); Henry James’s selected prefaces; from James’s The American Scene
Week 14: The Rise (cont.)

Week 15: Final test. Student evaluation.

A. Primary readings:

Novels:
Herman Melville: Moby-Dick (with some omissions)
E.A. Poe: The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym
Harriet Beecher Stowe: Uncle Tom’s Cabin
William Dean Howells: The Rise of Silas Lapham

Prefaces, manifestoes, criticism, reviews:
W. Emerson: “The Poet”

Nathaniel Hawthorne: Prefaces (selection)
William Dean Howells: “A Call for Realism”
Henry James: The Art of the Novel (selection); The American Scene (selection)
Herman Melville: “Hawthorne and His Mosses”
Mark Twain: “James Fenimore Cooper’s Literary Offenses”

Buell, Lawrence. “The Unkillable Dream of the Great American Novel: Moby-Dick as Test Case”. American Literary History 20. 1-2 (Spring-Summer 2008): 132-55.
Chase, Richard. The American Novel and Its Tradition. New York: Doubleday Anchor Books, 1957. 1-28.
Goddu, Teresa. Gothic America: Narrative, History, and Nation. New York: Columbia UP, 1997. (selection)
Hamilton, Geordie. “Rethinking the Politics of American Realism Through the Narrative Form and Moral Rhetoric of W.D. Howells’ The Rise of Silas Lapham”. American Literary Realism 42.1 (Fall 2009): 13-35.
Jehlen, Myra. “The Novel and the Middle Class in America”. Ideology and Classic American Literature. Eds. Sacvan Bercovitch and Myra Jehlen. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1986. 125-44.
Tompkins, Jane. Sensational Designs: The Cultural Work of American Fiction, 1790-1860. New York, Oxford: Oxford UP, 1985. 122-46.

B. Supplementary readings:

Buell, Lawrence. “American Literary Emergence as a Postcolonial Phenomenon”. American Literary History 4.3 (Autumn 1992): 411-42.
Castronovo, Russ. Beautiful Democracy: Aesthetics and Anarchy in a Global Era. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 2007. (selection)
Fisher, Philip. Hard Facts: Setting and Form in the American Novel. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1986. (selection)
Frye, Northrop. Anatomy of Criticism. Princeton: Princeton UP, 1957. (selection)
Marx, Leo. The Machine in the Garden: Technology and the Pastoral Ideal in America. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1964. (selection)
Pease, Donald E., ed. New Essays on The Rise of Silas Lapham. New York: Cambridge UP, 1991.

Requirements: regular attendance and active participation in the seminar (10% of the grade); in-class and home assignments (10 %); written tests (mid-term and final: 50 %; continuous assessment, mandatory); seminar paper (6-7 double-spaced pages, MLA style, 30 %)

 

 

British Romanticism: poetry (archive)

Course title: British Romanticism: poetry
(Former course title: English Romantic Poetry)
Course coordinator: Martina Domines Veliki, PhD
Instructor:
Martina Domines Veliki, PhD
ECTS credits: 6
Language: English
Duration: 1 semester (3rd or 5th, 4th or 6th semester)
Status: elective
Course type: 1 hour of lecture, 2 hours of seminar
Prerequisites: Introduction to English Literature or Introduction into English Lit 1 and 2, 3/5 or 4/6 semester enrollment
Course requirements: continuous assessment (midterm and final exam, final paper, class attendance and participation)

Objective: The students will be introduced to the major poets of English Romanticism, as well as their relevant historical, cultural, political and aesthetic milieu. The aim of this course is to encourage students to create their own view of the suggested array of poems through close reading. They will be asked to think about and analyze these poems with the help of a number of critical texts (from new historicist to post-structuralist ones).

Course description: Authors we will read include Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley and Keats. Through reading of their representative poetry we will tackle some fundamental Romantic concepts such as poetic inspiration, memory of the past events, the sublime, deism and mysticism, the relationship between the poetic subject and nature as well as the role played by language. The poetic subject becomes the central topic of most Romantic poetry and it is actualized through a close relationship with nature that acts as either a consoling or a debilitating force. Priority will be given to the Romantic poets of the first generation. These poets often imagine themselves to be responding to the French Revolution. They rebel against social injustice, cherishing feelings for ‘common’ people and believing, in the words of Shelley, that they are indeed the acknowledged ‘legislators of the world’.

Weekly schedule:
week 1:
Introduction into English Romanticism. Historical background.

week 2: William Blake – selections from Songs of Innocence and Experience
week 3:
Blake continued – “The Marriage of Heaven and Hell”
week 4:
William Wordsworth – excerpts from the 1800 Preface to Lyrical Ballads, a selection of poems from Lyrical Ballads
week 5:
Wordsworth continued: a selection of poems from Poems in Two Volumes
week 6:
Wordsworth continued – The Prelude (chosen books)
week 7: Samuel Taylor Coleridge
– selections from Biographia Literaria
week 8:
Coleridge continued – “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner”, “Dejection: an Ode”, “Kubla Khan”

midterm exam
week 9: George Gordon Byron –
excerpts from Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage
week 10:
Byron continued – excerpts from Don Juan , “Prometheus”, “Fare Thee Well”
week 11: Percy Bysshe Shelley
– “Ozymandias”, “Ode to the West Wind”
week 12:
Shelley continued – “To a Skylark”, excerpts from “A Defence of Poetry”, “Prometheus Unbound”
week 13: John Keats:
“To Autumn”, “La Belle Dame Sans Merci”
week 14:
Keats continued – “Ode to a Nightingale”, “Ode on a Grecian Urn”
week 15. : final exam and final paper

READING LIST:

Primary literature:
Curran, Stuart (ed.): The Cambridge Companion to British Romanticism (Cambridge:
Cambridge UP, 1998)
Roe, Nicholas. Romanticism: An Oxford Guide (Oxford: Oxford UP, 2005)
Wu, Duncan. Romanticism: An Anthology (3rd edition) (Oxford: Blackwell, 2006)
Wu, Duncan: A Companion to Romanticism (Oxford: Blackwell, 2001)

