Category Archives: 8. semestar – SMJER PREVODITELJSTVO

Localisation

Module title: Localisation
Module coordinator: Dr Kristijan Nikolić, senior lecturer
Instructor: Dr Kristijan Nikolić, senior lecturer
ECTS credits
: 5
Language of instruction: English
Semester: 2nd or 4th (summer)
Form of instruction: 1h lecture + 2 h seminar
Examination: final paper

Status: optional

Objectives: The purpose of this module is giving an insight into the nature of the localisation industry, the development of critical thinking about basic localisation concepts and processes, including quality and project management, as well as developing skills and knowledge key for the adaptation of a product to a certain locale.

Module contents:
Localisation involves linguistic and cultural adaptation of a product (for instance software, videogame and website) to a certain locale (country / region or language) in which it is going to be used and sold. Since an increasing number of users are digitally literate and since companies increasingly demand globalisation of their products that go over linguistic and cultural barriers, localisation industry is on the rise, which means that the need for translators who understand localisation is increasing. Knowhow and skills connected to localisation are gaining more importance, not only for students who wish to work in the localisation industry, but also for all students who plan to work as translators.

Topics:

  1. Translation and localisation.
  2. Website localisation.
  3. Project management as a part of localisation.
  4. Game localisation.
  5. Risk management and soft skills.
  6. Transcreation as a part of localisation.
  7. Translation challenges in localisation.
  8. Software localisation.
  9. Multimedia localisation.

Module requirements:
Attendance is obligatory. Students will be asked to come prepared to classes (which involves reading and analysing literature). Active participation in the classroom is mandatory and students must complete necessary tasks/homework. The final grade is based on continuous assessment of all segments of work (attendance, active participation in the classroom and via e-learning, and the seminar/project work).

Required reading:
Esselink, Bert. (2000) A Practical Guide to Localisation. Amsterdam / Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company.

Bernal-Merino, Miguel Á. (2015) Translation and Localisation in Video Games. Making Entertainment Software Global. New York/London: Routledge.

Dunne, Keiran J. and Elena S. Dunne. (2011) Translation and Localisation Project Management: the art of the possible. Amsterdam / Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company. (odabrana poglavlja).

Trosborg, A. (ed.) 1997. Text Typology and Translation. John Benjamins Publishing (odabrana poglavlja)

Suggested reading:

Matis, Nancy. (2014) How to Manage Your Translation Projects.

O’Hagan, Minako and Carme Manigron. (2013) Game Localisation: translating for the global digital entertainment industry. Amsterdam / Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company.

 

 

Post-editing and machine translation quality assessment

Syllabus
Course title:   Post-editing and machine translation quality assessment
Course coordinator:  Dr. Nataša Pavlović, Associate Professor
Instructor: Dr. Nataša Pavlović, Associate Professor
ECTS credits:  4
Language:   English and Croatian
Semester:   summer (2nd or 4th)
Status:  Elective
Form of instruction:  2 contact hours of seminar + e-learning
Examination:  written, continuous assessment

OBJECTIVES:
By the end of the course the students should be able to post-edit machine translation output and assess its quality. 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
The course deals with the following topics: the concept of translation quality; error classifications; post-editing vs. human translation revision; types of errors in MT output; levels of post-editing relative to translation purpose; post-editing guidelines; monolingual and bilingual post-editing; human and automatic MT quality assessment; pre-editing; integration of MT in CAT tools; MT and terminology; role of post-editing in professional translation practice; qualifications and competences required of post-editors; the impact of MT on translation theory and practice.

MODE OF INSTRUCTION:
The coursework consists in practical tasks related to post-editing and MT quality assessment, as well as discussion of particular topics (see Week-to-week schedule). The course involves e-learning via http://omega.ffzg.hr/.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND ASSESSMENT:
Regular attendance, preparedness for class, active participation in class and in e-learning, regular submission of assignments.

The final grade is based on continuous assessment of particular course elements (attendance, active participation in class and in e-learning, end-of-term paper).

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
After completing the course the students will be able to post-edit MT output of different types of texts in various fields in line with the guidelines and instructions; pre-edit the text for MT; assess the quality of MT output; critically assess the translation process in which MT has been used as an integral part; cooperate with other translators, terminologists and field experts; critically assess the impact of MT on translation theory and practice.