Secondary literature:
Abrams, M. H.: The Mirror and the Lamp: Romantic Theory and the Critical
Tradition (London: Oxford UP, 1960)
Abrams, M. H.: Natural Supernaturalism: Tradition and Revolution in Romantic
Literature (London: Oxford UP, 1971)
Ashfield, Andrew and Peter de Bolla. The Sublime: A Reader in British Eighteenth-Century
Aesthetic Theory (Cambridge and New York: Cambridge UP, 1996)
Bainbridge, Simon (ed.) Romanticism: A Sourcebook (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2008)
Bennett, Andrew: Romantic Poets and the Culture of Posterity (Cambridge UP, 1999)
Bloom, Harold: The Visionary Company: A Reading of English Romantic Poetry
(London: Cornell UP, any edition)
Bone, Drummond: The Cambridge Companion to Byron (Cambridge UP, 2004)
Bromwich, David: Disowned by Memory: Wordsworth’s Poetry of the 1790s (Chicago and
London: The University of Chicago Press, 2000)
Butler, Marilyn: Romantics, Rebels and Reactionaries – English Literature and its
Background 1760-1830 (Oxford, New York: Oxford UP, 1981)
Day, Aidan: Romanticism (London and New York: Routledge, 1996)
de Man, Paul: The Rhetoric of Romanticism (New York: Columbia UP, 1984)
Duffy, Cian. Shelley and the Revolutionary Sublime (Cambridge UP, 2005)
Duffy, Cian and Peter Howell (ed.) Cultures of the Sublime (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011)
Erdman, David: Blake : Prophet against Empire (New York : Dover, 1991)
Gill, Stephen: The Cambridge Companion to Wordsworth (Cambridge UP, 2003)
Hartman, Geoffrey: Wordsworth’s Poetry 1787-1813 (Harvard UP, 1987)
Lucas, John. William Blake: Longman Critical Reader (New York: Longman, 1998)
Mellor, Anne K.: Romanticism and Gender (Routledge, 1993)
Morton, Timothy: The Cambridge Companion to Shelley (Cambridge UP, 2006)
Newlyn, Lucy: The Cambridge Companion to Coleridge (Cambridge UP, 2002)
Pfau, Thomas and Robert F. Gleckner (ed.) Lessons of Romanticism (Durham and London:
Duke UP, 1998)
Roe, Nicholas. Wordsworth and Coleridge: The Radical Years (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2003)
Scrivener, Michael Henry. Radical Shelley (Princeton: Princeton UP, 1982)
Simpson, David. Wordsworth’s Historical Imagination (New York and London: Methuen, 1987)
White, R.S. Natural Rights and the Birth of Romanticism in the 1790s (New York: Palgrave
Macmillan, 2005)
Wolfson, Susan: The Cambridge Companion to Keats (Cambridge UP, 2001)

 

 

 

Aspects of American Romanticism

Dr Jelena Šesnić
Literary Seminar (2nd/3rd year): Aspects of American Romanticism (A, 19th c.)
Winter 2019/2020
Mon, 8:45-9:30 (A-105)
Wed, 10:15-11:45 (A-105)
Office: B-018
Phone: 4092060
E-mail: jsesnic@ffzg.hr

Office hours: Mon, 12:30-13:30; Thur 11-12

Course description: The period spans the decades from the 1820s to approximately the 1860s marked by the flowering of national literature in post-revolutionary times; the adoption and americanization of European ideas in so-called New England Transcendentalism, and the emergence of alternative (women, African Americans, commoners) voices. Alternatively called the American Renaissance, the period testifies to the coming-of-age of American literature. The texts are a representative selection of the unprecedented surge of creative energy that left no aspect of social and personal life untouched (from religion, education, women’s rights to politics and abolition), and will thus guide is in our examination of the past to which the American present owes so much.

Requirements: regular attendance; participation in class discussions; in-class and home assignments; seminar paper 6-7 pp. (ca 2000 words); mid-term + final test (continuous assessment, mandatory)

Selected works:

R.W. Emerson: selection of essays
Walt Whitman: Leaves of Grass (poetry, selection)
Henry David Thoreau: Walden (selection); selected essays
Margaret Fuller: Woman in the Nineteenth Century (essay)
Catharine Maria Sedgwick: Hope Leslie (novel)
Frederick Douglass: Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave
Herman Melville: Typee (novel; selection)

Readings (alterations possible)

October

Week 1: Introduction: key concepts; lit-historical context

Week 2: Emerson: selected essays („The American Scholar“, „Self-Reliance“)

Week 3: Emerson: „The Poet“; Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass (selection)

Week 4: Thoreau: Walden (selected chapters)

Week 5: Thoreau: Walden (selected chapters)

November

Week 1: Thoreau: „Civil Disobedience“, „A Plea for Captain John Brown“ (essays)

Week 2: Fuller: „Autobiographical romance“, „Self-definitions“ (excerpts)

Fuller: Woman in the Nineteenth-Century

Week 3: Fuller: Woman. *Mid-term.*

Week 4: Sedgwick: Hope Leslie

December

Week 1: Sedgwick: Hope Leslie

Week 2: Douglass: The Narrative

Week 3: Douglass: cont.

January

Week 1: Melville: Typee

Week 2: Melville, cont. *Seminar paper submission.*

Week 3: Evaluation. *Final test.*

 

Secondary readings: reading material will be provided in digital form on Omega.

Additional reading:

Bercovitch, Sacvan. The American Jeremiad, Madison: The U of Wisconsin P, 1978. (selection)

Pease, Donald. Visionary Compacts: American Renaissance Writings in Cultural Context, Madison: U of Wisconsin P, 1987. (selection)

Pease, Donald, ed. National Identities and Post-Americanist Narratives, Durham: Duke UP, 1994. (selection)

Rowe, John Carlos. At Emerson’s Tomb: The Politics of Classic American Literature.

New York: Columbia UP, 1997. (selection)

Warren, Joyce, ed. The (Other) American Traditions: Nineteenth-Century Women Writers. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers UP, 1993. (selection)

Contemporary American Novel

Course title: Contemporary American Novel
Instructor
: Prof. Stipe Grgas

ECTS credits: 6
Status:
elective

Semester: 3rd and 5th or 4th and 6th
Enrollment requirements:
enrollment in the 3rd and 5th or 4th and 6th semester
Course description:
The course explores a number of novels which have been published since 9/11. The argument for targeting this body of texts derives from the notion that the contemporary or the “now” of the United States dates from this event. The course attempts to describe the form of the novel in contemporary US writing, the manner in which it reflects the present moment in US history and the way it engages the challenges of present reality.

Objectives: The purpose of the course is to develop the student’s ability to approach literary texts and to broaden their perspectives on the complexity of US reality.
Course requirements: continual attendance, oral presentation, written assignment, written final exam

Week by week schedule: the event, the present, 9/11 and its representations, American myths and their literary representations, the new regionalism, the city and capital, the sense of the ending

Reading List:
Thomas Pynchon, Inherent Vice
Steve Erickson, Shadowbahn
Cormac McCarthy, No Country for Old Men
Don Delillo, Cosmopolis
Don DeLillo, „Hammer and Sickle“
Annie Proulx, „Tits Up in a Ditch“
Paul Beatty, The Sellout
Cormac McCarthy, The Road

 

Aspects of American Romanticism (2016/17)

Dr Jelena Šesnić
Literary Seminar (2nd/3rd year): Aspects of American Romanticism (A, 19th c.)
Fall 2016/2017
ECTS credits: 6
Language: English
Status: elective
Duration:   3rd or 5th semester
Mon, 8:45-9:30 (A-105)
Wed, 10:15-11:45 (A-105)
Office: B-018
Phone: 4092060
E-mail: jsesnic@ffzg.hr
Office hours: Mon, 12:30-13:30; Thur 11-12

Course description: The period spans the decades from the 1820s to approximately the 1860s marked by the flowering of national literature in post-revolutionary times; the adoption and americanization of European ideas in so-called New England Transcendentalism, and the emergence of alternative (women, African Americans, commoners) voices. Alternatively called the American Renaissance, the period testifies to the coming-of-age of American literature. The texts are a representative selection of the unprecedented surge of creative energy that left no aspect of social and personal life untouched (from religion, education, women’s rights to politics and abolition), and will thus guide is in our examination of the past to which the American present owes so much.

Requirements: regular attendance; participation in class discussions; in-class and home assignments; seminar paper 6-7 pp. (ca 2000 words); mid-term + final test (continuous assessment, mandatory)

Selected works:
R.W. Emerson: selection of essays
Walt Whitman: Leaves of Grass (selection)
Henry David Thoreau: Walden (selection)
Margaret Fuller: Woman in the Nineteenth Century
Catharine Maria Sedgwick: Hope Leslie (novel)
Frederick Douglass: Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave
Herman Melville: Typee (novel)

Readings (alterations possible)

October 2016
Week 1: Introduction: key concepts; lit-historical context
Emerson: selected essays („The American Scholar“, „Self-Reliance“)
Week 2: Emerson: „The Poet“; Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass (selection)
Week 3: Thoreau: Walden (selected chapters)
Week 4: Thoreau: Walden (selected chapters)

November 2016
Week 1: Thoreau: „Civil Disobedience“, „A Plea for Captain John Brown“.
Week 2: Fuller: „Autobiographical romance“, „Self-definitions“ (excerpts)
Fuller: Woman in the Nineteenth-Century
Week 3: Fuller: Woman (cont.)
Week 4: Sedgwick: Hope Leslie (intro). *Mid-term.*

December 2016
Week 1: Sedgwick: cont.
Week 2: Sedgwick: cont.
Week 3: Douglass: The Narrative
Week 4: Douglass: cont.

January 2017
Week 1: Melville: Typee (intro)
Week 2: Melville, cont. *Seminar paper submission.*
Week 3: Melville, cont. *Evaluation. Final test.*

Secondary readings: additional reading material will be provided in digital form on Omega.
Additional reading:
Bercovitch, Sacvan. The American Jeremiad, Madison: The U of Wisconsin P, 1978. (selection)
Pease, Donald. Visionary Compacts: American Renaissance Writings in Cultural Context, Madison: U of Wisconsin P, 1987. (selection)
Pease, Donald, ed. National Identities and Post-Americanist Narratives, Durham: Duke UP, 1994. (selection)
Rowe, John Carlos. At Emerson’s Tomb: The Politics of Classic American Literature.
New York: Columbia UP, 1997. (selection)
Warren, Joyce, ed. The (Other) American Traditions: Nineteenth-Century Women Writers. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers UP, 1993. (selection)

 

Victorian novel. Poetics and Politics

Course title: The Victorian Novel. Poetics and Politics
(Former title of the course: Victorian novel – poetics and cultural politics)
Instructor: Professor Tatjana Jukić
ECTS  credits: 6
Language: English
Semester: 3 or 5
Enrollment requirements: Introduction to the Study of English Literature 1 and 2

Course description: The course attempts to describe and analyze the poetics and the politics of the Victorian novel. It explores how the novel engages and reciprocates the complexity of the Victorian natural sciences, the Victorian visual arts and the Victorian social and political theory. We will focus on the selected novels by Charlotte Brontë, Charles Dickens and George Eliot. Students are encouraged to read at least one extra novel, by Anthony Trollope and/or Thomas Hardy.

Course requirements: The grade is based on a written essay at the end of term (30% of the final grade), and two tests (30% of the final grade each), as well as on active participation in the class (10% of the final grade).

WEEK 1 Victorian culture and the Victorian novel.
WEEK 2 The Victorian novel and the natural sciences. Lyell and Darwin.
WEEK 3 The social and political prerogatives of the Victorian novel (1). Victorian women writers.
WEEK 4 The social and political prerogatives of the Victorian novel (2). Bentham and utilitarianism.
WEEK 5 The Victorian novel and the visual arts (1). Panopticism. Narration and focalization.
WEEK 6 The Victorian novel and the visual arts (2). The Pre-Raphaelites.
WEEK 7 Midterm.
WEEK 8 Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre (1).
WEEK 9 Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre (2).
WEEK 10 Charles Dickens, Great Expectations (1).
WEEK 11 Charles Dickens, Great Expectations (2).
WEEK 12 George Eliot, Felix Holt, the Radical (1).
WEEK 13 George Eliot, Felix Holt, the Radical (2).
WEEK 14 Final discussion.
WEEK 15 Final test. Evaluation.

Required reading:
Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, 1847.
Charles Dickens, Great Expectations, 1861.
George Eliot, Felix Holt, the Radical, 1866.

Optional reading:
George Eliot, Middlemarch, 1871.
John Fowles, The French Lieutenant’s Woman, 1969.
Thomas Hardy, Far from the Madding Crowd, 1874.
Antohony Trollope, Doctor Thorne, 1858.
Nancy Armstrong, Fiction in the Age of Photography: The Legacy of British Realism. Cambridge (Mass.): Harvard UP. 2000. 75-124.
Gillian Beer, Darwin’s Plots: Evolutionary Narrative in Darwin, George Eliot and Nineteenth-Century Fiction. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul. 1983. 236-258.
Peter Brooks, Reading for the Plot. Design and Intention in Narrative. Cambridge (Mass.): Harvard UP. 1992. 113-142.
Tatjana Jukić, Zazor, Nadzor, sviđanje. Dodiri književnog i vizualnog u britanskom 19. stoljeću. Zagreb: Zavod za znanost o književnosti Filozofskog fakulteta u Zagrebu. 2002. 157-208, 291-320.
J. Hillis Miller, Victorian Subjects. New York: Harvester Wheatsheaf. 229-235, 289-302.
Griselda Pollock, Vision and Difference. Femininity, Feminism and the Histories of Art. New York i London: Routledge. 1988. 91-114.
Elaine Showalter, A Literature of Their Own: British Women Novelists from Brontë to Lessing. Princeton: Princeton UP. 1977. 37-72.
Herbert F. Tucker (ed.). Victorian Literature and Culture. Oxford: Blackwell. 1999. 307-404.425-437.

 

Aspects of American Romanticism (2015/16)

Course Title: Aspects of American Romanticism (A, 19. st.)
Instructor: Dr  Jelena Šesnić
ECTS credits: 6
Language: English
Status: elective
Duration:   3rd or 5th semester

Fall 2015/2016
Mon, 8:45-9:30 (A-105)
Wed, 9:30-11 (A-105)
______________________________________________________________________________________

Course description: The period spans the decades from the 1820s to approximately the 1860s marked by the flowering of national literature in post-revolutionary times; the adoption and americanization of European ideas in so-called New England Transcendentalism, and the emergence of alternative (women, African Americans, commoners) voices. Alternatively called the American Renaissance, the period testifies to the coming-of-age of American literature. The texts are a representative selection of the unprecedented surge of creative energy that left no aspect of social and personal life untouched (from religion, education, women’s rights to politics and abolition), and will thus guide is in our examination of the past to which the American present owes so much.