OBLIGATORY READING:
O’Brien, S. 2017. “Machine Translation and Cognition”. In: Schwieter, J.W. i Ferreira (ed.), A. Translation and Cognition. Hoboken: Wiley Blackwell

O’Brien, S. & Simard, M. (eds.) 2014. Machine Tranaslation Special Issue: Post-E

O’Brien, S. et al. (ed.) 2014. Post-Editing of Machine Translation: Processes and Applications. Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.

O’Brien, S., Simard, M. & Specia, L. 2013. Proceedings of MT Summit XIV Workshop on Post-Editing Technology and Practice. URL: http://www.mt-archive.info/10/MTS-2013-W2-TOC.htm

Rico, C. and Torrejón, E. 2012. “Skills and Profile or the New Role of the Translator as MT Post-Editor”. Revista Tradumática: technologies de la traducció 10:166–178.

TAUS i CNGL. 2010. “Machine Translation Post-editing Guidelines”. URL: https://taus.net/academy/best-practices/postedit-best-practices/machine-translation-post-editing-guidelines

ADDITIONAL READING:
Guerberof, A. 2009. “Productivity and Quality in the Post-editing of Outputs from Translation Memories and Machine Translation”. Localisation Focus 7(1):11-21.

ISO 18587:2017 “Translation services — Post-editing of Machine Translation Output – Requirements”.

Pym, A. 2013. “Translation Skill-Sets in a Machine-Translation Age”. Meta 58(3):487–503.

Temizöz, Ö. 2014. Postediting Machine Translation Output And Its Revision: Subject-Matter Expert Experts Versus Professional Translators. PhD thesis. Tarragona: Universitat Rovira i Virgili. URL: http://www.tdx.cat/bitstream/handle/10803/128204/TemizozOzlem_TDX2.pdf?sequence=1

WEEK-BY-WEEK SCHEDULE:
The course consists of 15 sessions (30 contact hours) over the course of one semester.

Session 1: introduction; presentation of the syllabus and course requirements; a brief overview of MT development and post-editing; discussion.

Session 2: the concept of quality in translation from various perspectives; error classifications; discussion and tasks.

Session 3: comparison of MT output produced by different systems; differences in quality and error types; differences related to text types and fields; student expectations and attitudes towards MT; discussion and tasks.

Sessions 4 and 5: comparison of machine and human translations; expected error types in each; differences related to text types and fields; discussion and tasks.

Session 6: post-editing guidelines; levels of post-editing; discussion and tasks.

Sessions 7 and 8: monolingual and bilingual post-editing; discussion and tasks.

Sessions 9 and 10: pre-editing and its impact on MT output; discussion and tasks.

Session 11 and 12: human and automatic MT quality assessment; discussion and tasks.

Session 13 and 14: post-editing in CAT tools; terminology management in translation processes involving MT; discussion and tasks.

Session 15: the role of post-editing in professional translation practice; competences and qualifications required of post-editors; student feedback on the course.

 

 

Translation and Power

Course title: Translation and Power
Course coordinator:
 Ellen Elias-Bursać
Instructor:
 Ellen Elias-Bursać

ECTS credits: 4
Language:
 English
Duration:
 1 semester (summer)
Status:
 elective
Form of instruction:
 two contact hours of seminar
Enrollment requirements:
 Students must be enrolled in the 2nd or higher semester of one of the following graduate study programs: English Language and Literature – Translation Track, Comparative Linguistics, Croatian Language and Literature, South Slavic Languages and Literatures.
Exam:
 final written exam
Course description: 
“Translation and Power” addresses the cultural and political asymmetries inherent in every act of translation and interpreting, the ways translators and interpreters choose to compensate for these asymmetries, and the impact of their choices. The readings will focus on post-colonial translation issues; the ethics of translation and interpreting; the experiences of working as an interpreter and translator in war.
Objectives: To identify and examine the power dynamic relevant to all translation and interpreting through the lens of post-colonial and wartime translation and interpreting; students will reflect on their own position within this power dynamic.
Course requirements: Regular course attendance, participation in classroom discussion, holding an interview with a translator or interpreter who worked during the war in Croatia (to be assigned by the instructor). Final written exam.