Requirements: regular attendance; participation in class discussions; in-class and home assignments; seminar paper 6-7 pp. (ca 2000 words); mid-term + final test (continuous assessment, mandatory, non-negotiable)

Selected works:

R.W. Emerson: selection of essays

Walt Whitman: Leaves of Grass (selection)

Henry David Thoreau: Walden (selection); selection of essays

Margaret Fuller: Woman in the Nineteenth Century; selection of essays

Catharine Maria Sedgwick: Hope Leslie (novel)

Frederick Douglass: Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave

Herman Melville: Typee (novel)

 

Weekly Readings (alterations possible)

 

October 2015

Week 1: Introduction: key concepts; lit-historical context

Emerson: selected essays („The American Scholar“, „Self-Reliance“)

Week 2: Emerson: „The Poet“; Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass (selection)

Week 3: Thoreau: Walden (selected chapters)

Week 4: Thoreau: Walden, cont.

 

November 2015

Week 1: Thoreau: „Civil Disobedience“, „A Plea for Captain John Brown“

Week 2: Fuller: „Autobiographical romance“, „Self-definitions“ (excerpts)

Fuller: Woman in the Nineteenth-Century

Week 3: Fuller: Woman (cont.)

Week 4: Sedgwick: Hope Leslie (intro) *Mid-term.

December 2015

Week 1: Sedgwick: cont

Week 2: Sedwwick: cont.

Week 3: Douglass: The Narrative

Week 4: Douglass: cont.

 

January 2016

Week 1: Melville: Typee (intro)

Week 2: Melville, cont. *Seminar paper submission.

Week 3: Melville, cont. Evaluation. *Final test.

 

Secondary readings:

  • Additional reading material will be provided in digital form on Omega.

 

Bercovitch, Sacvan. The American Jeremiad, Madison: The U of Wisconsin P, 1978. (selection)

Pease, Donald. Visionary Compacts: American Renaissance Writings in Cultural Context, Madison: U of Wisconsin P, 1987. (selection)

Pease, Donald, ed. National Identities and Post-Americanist Narratives, Durham: Duke UP, 1994. (selection)

Rowe, John Carlos. At Emerson’s Tomb: The Politics of Classic American Literature.

New York: Columbia UP, 1997. (selection)

Warren, Joyce, ed. The (Other) American Traditions: Nineteenth-Century Women Writers. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers UP, 1993. (selection)

 

 

 

American postmodernism and popular culture

Course title: American Postmodernism and Popular Culture
Instructor: Asst. Prof. Sven Cvek, Hrvoje Tutek
ECTS credits: 6
Status: elective
Semester: 2nd or 3rd year of undergraduate studies
Enrollment requirements: student must be registered in the 3rd semester
Course description: This course centers on some crucial aspects of US postmodernism, such as a transforming relationship between “popular” and “high” culture, inquiries into the exchanges between historiography and fiction, and questions of availability of critical positions in the “late-capitalist” society. The course will focus on selected US postmodern novels, their interpretations, and their interactions with various forms of popular culture (textual, visual, musical), commonly understood either as sites of authentic expression of “the people,” or as fundamentally inauthentic products of an alienating culture industry. The discussion will include issues of: the distinction between mass and popular culture, consumerism, culture industry and cultural amnesia, simulacra, culture as a question of identity, globalization and Americanization, utopia.
Objectives: students will learn about the important cultural, social and political aspects of American postmodernism and their relation to the literary production of the period. The course also aims at preparing the students for a critical, contextually and theoretically informed reading of the novels, with a special emphasis on approaches informed by cultural studies.
Course requirements: regular attendance, written test, essay paper.

Week by week schedule: TBA

Reading: four or five of the following titles:
Ishmael Reed, Mumbo Jumbo
Willam Gibson, Neuromancer
Don DeLillo, White Noise
Art Spiegelman, Maus
Douglas Coupland, Generation X
Sherman Alexie, Reservation Blues
Octavia Butler, Parable of the Sower
Colson Whitehead, Zone One
Thomas Pynchon, Vineland
Hunter S. Thompson, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas
Ursula LeGuin, The Dispossessed
George Saunders, In Persuasion Nation

Students will also be required to read the course reader (about 200 pages) that provides the historical context and theoretical background for the course.


Irish culture

Dr. Aidan O’Malley, visiting lecturer
Subject: Modern literature
Course title: Irish culture
ECTS credits: 6
Language: English
Duration: 1 semester
Status: elective
Course type: lectures, seminars
Prerequisites: enrolment in 3rd / 5th semester
Course requirements:

  • 10-15 minute oral presentation
  • Mid-term exam (you are not permitted to answer a question on the text you presented)
  • Final exam (you are not permitted to answer a question on the text you presented)
  • 1,500-2,000 word essay based on your presentation. Plagiarism will result in a fail grade.
  • Attendance and participation in class

Course description: This course provides an overview of Irish history, politics, literature and culture more generally, with the focus on the period from the late-nineteenth century to the present. Particular attention is paid to the intersections of political and cultural impulses that led to the creation of the two states in the twentieth century—the Republic and Northern Ireland—and to understanding how both subsequently operated as states. To do this, the course explores how ideas of what constituted Irish identity have been proposed, have come to assume hegemonic force, have been debated and resisted through political and cultural activities, as well as through modes of historical interpretation.
Objective: The course intends to further students’ skills in understanding how literary and other cultural texts interact with political and historical events. To this end, students will be introduced to some of the major texts in twentieth-century Irish literature and history. They will also be introduced to some of the major debates in Irish Studies such as postcolonialism, revisionism and nationalism.

Syllabus:

Session 1: Outlining the course and organisation of presentations
Session 2: Locating Ireland

Overview of Irish history and culture up to the 19th century
Session 3: Colonialism and Nationalism
Lecture: 19th-century Irish nationalism

Seminar: The Famine; Celticism; Cultural nationalism
Session 4: The Literary Revival
Lecture: The Revival and the founding of the Abbey Theatre

Seminar: W.B. Yeats, Cathleen Ni Houlihan; On Baile’s Strand
Session 5: The Myth of the West
Lecture: The role of the west in the Irish imagination

Seminar: J.M. Synge, The Playboy of the Western World; John Ford, dir., The Quiet Man
Session 6: Joyce
Lecture: Introduction to Joyce
Seminar: ‘The Dead’, from Dubliners
Session 7: The Founding of the Free State
Lecture: 1916; The War of Independence; The Civil War
Seminar: Neil Jordan, dir., Michael Collins
Session 8: The Creation of Northern Ireland
Lecture: Unionism; World War II; The founding of Northern Ireland

Seminar: Frank McGuinness, Observe the Sons of Ulster Marching towards the Somme
Session 9: Mid-Term Exam
Session 10: Being Irish in English
Lecture: The creation of an Irish identity in English

Seminar: Brian Friel, Translations
Session 11: The Northern Irish ‘Troubles’
Lecture: The history of the ‘Troubles’

Seminar: Paul Greengrass, dir., Bloody Sunday
Session 12: The Artistic Response to the ‘Troubles’
Lecture: The Northern Irish literary ‘renaissance’

Seminar: Seamus Heaney, selected poems; Anne Devlin, Ourselves Alone; Steve McQueen, dir., Hunger
Session 13: Gender in Ireland
Lecture: Women and gender in the Republic and Northern Ireland
Seminar: Eavan Boland, ‘Outside History’; Marina Carr, The Mai
Session 14: Sport in Ireland
Lecture: Varieties of sports in Ireland and their relationships with political and cultural movements; the GAA
Seminar: Football (soccer); Rugby; Horse racing
Session 15: Irish Music and Contemporary Ireland
Lecture: From Carolan to boy bands
Seminar: Traditional music; popular music; Lisa Barros D’Sa and Glenn Leyburn, dirs., Good Vibrations (2013)

Presentations

Session 4: Use of Irish myth in W.B. Yeats, On Baile’s Strand
W.B. Yeats, Cathleen Ni Houlihan and cultural nationalism
Session 5: Fathers and sons in J.M. Synge, The Playboy of the Western World:

Gender relations and stereotypes in John Ford, dir., The Quiet Man:
Session 6: The dead in Joyce, ‘The Dead’
Session 7: Heroes and anti-heroes in Neil Jordan, dir., Michael Collins
Session 8: Masculinities in Frank McGuinness, Observe the Sons of Ulster Marching
towards the Somme
Session 10: The depiction of language change in Brian Friel, Translations
Session 11: Concepts of justice in Paul Greengrass, dir., Bloody Sunday
Session 12: Senses of roots in Seamus Heaney, selected poems (‘Digging’; ‘Mid-Term

Break’; ‘Personal Helicon’; ‘Requiem for the Croppies’; ‘Toome’; ‘Broagh’;
‘The Tollund Man’)
Steve McQueen, dir., Hunger: the body as the site of politics
The depiction of the roles of women in the ‘Troubles’ in Anne Devlin,
Ourselves Alone
Session 13: Women in Ireland in the 20th century

Women, Ireland and Literature in Eavan Boland, ‘Outside History’
(De)generations in Marina Carr, The Mai
Session 14: Football (soccer); Rugby; Horse racing. Focus on the historical

developments of these sports, their political and social statuses and
how these may have changed, where they have featured in literary
and popular culture.
Session 15: The history of traditional music

Popular music since the 1960s in Ireland
Punk and the ‘Troubles’ in Good Vibrations

Required reading:
W.B. Yeats, On Baile’s Strand
J.M. Synge, The Playboy of the Western World
Sean O’Casey, Juno and the Paycock
Frank McGuinness, Observe the Sons of Ulster Marching towards the Somme
John McGahern, Amongst Women
Other texts listed in the syllabus will be available for photocopying as a Reader.

Optional references:
The Field Day Anthology of Irish Writing, vols. I-V, (Derry and Cork: Field Day and Cork University Press, 1991 and 2002)
Irish University Review, vol. 33, no. 1, (2003), ‘New Perspectives on the Irish Literary Revival’
Irish University Review, 35: 1 Spring/Summer 2005, (Special John McGahern issue)
The Canadian Journal of Irish Studies, 17:1, July 1991, (Special John McGahern issue)
The Irish Review, 4, Spring 1988, (Nationalism and Revisionism Symposium)
Jonathan Bardon, A History of Ulster: New Updated Edition, (Belfast: The Blackstaff Press, 2001)
George D. Boyce, Nationalism in Ireland, 3rd ed., (London and New York: Routledge, 1995)
Brendan Bradshaw, ‘Nationalism and Historical Scholarship in Modern Ireland’, Irish Historical Studies, XXVI: 104, November 1989, pp. 329-351
Ciaran Brady, (ed.), Interpreting Irish History: The Debate on Historical Revisionism, 1938-1994, (Dublin: Irish Academic Press, 1994)
Malcolm Brown, The Politics of Irish Literature: from Thomas Davis to W.B. Yeats, (London: George Allen & Unwin, 1972)
Terence Brown, (ed.), Celticism, (Amsterdam: Rodopi, 1996)
Terence Brown, Ireland: A Social and Cultural History 1922-1985, (London: Fontana, 1985)
Steve Bruce, God Save Ulster: The Religion and Politics of Paisleyism, (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1986)
David Cairns and Shaun Richards, Writing Ireland: Colonialism, Nationalism and Culture, (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1988)
Clare Carroll and Patricia King, (eds.), Ireland and Post-Colonial Theory, (Cork: Cork University Press, 2002)
Joe Cleary and Claire Connolly, (eds.) The Cambridge Companion to Modern Irish Culture, (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005)
Terry Eagleton, Fredric Jameson, and Edward W. Said, Nationalism, Colonialism, and Literature (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1990)
Roy Foster, The Irish Story: Telling Tales and Making It Up in Ireland, (London and New York: Allen Lane, The Penguin Press, 2001)
Roy Foster, Modern Ireland, 1600-1972, (London: Penguin, 1988)
Roy Foster, ‘The Problems of Writing Irish History’, History Today, 34: 1, January 1984, pp. 27-30.
Roy Foster, ‘‘We Are All Revisionists Now’’, The Irish Review, 1, 1986, pp. 1-5.
Ernest Gellner, Nations and Nationalism, (Oxford: Blackwell, 1983)
Ernest Gellner, Culture, Identity, and Politics, (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1987)
Nicholas Grene, The Politics of Irish Drama: Plays in Context from Boucicault to Friel, (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999)
Stephen Howe, Ireland and Empire: Colonial Legacies in Irish History and Culture, (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000)
Declan Kiberd, Inventing Ireland: The Literature of the Modern Nation (London: Vintage, 1996)
Joseph J. Lee, Ireland 1912-1985, Politics and Society, (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989)
Ben Levitas, The Theatre of Nation: Irish Drama and Nationalism, 1890-1916, (Oxford University Press, 2002)
David Lloyd, Ireland After History, (Cork: Cork University Press, 1999)
F. S. L. Lyons, Culture and Anarchy in Ireland, 1890-1939, (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1979)
Eamonn McCann, War and an Irish Town, 3rd ed., (London and Boulder, Colorado: Pluto Press, 1993)
Conor McCarthy, Modernisation, Crisis and Culture in Ireland, 1969-1992, (Dublin and Portland, OR: Four Courts Press, 2000)
W. J. McCormack, (ed.), The Blackwell Companion to Modern Irish Culture, (Oxford: Blackwell, 1999)
John McGahern, Memoir, (London: Faber, 2006)
Christopher Murray, Twentieth-Century Irish Drama: A Mirror up to Nation, (Manchester and New York: Manchester University Press, 1997)
Lionel Pilkington, Theatre and the State in Twentieth-Century Ireland: Cultivating the People, (London and New York: Routledge, 2001)
Anthony Roche, Contemporary Irish Drama: From Beckett to McGuinness, (Dublin: Gill and Macmillan, 1994)
William Irwin Thompson, The Imagination of an Insurrection: Dublin, Easter 1916, A Study of an Ideological Movement, (New York and London: Harper and Row, 1972)