COURSE SCHEDULE

Session Topic
1, 2, 3 Post-Colonialism, Power, Translation
4, 5 The ethics of interpreting
6, 7, 8, 9 Wartime interpreting in Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina
10, 11 Translating and Interpreting at the ICTY
12, 13 NATO language services in Bosnia and Herzegovina

Required reading will be available at Omega (http://omega.ffzg.hr/).

Reading:

Mona Baker, ed. 2010. Critical Readings in Translation Studies. London: Routledge.

Maria Tymoczko & Edwin Gentzler, eds. 2002. Translation and Power.  Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press.

Claudia Angeleli & Ghada Osman. 2007.  “‘A Crime in Another Language?’ An Analysis of the Interpreter’s Role in the Yousry Case,” Translation and Interpreting Studies 2.1.

Catherine Baker. 2012. “Prosperity without Security: The Precarity of Interpreters in Postsocialist, Postconflict Bosnia-Herzegovina,” Slavic Review 71, no. 4.

Ellen Elias-Bursać. Translating Evidence and Interpreting Testimony at a War Crimes Tribunal: Working in a Tug-of-War. London: Palgrave Macmillan.

Ian Jones & Louise Askew. 2014. “Bosnia and Herzegovina”.  Meeting the Language Challenges of NATO Operations, Palgrave Macmillan.

Croatian Literature in Translation

Course title: Croatian Literature in Translation
Course coordinator:
  Dr. Ellen Elias-Bursać
Instructor:
 Dr. Ellen Elias-Bursać

ECTS credits: 4
Language:
 English and Croatian
Duration:
 1 semester (summer)
Status:
 elective
Form of instruction:
 two contact hours of seminar
Enrollment requirements:
  Students must be enrolled in the 2nd or higher semester of one of the following graduate study programs: English Language and Literature – Translation Track, Comparative Linguistics, Croatian Language and Literature, South Slavic Languages and Literatures.
Exam:
 final written exam
Course description: 
Students will analyze excerpts from Croatian literature in English translations dating from the 1920s to the present day, and in parallel, discuss recent readings in Translation Studies. Discussion will focus on the strategies employed by the translators, with attention to domestication, foreignization, cultural reference, glossing, the translator’s introduction, humor, and the challenges related to syntax, word choice and translation of names that face the translator, and how these strategies relate to those discussed in the Translation Studies readings.
Objectives:  By the end of the course the students will have read from a wide range of translations of Croatian literature and learned to identify the practical application of theoretical approaches described in Translation Studies.
Course requirements: Regular course attendance, participation in classroom discussion, an in-class seminar presentation on one of the translations under discussion. Final written exam.

COURSE SCHEDULE

Session Topic
1, 2, 3 Introduction. Translations of Petar Hektorović and Marin Držić. Strategies for academic translation, editing.
4, 5 Translations of August Šenoa and Vjenceslav Novak. Strategies of literal vs. free translation, foreignness in translation.
6, 7 Translations of Ivana Brlić Mažuranić and Miroslav Krleža. Stategies for translation of sentence and context.
8, 9 Translations of Antun Šoljan and Ivan Kušan. Strategies for publishing English translations of Croatian literature.
10, 11 Translations of Ivo Brešan and Dubravka Ugrešić.  Strategies for translating  humor and dialect. Glossing.
12, 13 Translations of Robert Perišić and Mima Simić. Strategies for gender and political translation.

Required reading will be available at Omega (http://omega.ffzg.hr/).

Reading:

Esther Allen and Susan Bernofsky, eds. 2013. In Translation. New York: Columbia University Press.

Additional readings:

L. Borges. 1999. “Pierre Menard, Author of Don Quixote.” Collected Fictions. Penguin. Tr. Andrew Hurley.

Ann Pasternak Slater. 5 November 2010. “Rereading Dr. Zhivago.” The Guardian.

Orlando Figes. 22 November 2007. “Tolstoy’s Real Hero.” New York Review of Books.

Tony Beckwith. July 2013. “Two Translators with a Swedish Tattoo.” The ATA Chronicle

Anthony Gardener. 2010. “The Champion of Translated Fiction.” Interviews. Web.

Martin Fackler. 2 November 2012. “Lifelong Scholar of Japanese Becomes One of Them.” NY Times.

Daniel Kehlmann. 25 February 2013. “In Praise of My Translator”. Publishing Perspectives. Web.

Robert Lowell. 1990. “Foreword.” Imitations. Farrar, Straus, and Giroux.

 

Sociolinguistics (P)

Course title: Sociolinguistics
Course coordinator: Dr. Anđel Starčević, Assistant Professor
Instructor: Dr. Anđel Starčević, Assistant Professor
ECTS credits
: 5

Language: English
Semester: II (summer)
Status: elective
Form of instruction: 2 lectures + 1 seminar per week
Examination: written

Syllabus
Week-by-week schedule
Week / Topic
1. Sociolinguistics as a branch of linguistics. The fiction of homogeneity versus language stratification and its varieties. Langue and parole (Saussure), competence and performance (Chomsky) versus communicative competence (Hymes). Speakers’s repertoire within speech community(Labov).
2. Regional (rural) and urban dialectology.Research methods. Horizontal and vertical view of language. Social class, age, gender and ethnicity as extra-lingistic constraints in the explanation of systematic language varieties versus free variants.
3. Language as a component of ethnicity. Substratum effect. Hypercorrection as a result of social pressure. African American Vernacular English and its origin. Is there a connection between race and language? Language attitudes. Matched-guise test results.
4. Language and gender. Grammatical and natural gender in languages (English, French, Croatian). Difference between male and female use of language. Language taboo for women . Women’s language use in ‘primitive’ societies. Accounting for differences between women’s and men’s language. Activities to change the present ‘biased’ usage.
5. Language varieties in context. Linguistic communities verbal repertoire. Registers. Style as a continuum and its social meaning.  Slang. Difficulties in elicitation of casual, informal speech.
6. Address reciprocal, non-reciprocal .Power and solidarity. Polite and familiar V/T in Croatian and English. Address in some Asian languages.
7. Diglossia and monolingualism (Ferguson). Diglossia and bilingualism.( Fishman). H (high) and L (low) varieties. Code switching.
Language switching in multilingual communities.Identities.
8. Revision . Assignments presentations.
9. Interactional sociolinguistics. Discourse analysis. Conversation  as structured, non random, sequences of utterances. Cooperative principle (Grice) ; forcing utterance interpretation. Language functions (Jakobson). Direct and indirect speech acts. Intercultural misunderstandings. Interethnic communication differences. Men and women in conversation.Poststructural views on discourse, style and identity.
10. Nation states, monolingualism and multilingualism. Individual and social bilingualism.
Minority languages in nation states. Welsh and Scots Gaelic. ‘Melting pot’ in USA; bilingualism and ‘English Only’.
11. Standardization. E. Haugen’s model. Status planning and corpus planning (H.Kloss) Standardization of English. Samuel Johnson and his dictionary. Standardization of Croatian and Norwegian (Bokmal and Nynorsk). Ausbau languages (Kloss). Standard language ideology.
12. Language and Geography. Traditional dialectology. NORM. The spread of innovations. The loss of /r/ in English. Dialect levelling. Koineization. Dialects in USA. Innovations across language barriers: Schprachbund, Balkanisms.
13. Languages in Contact. Lingua franca. Simplification and reduction  in pidgins. Portuguese as the basic structure of pidgins? Creole. Structural similarities in Creoles.
14. Sociolinguistics and ‘new social sensibilities’(Quirk) . Intentional efforts to change language and language behaviour towards women and minorities. Language discrimination, racism and sexism. ‘Political correctness’.
15. Revision and assignment presentations.

Required reading:
Peter Trudgill: Sociolinguistics, An Introduction to Language and Society. 4th edition, Penguin, 2000.
The Routledge Companion to Sociolinguistics, eds. Carmen Llamas et al. Routledge, 2007.
R. Wardaugh & J.M. Fuller: An Introduction to Sociolinguistics, Wiley Blckwell, 2015.

Suggested Reading:
1. Romaine : Language and Society , Oxford University Press, 2007.
2. Stockwell: Sociolinguistics, A resource book for students,2nd edition, Routledge, 2007.
3. Hudson : Socioliguistics, 2nd edition, Cambridge University Press, 1996.

Political and Legal Institutions in Croatia and English Speaking Countries

Course title: Political and Legal Institutions in Croatia and English Speaking Countries
Instructor: Dr. Snježana Veselica Majhut
ECTS credits: 5
Status: mandatory for students enrolled in the translation track of the graduate program in English as a single major; elective for students enrolled in the translation track of the graduate program in English in combination with another major
Semester: 2nd
Enrollment requirements: The students must pass the exam in Translation Workshop (1st semester) prior to enrolling in this course.
Course description:
The aim of the course is to give a basic understanding and knowledge of political, legal and educational institutions in Croatian and English-speaking societies (the focus is placed on the UK and US), necessary for translators. The students will be made familiar with the key concepts of the institutional organization of the above mentioned societies and further develop translation skills acquired in the Translation Workshop course. The course will focus on highlighting the terminology and cultural problems that characterize translation in the environment of government and non-governmental organizations, public administration, educational institutions.
The course is divided into three blocks, each of them devoted to a particular topic: 1) political institutions and government, 2) legal institutions and 3) educational institutions. The format of the course is lectures and exercises.
Translation assignments cover a wide variety of text types and genres, such as, political speeches, administrative reports, and legal documents. In this one semester schedule, students will get a general overview of the different topics pertinent to the institutional aspects of these societies, with the possibility of pursuing some of the subjects in greater depth through further specialized courses.
The coursework is organized around projects that the students do in groups, partly in the virtual environment, on http://omega.ffzg.hr/ (Moodle). The students are encouraged to use printed and electronic resources, build corpora and terminology glossaries, revise their own and each other’s translations, manage translation projects, cooperate with subject-matter experts and clients, and so on. Guest speakers will be invited to share their professional experience.
Objectives: By the end of the course the students should show a good understanding of the subject matter (both in Croatian and English) of texts similar to those translated in the course, the ability to identify translation problems, use appropriate translation strategies and  terminology.
Course requirements: Students get their final grade on the basis of their “portfolio” (collection of translations done during the course, both at home and in class, individually and in groups), three mid-term quizzes and three translation assignments done in class.
Week by week schedule:

Session Topics Lectures Exercises
1 Introduction. Course description, goals and requirements.    
2-6 Political institutions The organization of the Croatian government.The organization of the US and UK government.Governmental and non-governmental organizations.Guidelines on how to extract terminology, how to carry out documentation research.Visits of professional translators. What is translation for government and public administration? Translating different kinds of government documents, such as speeches, reports, information papers, statements into Croatian and English.Discussion of the main problems related to the translation of these types of texts.Translation assignments.
7-11 Legal institutions Key institutions in Croatia.Key institutions in the US and UK.Various types of legal documents.  Discussion of the main problems related to legal translation.Translation assignments.
12-15 Educational institutions Comparison of the systems of education in relevant societies. Discussion of the main problems related to the translation of various documents related to the educational domain.Translation assignments.

Reading:
– Alcaraz, Enrique, Hughes, Brian and Pym, Anthony: Legal Translation Explained. (2001) – selected chapters
– Mauk, David  and John Oakland: American Civilization. (2009). Abingdon/New York: Routledge. – selected chapters
– Mayoral Asensio, Robert: Translating Official Documents. (2003) – selected chapters
– Oakland, John: British Civilization. (2010). Abingdon/New York: Routledge. – selected chapters
– Vidaković – Mukić, Marta: Opći pravni rječnik (2006). Zagreb: Narodne novine. –  selected items
– Wilson, James, John Jr. Dilulio. and Meena Bose: American Government: Institutions and policies (2011). Cengage Learning – selected chapters
– Zakošek, Nenad: Politički sustav Hrvatske (2002). Zagreb: Fakultet političkih znanosti – selected chapters

 

 

 

 

EU and International Organizations

SYLLABUS
Course title:
EU and International Organizations
Instructor
: Dr. Nataša Pavlović
ECTS:
5
Status:
Mandatory for students enrolled in the translation track of the graduate program in English as a single major; elective for students enrolled in the translation track of the graduate program in English in combination with another major
Semester:
2nd
Enrollment requirements:
The students must pass the exam in Translation of Scientific and Academic Texts (1st semester) prior to enrolling in this course.
Course description:
The course consists of one contact hour of lectures and two contact hours of translation exercises per week. The lectures deal with the following topics: EU institutions and their functioning, history of the EU, EU policies, fundamental rights and freedoms, the single market, the EMU, EU official languages, policy of multilingualism, translation and interpreting for EU institutions, types of legal instruments, translation of the acquis communautaire; the UN, the OSCE, the IMF, the World Bank.
In the exercises, students translate representative samples of texts that they can expect to encounter in their future professional work, such as EU directives, decisions, reports, brochures, web pages, and so on. Translation assignments are done individually and in groups, partly in the virtual environment, on http://omega.ffzg.hr/ (Moodle). The students learn to use the relevant printed and electronic resources created by various Croatian or EU institutions, and also create their own glossaries.
Objectives: By the end of the course the students should be familiar with the EU and its institutions and their functioning, as well as the other important international organizations. They should be able to translate representative samples of texts such as directives, decisions, reports, brochures, web pages and so on. They should be familiar with the relevant printed and electronic resources, and should be able to create their own glossaries of terminology.
Course requirements: Regular course attendance, regular submission of assignments, participation in the online forums as requested; continuous evaluation, final written exam.

Week by week schedule:
Lectures:

Session Topics
1 Introduction. Course contents, goals and requirements.
2 EU at a glance: Flag, symbols, anthem, Europe Day, the Schuman Declaration. Size and population of the EU.
3 EU structure and organization. Main institutions and their functioning, part 1. (Parliament, Council, Commission)
4 Main institutions and their functioning, part 2 (Court of Justice, Court of Auditors, European Economic and Social Committee, Committee of the Regions, European Central Bank, European Investment Bank, European External Action Service)
5 EU history – key dates, treaties, enlargement.
6 EU policies (solidarity and innovation policies)
7 EU official languages. Multilingualism. Translation and interpreting in the EU.
8 Types of community legislation. Translation of the acquis.
9 Rights and freedoms.
10 The single market.
11 Economic and monetary union (EMU). 
12 Croatia and the European integration.
13 The World Bank & IMF.
14 The UN and OSCE.
15 End-of-term test. Student feedback. Suggestions for future work.

Exercises

Session Topics
1-4 Press materials (both directions)
5-8 Texts for the web (both directions)
9-12 Translation of the acquis communautaire into Croatian.
13-14 Translation of Croatian legislature into English.
15 End-of-term test. Student feedback. Suggestions for future work.

Reading:

 On the EU:

http://europa.eu.int/comm/publications/booklets/eu_glance/44/index_en.htm

http://europa.eu.int/comm/publications/booklets/eu_glance/44/index_en.htm,

Fontaine, P., Europe in 12 lessons, (European Commission), 2003, 62 pp

Key facts and figures  about the European Union, European Commission, 2004,

70 pp

Pinder, J., The European Union, A very Short Introduction, OUP, 2001.

Croatian Accession to the European Union,Volume 2. Zagreb: Institut za javne financije and

Friedrich Ebert Stiftung.

 

On translation:

European Commission. Translation Tools and Workflow. Available on:

http://ec.europa.eu/dgs/translation/bookshelf/tools_and_workflow_en.pdf

Šarčević, S., ed. 2001. Legal Translation, Preparation for Accession to the European Union. Rijeka: Faculty of Law, University of Rijeka.

Wagner, E., S. Bech & J. M. Martinez. 2002. Translating for the European Institutions. Manchester: St. Jerome Publishing.

http://europa.eu/languages/en/chapter/15

Glossaries and other translation resources:

Glossaries published by MVPEI, available on:

http://www.mvpei.hr/ei/default.asp?ru=177&sid=&akcija=&jezik=1

The DGT Multilingual Translation Memory of the Acquis Communautaire, available on:

http://langtech.jrc.it/DGT-TM.html

Eurovoc: http://europa.eu/eurovoc/

Eur-lex: http://eur-lex.europa.eu/en/index.htm

Pojmovnik europskih integracija: http://www.mvpei.hr/ei/default.asp?ru=137&sid=&akcija=&jezik=1

Other resources:

Articles and presentations available on http://omega.ffzg.hr/