American Women’s Writing in the Nineteenth Century (archive)

Course title: American Women’s Writing in the Nineteenth Century (A, 19. st.)
Subject: Nineteenth-Century American Literature
Instructor: Dr. sc. Jelena Šesnić
ECTS credits: 6
Language: English
Duration: Fall semester
Status: Elective
Course type: 1 period lecture + 2 periods seminar
Prerequisites: Enrolment in the 3rd or 5th semester
Course requirements: Regular attendance; assignments in and outside class (discussion, written tasks, short presentations); seminar paper (6-7 pp, ca 2500 words); continuous evaluation (a mid-term and a final test).

Course description: The course is an overview of representative texts by and about women in nineteenth-century America. In order better to contextualize the texts, we shall be looking at two traditions informing writing by women that are mutually compatible rather than exclusionary. The one is represented by Rowlandson’s captivity narrative and situates a woman at the centre of the project of nation-building, while the other is exemplified by Rowson’s hugely popular seduction novel, from which the novel writing in the States takes off. Thus the feminine tradition appears to be crucial from the very beginning for the way the American nation describes and represents itself. This argument, however, becomes possible only in the wake of the strong intervention into the field of literary history and literary canon formation enacted by feminist, poststructuralist, new historicist and cultural critics from the 1970s onwards.

Required reading:

Novels/ narratives

1. Mary Rowlandson: The Sovereignty and Goodness of God (1682)
2. Susanna Rowson: Charlotte Temple (1791)
3. Lydia Maria Child: Hobomok (1824)
4. Harriet Jacobs: Incidents in the Life of a Slave-Girl (1861)
5. Rebecca Harding Davis: Margret Howth (1861)
6. Frances Harper: Iola Leroy (1893)

Syllabus

Week 1: Two traditions of women’s writing in the USA; historical and cultural contexts of their emergence (Welter’s thesis, competing views). Revisionist interventions into the canon formation.

Week 2: Introduction to Rowlandson.Mary Rowlandson’s captivity narrative as a formative national text; Richard Slotkin’s notion of „regeneration through violence“

Week 3: Analysis of cultural, political, ethical, and gendered implications of Rowlandson’s captivity

Week 4: Susanna Rowson’s novel as a representative and generative instance of the seduction novel

Week 5: Rowson’s novel in the context of transatlantic cultural exchange and sentimentalism

Week 6: L.M. Child’s Hobomok and the idea of cultural nationalism

Week 7: Hobomok as a revisionst text; politics of race and gender in the novel (Indian and female characters)

Week 8: Mid-term. Introduction to Jacobs’s slave narrative depicting her life in slavery

Week 9: Jacobs’s text in between the domestic, sentimental and seduction novels and representative masculine slave narratives

Week 10: Analysis of narrative and cultural strategies in conjunction with race and gender in Jacobs’s text.

Week 11: Harding Davis’s Margret Howth as a novel of the industralizing America and of the emerging working class.

Week 12: Analysis of the novel’s accommodation of realism with the conventions of sentimentalism and women’s fiction.

Week 13: Harper’s Iola Leroy and the post-slavery, post-Reconstruction America. On-going influence of the domestic and sentimental fiction.

Week 14: Status and color distinction within the black community; Iola Leroy as a „tragic mulatta“ and the problem of passing.

Week 15: Final test. Student evaluation.

Secondary literature (required):

– Castiglia, Christopher. Bound and Determined: Captivity, Culture-Crossing, and White Womanhood from Mary Rowlandson to Patty Hearst. Chicago, London: The U of Chicago P, 1996. (selection)
– Foster, Frances S. Written by Herself: Literary Production by African American Women, 1746-1892. Bloomington, Indianapolis: Indiana UP, 1993. (selection)
– Goddu, Teresa. Gothic America: Narrative, History, and Nation. New York: Columbia UP, 1997. (selection)
– Grasso, Linda. The Artistry of Anger: Black and White Women’s Literature in America, 1820-1860. Chapel Hill, London: The U of North Carolina P, 2002. (selection)
– Howard, June. «What Is Sentimentality?» American Literary History 11.1 (Spring 1990): 63-81.
– Kaplan, Amy. «Manifest Domesticity». American Literature. No More Separate Spheres. 70.3 (September 1998): 581-606.
– Nelson, Dana. The Word in Black and White: Reading ‘Race’ in American Literature, 1638-1867. New York, Oxford: Oxford UP, 1994. (selection)
– Schloss, Dietmar. “Republicanism and Politeness in the Early American Novel”. Early America Re-Explored: Readings in Colonial, Early National, and Antebellum Culture. Eds. Fritz Fleischmann and Klaus H. Schmidt. New York: Peter Lang, 2000. 269-90.
– Slotkin, Richard. Regeneration through Violence: the Mythology of the American Frontier, 1600-1800, Norman: U of Oklahoma P, 1973. (selection)
– Welter, Barbara. „The Cult of True Womanhood: 1820-1860“. 1966. Locating American Studies: The Evolution of a Discipline. Ed. Lucy Maddox. Baltimore, London: The Johns Hopkins UP, 1999. 43-70.
– Yellin, Jean Fagan. „The ‘Feminization’ of Rebecca Harding Davis“. American Literary History 2.2 (Summer 1990): 203-19.

Optional reading:

– American Literature. No More Separate Spheres. 70.3 (Sept. 1998).
– Armstrong, Nancy and Leonard Tennenhouse. „The Problem of Population and the Form of the American Novel“. American Literary History 20.4 (Winter 2008): 667-85.
– Baym, Nina. «Women’s Novels and Women’s Minds: An Unsentimental View of Nineteenth-Century American Women’s Fiction». Novel: A Forum on Fiction 31.3 (Summer 1998): 335-50.
– Carby, Hazel. Reconstructing Womanhood : The Emergence of the Afro-American Woman Novelist. New York, Oxford: Oxford UP, 1989.
– Davidson, Cathy. Revolution and the Word: The Rise of the Novel in America. New York, Oxford: Oxford UP, 1986. (selection)
– Douglas, Ann. The Feminization of American Culture. 1977. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1998.
– Elbert, Monika, ed. Separate Spheres No More: Gender Convergence in American Literature, 1830-1930. Tuscaloosa, London: The U of Alabama P, 2000.
– Foster, Frances S. Written by Herself: Literary Production by African American Women, 1746-1892. Bloomington, Indianapolis: Indiana UP, 1993.
– Hendler, Glenn. Public Sentiments: Structures of Feeling in Nineteenth-Century American Literature. Chapel Hill, London: The U of North Carolina P, 2001.
– Karcher, Carolyn. «Reconceiving Nineteenth-Century American Literature: The Challenge of Women Writers». American Literature 66.4 (Dec. 1994): 781-93.
– Kelley, Mary. Private Women, Public Stage: Literary Domesticity in Nineteenth-Century America. New York, Oxford: Oxford UP, 1984.
– Kilcup, Karen, ed. Soft Canons: American Women Writers and Masculine Tradition. Iowa City: U of Iowa P, 1999.
– Maddock Dillon, Elizabeth. «Sentimental Aesthetics». American Literature 76.3 (September 2004): 495-523.
– Merish, Lori. Sentimental Materialism: Gender, Commodity Culture, and Nineteenth-Century American Literature. Durham, London: Duke UP, 2000.
– Moon, Michael and Cathy Davidson, eds. Subjects and Citizens: Nation, Race, and Gender from Oronooko to Anita Hill, Duke UP, Durham and London, 1995.
– Romero, Lora. Home Fronts: Domesticity and Its Critics in the Antebellum United States. Durham, London: Duke UP, 1997.
– Samuels, Shirley, ed. The Culture of Sentiment: Race, Gender, and Sentimentality in Nineteenth- Century America. New York, Oxford: Oxford UP, 1992.
– Showalter, Elaine. Sister’s Choice: Tradition and Change in American Women’s Writing. Oxford: Clarendon P, 1991.
– Šesnić, Jelena. Mračne žene. Prikazi ženstva u američkoj književnosti (1820.-1860.). Zagreb: Leykam International, 2010.
– Tate, Claudia. «Allegories of Black Female Desire; or, Rereading Nineteenth-Century Sentimental Narratives of Black Female Authority». Changing Our Own Words: Essays on Criticism, Theory, and Writings by Black Women. Ed. Cheryl Wall. New Brunswick, London: Rutgers UP, 1991. 98-126.
– Tawil, Ezra. „Domestic Frontier Romance, or, How the Sentimental Heroine Became White“. Novel: A Forum on Fiction 32.1 (Fall 1998): 99-124.
– Tompkins, Jane. Sensational Designs: The Cultural Work of American Fiction, 1790-1860. New York, Oxford: Oxford UP, 1985.
– Warren, Joyce, ed. The (Other) American Traditions: Nineteenth-Century Women Writers. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers UP, 1993.


 

Creating Place Out of Space: Early Australian Literature

Course title: Creating Place Out of Space: Early Australian Literature
Instructor: Dr. Tihana Klepač

ECTS credits: 6
Language: English
Status: elective
Enrolment requirements: enrolment in 3rd or 5th semester
Course requirements: continuous assessment; regular attendance, work in class, 1 written assignment, mid-term and end-term exam.
Course description: Selected texts exemplify the creation of place out of space on the Australian continent. The course traces the formulation of the Australian national Self from the first descriptions of landscape worlding (Spivak) Australia, introducing the country into cultural circulation, to the acceptance of geographical and historical particularities, coming to terms with inherited ways of representing the continent and the nation, to the emergence of national consciousness in late 19th century and the formulation of the nation through novels which are postulated as the culmination of the national impulse. The course thus outlines the process whereby an unknown and distant land becomes a home.
Objectives: The objective of the course is to awaken the students’ awareness of the ways in which narrations formulate the national self by exploring the example of early Australian literature.
Course requirements: The final grade is based on continuous assessment which includes regular attendance, preparation for and participation in class, writing small assignments, timely submission of the final paper, and obligatory sitting for midterm and endterm exam. Students must meet all requirements of continuous assessment.

Week by week schedule:
WEEK 1
Introduction to the history and culture of Australia

WEEK 2
Representing a New World: 1789 – 1850;
Australia as a Land of Oddities

WEEK 3
Worlding of the continent (Spivak); James Cook’s diaries, travel writing by Australian inland explorers: Edward Eyre, Charles Sturt (excerpts)

WEEK 4
The Colonial Period 1850 – 1890; British penal system; Governor Phillips’s diary; films: Discovery: Short History of the World – Convict Australia, Timewatch: The Floating Brothel
WEEK 5
Narratives of crime and punishment, influence of environment on the character; the formulation of national characteristics; Marcus Clarke: For the Term of His Natural Life, Rolf Boldrewood: Robbery Under Arms (excerpts)

WEEK 6
«Damned Whore» vs. «God’s Police» – representation of women in Australian; film Timewatch: The Floating Brothel
WEEK 7
Literature by women: interventions in the romance, as the genre available to women writers, to discuss the position of women, marriage and often the very conventions of the genre; Ada Cambridge: A Marked Man (excerpts)

WEEK 8
Imitating Victorian models: sonnets, love poems; abandoning the Victorian model, description of bushrangers in blank verse; early formulation of national symbols: the spell of the bush, the bush grave; poetry: Harpur, Kendall, Gordon, Ada Cambridge (selected poems)

Mid-term exam
WEEK 9
The Nationalist Period 1890 – 1922; development of cities: Sydney, Melbourne; the role of The Bulletin, Angus & Robertson and the Heidelberg school of painting

WEEK 10
Abandoning the conventions of romance and melodrama, readers are no longer British consumers of exotic stories about the colonies. Representation of Australia “from within”; ideas about Australian landscape and the national character; ballad: Paterson: “The Man from Snowy River”; excerpt from the film The Man from Snowy River, 1982, director: George Miller

WEEK 11
Short story: Henry Lawson, Barbara Baynton (selected stories)

WEEK 12 – 13
Novel as a form of nation building – Novels of the Federation; Miles Franklin: My Brilliant Career; film: My Brilliant Career, 1979, director: Gillian Anderson; Joseph Furphy: Such is Life (excerpts)

WEEK 14
End-term exam.

Reading:
Due to unavailability of reference material, all relevant texts are contained in Early Australian Literature Reader and contains texts from the following editions:

– Paul Carter, The Road to Botany Bay, Alfred A. Knopf, New York, 1988
– Robert Hughes, The Fatal Shore, Vintage, New York, 1988
– Elizabeth Webby, “Introduction” and “Colonial writers and readers,” The Cambridge Companion to Australian Literature, Elizabeth Webby (ed.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000, pp. 1-18 and 50-74
– Kerryn Goldsworthy, “Fiction from 1900-1970,” The Cambridge Companion to Australian Literature, Elizabeth Webby (ed.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000, pp. 105-109
– Anne Summers, Damned Whores and God’s Police, The Colonization of Women in Australia, Penguin, London, 1981
– Susan Sheridan, Along the Faultlines – Sex, Race and Nation in Australian Women’s Writing, Allen & Unwin, St. Leonards, 1995
– Leigh Astbury, City Bushmen, The Heidelberg School and the Rural Mythology, Oxford UP, Melbourne, 1985

 

British Romanticism: poetry (archive)

Course title: British Romanticism: poetry
(Former course title: English Romantic Poetry
)
Instructor:
Martina Domines Veliki, PhD
ECTS credits: 6
Language: English
Duration: 3rd or 5th, semester
Status: elective
Course type: 1 hour of lecture, 2 hours of seminar
Prerequisites: Introduction to English Literature or Introduction into English Lit 1 and 2
Course description: Authors we will read include Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley and Keats. Through reading of their representative poetry we will tackle some fundamental Romantic concepts such as poetic inspiration, memory of the past events, the sublime, deism and mysticism, the relationship between the poetic subject and nature as well as the role played by language. The poetic subject becomes the central topic of most Romantic poetry and it is actualized through a close relationship with nature that acts as either a consoling or a debilitating force. Priority will be given to the Romantic poets of the first generation. These poets often imagine themselves to be responding to the French Revolution. They rebel against social injustice, cherishing feelings for ‘common’ people. Their innovations at the level of subject matter but also of literary form were far-reaching to the point that we could speak about them as being the first ‘modern’ writers.
Objective: The students will be introduced to the major poets of English Romanticism, as well as their relevant historical, cultural, political and aesthetic milieu. The aim of this course is to encourage students to create their own view of the suggested array of poems through close reading. They will be asked to think about and analyze these poems with the help of a number of critical texts (from more traditional to post-structuralist ones).
Course requirements: continuous assessment (midterm and final exam, final paper, class attendance and participation).

Weekly schedule::
1. week. Introduction to English Romanticism. Periodization. Formative experiences for Romantic poetry
2. week. William Blake. Selections from Songs of Innocence and Experience
3. week. Blake continued – The Marriage of Heaven and Hell
4. week. William Wordsworth, excerpts from the 1800 Preface to Lyrical Ballads, a selection of poems from Lyrical Ballads
5. week. Wordsworth continued – a selection of poems from Poems in two Volumes
6. week. Wordsworth continued – The Prelude (chosen books)
7. week. Samuel Taylor Coleridge – selections from Biographia Literaria
8. week. Coleridge continued – The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, Dejection: an Ode
9. week. Mid-term exam
10. week. George Gordon Byron – excerpts from Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage
11. week. Byron continued – Prometheus, Fare Thee Well
12. week. Percy Bysshe Shelley – Ozymandias, Ode to the West Wind
13. week. Shelley continued – To a Skylark, excerpts from A Defence of Poetry, Preface to Prometheus Unbound
14. week. John Keats – To Autumn, La Belle Dame Sans merci, Ode on a Grecian Urn
15. week. End-term exam

Reading list:
Primary literature:
– Bloom, Harold & Trilling, Lionel: Romantic Poetry and Prose (New York, London, Toronto : Oxford University Press , 1973) ili Wu, Duncan: A Companion to Romanticism (Oxford: Blackwell, 2001)
– Abrams, M. H.: The Mirror and the Lamp: Romantic Theory and the Critical Tradition (London: Oxford University Press, 1960)
– Bloom, Harold: The Visionary Company: A Reading of English Romantic Poetry  (London: Cornell University Press, any edition)
– Curran, Stuart (ed.): The Cambridge Companion to British Romanticism (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998)
– Daiches, David: A Critical History of English Literature in four volumes (relevant  chapters) (London : Secker & Warburg , 1992)

Secondary literature::
– Abrams, M. H.: Natural Supernaturalism: Tradition and Revolution in Romantic  Literature (London: Oxford University Press, 1971)
– Bennett, Andrew: Romantic Poets and the Culture of Posterity (Cambridge UP, 1999)
– Brisman, Leslie: Romantic Origins (Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 1978)
– Bromwich, David: Disowned by Memory: Wordsworth’s Poetry of the 1790s (Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press, 2000)
– Butler, Marilyn: Romantics, Rebels and Reactionaries – English Literature and its  Background 1760-1830 (Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press, 1981)
– Day, Aidan: Romanticism (London and New York: Routledge, 1996)
– de Man, Paul: The Rhetoric of Romanticism (New York: Columbia University Press, 1984)
– Erdman, David: Blake : Prophet against Empire (New York : Dover, 1991)
– Gill, Stephen: The Cambridge Companion to Wordsworth (Cambridge UP, 2003)
– Hartman, Geoffrey: Wordsworth’s Poetry 1787-1813 (Harvard UP, 1987)
– Mellor, Anne K.: Romanticism and Gender (Routledge, 1993)
– Roe, Nicholas. Wordsworth and Coleridge: The Radical Years (Oxford: Clarendon  Press, 2003)
– Reed, Arden: Romanticism and Language (Cornell University Press, 1984)
– Bone, Drummond: The Cambridge Companion to Byron (Cambridge UP, 2004)
– Morton, Timothy: The Cambridge Companion to Shelley (Cambridge UP, 2006)
– Newlyn, Lucy: The Cambridge Companion to Coleridge (Cambridge UP, 2002)
– Wolfson, Susan: The Cambridge Companion to Keats (Cambridge UP, 2001)

 

 

American literature and culture 1: The Old South

Course title: American literature and culture 1: The Old South
Instructor:
Prof. Douglas Ambrose (Fulbright Scholar)

ECTS credits: 6
Language: English
Status: Elective
Semester: 3th or 5th
Enrolment requirements: completed Introduction to English Literature
_________________________________________________________________________________________

 

COURSE GOALS:
Tell about the South. What’s it like there. What do they do there. Why do they live there. Why do they live at all.
                                                                                        William Faulkner, Absalom, Absalom!

COURSE DISCRIPTION:
In this course we will “tell about the South.”  We will focus on the development and consolidation of the slave society and culture of the Old South and its relation to northern society and culture.  Through selected readings, lectures, and discussions, we will explore how the South developed a distinctive social order that found itself by the 1850s locked in a life and death struggle with the North.  What were the historical origins of this powerful, complex, and changing regional society?  What role did slavery play in southern social, cultural, economic, and political life?  How did a society of different and often antagonistic races and classes maintain stability and order down to the War for Southern Independence?  How did Africans and African Americans accommodate to and resist their enslavement?  How did white and black southerners perceive and relate to each other?  What characterized elite and non-elite white culture?  How did southern literary expression—novels, poetry, scholarship, religious literature—both participate in a broad “American” culture and reflect a distinct “Southern” cultural movement?  By addressing these questions, and others, we will gain a better understanding of how this region and its people affected the course of American history and culture.
FORMAT:
Although primarily a lecture course, I encourage questions and comments at all times.  On certain occasions, we will conduct class entirely as a discussion-based seminar.  Students should always complete all readings for the week before the Wednesday meeting so that they can offer informed and thoughtful contributions to class discussions.
ASSIGNMENTS:
You will have two written assignments, each of approximately 1000-1250 words. There will also be a final examination.
EVALUATION:
I will evaluate your performance based on your attendance, participation, and performance on the papers and the exam.
REQUIRED READINGS:
Nearly all of the materials for the course will be either on the class’s Omega site or available online.  Students should obtain a hard copy of Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin.