Category Archives: 2. semestar

English Syntax 1: Word Classes

Course title: English Syntax 1: Word Classes
Course coordinator
: Dr. Irena Zovko Dinković,  Associate Professor
Instructor:
Dr. Anđel Starčević, Assistant Professor
ECTS credits: 6
Semester:
2nd (summer)
Status:
mandatory
Enrollment requirements:
Introduction to the Linguistic Study of English

Required reading is set in boldface.
Week-by-week schedule:

Week
Topic
1.
General information about the course. Brief historical overview of syntactic studies. Prescriptive vs. descriptive. Exercises.
(Crystal 2003:194-195, 2004:400-401; Milroy, 133-139; Trask, 187-211)
2.
Morphology: problems in identifying words, morphemes and allomorphs. Lexical words and function words. Lexical categories. Inflection and derivation. Paradigmatic and syntagmatic relations. Exercises.
(Longman, ch. 2; Van Valin, 6-8, 13-17, 86-87; Miller, ch. 4)
3.
Phrases and Clauses. Clause elements and clause patterns. Grammatical relations: subjects and objects. Exercises. (Longman, ch. 3; Burton-Roberts, 78-90; Miller. ch. 9)
4.
Verb classes in English. Lexical, modal, and primary verbs. (Longman, ch. 5)
5.
Phrasal and prepositional verbs. Exercises.
(Longman, ch. 5; Miller, 51-53; Burton-Roberts, 126-132)
6.
VPs: tense, aspect, voice and modal use. Non-finite clauses. Exercises.
(Longman, ch. 6; Miller, 81-85)
7.
REVISION OF VERBS AND VPs.
8.
Noun classes in English. NPs: determiners. Exercises.
(Longman, ch. 4; Burton-Roberts, 55-58, 154-160; Miller, 53-55)
9.
Pronouns. Exercises. (Longman, ch. 4; Burton-Roberts, 171-173).
10.
NPs: premodification and postmodification. Exercises.
(Longman, ch. 9; Burton-Roberts, 160-164, 166-171)
11.
REVISION OF NOUNS AND NPs.
12.
Adjectives and adjective phrases. Exercises. Prepositions and PPs. Exercises.
(Longman, ch. 7; Burton-Roberts, 62-66, 202, 206, 259)
13.
Adverbs and adverbials. Exercises. (Longman, ch. 7; Miller, 65-66)
14.
Grammatical categories: gender, tense, mood, aspect.
(Miller, 133-142)
15.
FINAL REVISION and COURSE ASSESSMENT. PREPARATION FOR THE EXAM.

Course description:
The course deals with the structure and functions of English words, phrases and clauses, as well as with contrasting them with Croatian grammar. Grammatical phenomena of standard and non-standard language are analysed from a linguistic, descriptive perspective. Students are expected to take an active part in class discussions, read the assigned material and do the related exercises, which are later analysed in class. The final exam is written.

Course objectives:
Introducing students to lexical categories and the constituent structure of English sentences, as well as to the syntactic functions of particular constituents and the interplay between syntax and semantics. Contrasting various linguistic phenomena in English and Croatian.

Required reading:
– Biber
, D., Conrad, S., & Leech, G. (2002). Longman Student Grammar of Spoken and Written English. Harlow, Essex: Longman.
– Crystal, D. (2003). The Cambridge Encyclopaedia of the English Language. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
– Crystal, D. (2004). The Stories of English. London: Penguin Books.
Milroy, J. (2007). “The Ideology of the Standard Language“, in C. Llamas, L. Mullany, & P. Stockwell (Eds), The Routledge Companion to Sociolinguistics. London/New York: Routledge.
Trask, R. (1999). “Attitudes to Language“, in Language: The Basics. (2nd ed.) London/New York: Routledge.
Valin, R. (2001). An Introduction to Syntax. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Suggested reading:
Burton-Roberts, N. (1997). Analysing Sentences: Introduction to English Syntax. Harlow: Longman.
– Carstairs-McCarthy, A. (2002). An Introduction to English Morphology: Words and Their Structure. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
– Greenbaum, S., & Quirk, R. (1990). A Student’s Grammar of the English Language. Harlow: Longman.
– Huddleston, R., & Pullum, G. (2005). A Student’s Introduction to English Grammar. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
– Leech, G. (2004). Meaning and the English Verb (3rd ed.). London: Pearson Longman.
– Matthews, P. (2014). The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Linguistics (3rd ed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press.
– Miller, J. (2002). An Introduction to English Syntax. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
– Trudgill, P., & Hannah, J. (2008). International English: A Guide to the Varieties of Standard English (5th ed.). London: Hodder Education.

Introduction to English literature 2

Course title: Introduction to English literature 2
Course coordinators: Dr. Vanja Polić, Assoc. Prof. and Dr. Sven Cvek, Assist. Prof.
Instructors: Cvek, Polić, Domines Veliki, Klepač, Tutek
ECTS credits: 2
Language: English
Duration: 1 (summer) semester
Status: obligatory
Enrolment requirements: regular attendance and active participation or  a pass mark in Introduction to English literature 1 is a minimal prerequisite for the enrolment in Introduction to English literature 2.

Course type: 1 hour of seminar weekly, the classes will be conducted as 2 hours of seminar every two weeks

Course requirements: The students have to fulfil the requirements of continuous assessment and get a passing grade in their research papers.

Course description: The course offers an overview of the main ideas and debates in modern literary theory and serves as a starting point for acquiring the skills needed to critically analyse and engage with a text. Every other week, discussion will focus on a given theoretical approach to show how it illuminates literary and other texts in particular ways. Students will be expected to read a selected shorter work of fiction for in-class discussion and analysis. Students will also be expected to write regular short assignments, as well as a final paper.

Objective: The course’s goal is to enable students to conduct independent research and acquire the basic principles of academic writing.

Student obligations: The final grade is based on continuous assessment which includes regular attendance (max. absences allowed: 2), preparation for and participation in class, and timely submission of the final paper. The paper is worth 60%, and other elements of continuous assessment are worth 40% of the final grade. Students must fulfil all elements of continuous assessment to pass the course.

Weekly schedule:
*Students will receive guidelines from the instructor to prepare texts for the next session.
Week 1
Course overview + student obligations
Academic writing skills
*Student assignment for week 2

Week 2
Structuralism
– Claude Lévi-Strauss (bricolage, mytheme, binary oppositions)
– Vladimir Propp (the narrative language of a folktale)
– A.J. Greimas (universal grammar of narrative)
* Student assignment for week 3

Week 3
Poststructuralism/deconstruction
– Roland Barthes “The Death of the Author”, S/Z
– logocentrism/phonocentrism vs. différance (Jacques Derrida);
– misreading, the anxiety of influence/belatedness (Harold Bloom)
– metahistory (Hayden White)
* Student assignment for week 4

Week 4
Psychoanalytic criticism
– Freud: das Unheimliche/the uncanny; dreamwork (displacement & condensation); repression & sublimation; ego-superego-id; Oedipus complex
– Lacan: displacement/condensation & metonymy/metaphor; the real, imaginary, symbolic; mirror stage; other/Other
* Student assignment for week 5

Week 5
Feminist criticism
– feminism/femaleness/femininity (Toril Moi)
– écriture féminine (Hélène Cixous)
– symbolic and semiotic aspect of language (Julia Kristeva)
* Student assignment for week 6

Week 6
Historical materialism
– capital; ideology; class; hegemony; structure of feeling; form as “abstract of social relations”; literature and the world-system; totality; cognitive mapping
– Leon Trotsky “Literature and Revolution”; Raymond Williams “Marxism and Literature”; Fredric Jameson “The Political Unconscious”; Franco Moretti “Distant Reading” (selection)
* Student assignment for week 7

Week 7
Postcolonial theory of culture
– colonial/colonialist literature; colonial tropes; Orientalism (Said); hybridity (Bhabha); cultural diversity vs. cultural difference (Bhabha); mimicry (Lacan/Fanon/Bhabha), subaltern (Spivak); synergy (Young); transculturation, multiculturalism, dislocation; abrogation and appropriation (Ashcroft et al), metonymic gap

Reading list:
 Literary texts as selected by individual instructor (provided in class)
 Peter Barry, Beginning Theory: An Introduction to Literary and Cultural Theory, Manchester/New York: Manchester University Press, 2002 (1995). (selection)
 David Lodge, ed. Modern Criticism and Theory: A Reader. London/New York: Longman, 1991 (1988). (selection)
 Vincent B. Leitch, gen. ed. The Norton Anthology of Criticism and Theory. New York/London: W.W. Norton, 2001. (selection)
 MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers. 7th Edition. New York: The Modern Language Association of America. 2009.

English Syntax 1: Word Classes (2015/16)

Course title: English Syntax 1: Word Classes
Course coordinator
: Irena Zovko Dinković, PhD, associate professor
Instructor:
Anđel Starčević, PhD, senior research assistant
ECTS credits: 6
Semester:
2nd (summer)
Status:
mandatory
Enrollment requirements:
passed exam in Introduction to the Study of the English Language
Objectives:
Introducing the students to lexical categories and constituent structure of sentences in the English language, as well as the syntactic function of particular constituent and sentence parts and the interplay between syntax and semantics.

Obligatory reading is set in boldface.
Week-by-week schedule:

Week
Topic
1.
General information about the course. Brief historical overview of syntactic studies. Prescriptive vs. descriptive. Exercises.
(Crystal 2003:194-195, 2004:400-401; Milroy, 133-139; Trask, 187-211)
2.
Morphology: problems in identifying words, morphemes and allomorphs. Lexical words and function words. Lexical categories. Inflection and derivation. Paradigmatic and syntagmatic relations. Exercises.
(Longman, ch. 2; Van Valin, 6-8, 13-17, 86-87; Miller, ch. 4)
3.
Phrases and Clauses. Clause elements and clause patterns. Grammatical relations: subjects and objects. Exercises. (Longman, ch. 3; Burton-Roberts, 78-90; Miller. ch. 9)
4.
Verb classes in English. Lexical, modal, and primary verbs. (Longman, ch. 5)
5.
Phrasal and prepositional verbs. Exercises.
(Longman, ch. 5; Miller, 51-53; Burton-Roberts, 126-132)
6.
VPs: tense, aspect, voice and modal use. Non-finite clauses. Exercises.
(Longman, ch. 6; Miller, 81-85)  1st ASSIGNMENT DUE
7.
REVISION OF VERBS AND VPs.
8.
Noun classes in English. NPs: determiners. Exercises.
(Longman, ch. 4; Burton-Roberts, 55-58, 154-160; Miller, 53-55)
9.
Pronouns. Exercises. (Longman, ch. 4; Burton-Roberts, 171-173).
10.
NPs: premodification and postmodification. Exercises.
(Longman, ch. 9; Burton-Roberts, 160-164, 166-171)
11.
REVISION OF NOUNS AND NPs.
12.
Adjectives and adjective phrases. Exercises. Prepositions and PPs. Exercises.
(Longman, ch. 7; Burton-Roberts, 62-66, 202, 206, 259)
13.
Adverbs and adverbials. Exercises. (Longman, ch. 7; Miller, 65-66)
14.
Grammatical categories: gender, tense, mood, aspect.
(Miller, 133-142) 2nd ASSIGNMENT DUE
15.
FINAL REVISION and COURSE ASSESSMENT. PREPARATION FOR THE EXAM.

Course description:
After each unit students do a number of exercises in class, which they check with the instructor. They are also expected to read the relevant parts of the obligatory readings and then do exercises and assignments which they are given as homework.

Course requirements:
Students should attend classes regularly and take an active part in class discussions. During the semester, there are two to three reviews. The last week of the course is dedicated to the preparation for the exam. The exam is written.

Required reading:
– Biber
, D., Conrad, S., & Leech, G. (2002). Longman Student Grammar of Spoken and Written English. Harlow, Essex: Longman.
– Crystal, D. (2003). The Cambridge Encyclopaedia of the English Language. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
– Crystal, D. (2004). The Stories of English. London: Penguin Books.
Milroy, J. (2007). “The Ideology of the Standard Language“, in C. Llamas, L. Mullany, & P. Stockwell (Eds), The Routledge Companion to Sociolinguistics. London/New York: Routledge.
Trask, R. (1999). “Attitudes to Language“, in Language: The Basics. (2nd ed.) London/New York: Routledge.
Valin, R. (2001). An Introduction to Syntax. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Recommended reading:
Burton-Roberts, N. (1997). Analysing Sentences: Introduction to English Syntax. Harlow: Longman.
– Carstairs-McCarthy, A. (2002). An Introduction to English Morphology: Words and Their Structure. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
– Greenbaum, S., & Quirk, R. (1990). A Student’s Grammar of the English Language. Harlow: Longman.
– Huddleston, R., & Pullum, G. (2005). A Student’s Introduction to English Grammar. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
– Leech, G. (2004). Meaning and the English Verb (3rd ed.). London: Pearson Longman.
– Matthews, P. (2014). The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Linguistics (3rd ed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press.
– Miller, J. (2002). An Introduction to English Syntax. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
– Trudgill, P., & Hannah, J. (2008). International English: A Guide to the Varieties of Standard English (5th ed.). London: Hodder Education.

English Syntax 1: Word Classes – ARCH

Course title: English Syntax 1: Word Classes
Course coordinator
: Irena Zovko Dinković, PhD, assistant professor
Instructor:
Anđel Starčević, teaching assistant
Status:
mandatory
ECTS credits:
6
Semester:
2nd (summer)
Enrollment requirements:
passed exam in Introduction to the Study of the English Language
Objectives:
to introduce the students to lexical categories and constituent structure of sentences in the English language, as well as the syntactic function of particular constituent and sentence parts and the interplay between syntax and semantics
Week by week schedule:

Obligatory reading is set in boldface.

Week Topic
1. General information about the course. Brief historical overview of syntactic studies. Prescriptive vs. descriptive. Exercises. (Crystal, 194-195 (1), 400-401 (2),  Trask, 187-211) 
2. Morphology: problems in identifying words, morphemes and allomorphs. Lexical words and function words. Lexical categories. Inflection and derivation. Paradigmatic and syntagmatic relations. Exercises.
(Longman, ch. 2, Van Valin, pp. 6-8, 13-17, 86-87, Miller, ch. 4) 
3. Phrases and Clauses. Clause elements and clause patterns. Grammatical relations: subjects and objects. Exercises. (Longman, ch. 3, Burton-Roberts, pp. 78-90, Miller. ch. 9)
4. Noun classes in English. NPs: determiners. Exercises. (Longman, ch. 4; Burton-Roberts, pp. 55-58, 154-160; Miller, pp. 53-55)
5. Pronouns. Exercises. (Longman, ch. 4; Burton-Roberts, pp. 171-173). 
6. NPs: premodification and postmodification. Exercises. (Longman, ch. 9; Burton-Roberts, pp. 160-164, 166-171)
7. REVIEW OF NOUNS AND NPs. 
8. Adjectives and adjective phrases. Exercises. Prepositions and PPs. Exercises. (Longman, ch. 7; Burton-Roberts, pp. 62-66, 202, 206, 259)
9. Adverbs and adverbials. Exercises. (Longman, ch. 7; Miller, pp. 65-66)
10. Verb classes in English. Lexical, modal, and primary verbs. (Longman, ch. 5) 
11. Phrasal and prepositional verbs. Exercises. (Longman, ch. 5, Miller, pp. 51-53; Burton-Roberts, pp. 126-132)
12. VPs: tense, aspect, voice and modal use. Non-finite clauses. Exercises. (Longman, ch. 6, Miller, pp. 81-85)
13. REVIEW OF VERBS AND VPs.
14. Grammatical categories: Gender, Tense, Mood, Aspect (Miller, pp. 133-142) 
15. FINAL REVIEW and COURSE ASSESSMENT. PREPARATION FOR THE EXAM.

Course description:
After each unit, the students solve a number of tasks in the class, which they check with the instructor. They are also expected to read at home the relevant parts of the obligatory readings and then solve exercises and assignments that they are given as homework.

Course requirements:
Students should attend the classes regularly and actively participate in class. During the semester, there are two to three reviews. The last week of the course is dedicated to the preparation of students for the exam. The exam is written.

Obligatory reading (selected chapters and pages):
– Biber, Douglas; Susan Conrad; Geoffrey Leech (2002). Student Grammar of Spoken and Written English, Harlow: Longman
– Crystal, David (2003). (1) The Cambridge Encyclopedia of the English Language,
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press   
– Van Valin, Robert D. Jr. (2001). An Introduction to Syntax, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

Suggested reading:
– Burton-Roberts, Noel (1997). Analysing Sentences: Introduction to English Syntax, Harlow: Longman
– Crystal, David (2004). (2) The Stories of English, London: Penguin Books
– Huddleston, Rodney & Geoffrey Pullum (2005). A Student’s Introduction to English Grammar. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
 
– Lyons, John (1981). Language and Linguistics, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
– Miller, Jim (2001). An Introduction to English Syntax, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press
– Palmer, Frank R. (1995). (second edition). Semantics, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
– Robins, Robert H. (1997). A Short History of Linguistics, Longman
– Trask, R. L. (1999). Language: the Basics, London, New York: Routledge
– Wekker, Herman & Haegeman, Liliane (1996 [1985]). A Modern Course in English Syntax, London, New York: Routledge

 

 

 

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Contemporary English language 2

Course title: Contemporary English Language 2
Instructors
: Bukvić Pažin, Majerović, Zgaga, Zubak Pivarski
ECTS credits:
5
Semester:
2nd (summer)
Status:
mandatory
Form of instruction
: language classes, 4 classes a week
Enrolment requirements:
students must have attended Contemporary English Language 1
Course requirements:
written and oral exam

Course description:
This course focuses on normative grammar of the contemporary English language, placing special emphasis on syntactic units and their features, and on the reading of texts in order to expand vocabulary and develop written and oral communication skills.

Objectives:
The objective of the course is for students to develop their abilities of comprehension, as well as written and oral expression in English through various reading, writing, listening and speaking exercises, and through the individual study of grammatical patterns. Students are also taught how to use various reference books, especially dictionaries and grammar handbooks.

Reading:
TEXTS:
– A Reader for Students of Contemporary English Language 1 and 2
– Bašić, Ivana; Zubak Pivarski, Marina: A Reader for Contemporary English Language 1 and 2, Zagreb: FF press, 2013
– Bašić, Ivana; Majerović, Marko; Zubak Pivarski, Marina: Grammar Workbook for Contemporary English Language 2, Hrvatska sveučilišna naklada, Zagreb, 2018

GRAMMAR BOOKS:
– Eastwood, John (2005). Oxford Learner’s Grammar: grammar finder, Oxford: Oxford University Press
– Swan, Michael (2005). Practical English Usage, Oxford: Oxford University Press
– Biber, Douglas; Susan Conrad; Geoffrey Leech (2002). Student Grammar of Spoken and Written English, Harlow: Longman, (Chapters 2, 3)
– Eastwood, John (1994). Oxford Guide to English Grammar, Oxford: Oxford University Press (out of print)
– Karlovčan, Vjekoslav (2002). A Survey of English Grammar, Zagreb: Profil International
– Grammar Exercises for Students of CEL 2
 (exercise book/workbook)

DICTIONARIES:
Students are required to use on a regular basis at least one monolingual dictionary of the English language:
e.g. Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary. Seventh edition. Oxford University Press. Oxford, 2005

Week by week schedule:

1. FINITE AND NON-FINITE FORMS
–   infinitives, gerunds, participles
–   non-finite clauses
2. SENTENCE TYPES AND DISCOURSE FUNCTIONS
–   questions, statements, imperatives, exclamations
3. 1ST TEXT FROM THE READER
–   comprehension and vocabulary
4. THE VERB PHRASE IN SUBORDINATE CLAUSES
–   indirect speech
–   review – tenses and aspects
5. 1ST TEXT FROM THE READER
–   vocabulary and translation
6. THE VERB PHRASE IN SUBORDINATE CLAUSES
–   time clauses
7. 2ND TEXT FROM THE READER
–   comprehension and vocabulary
8. THE VERB PHRASE IN SUBORDINATE CLAUSES
–   expressing hypothesis – hypothetical and other conditionals
9. 2ND TEXT FROM THE READER
–   vocabulary and translation
10. REVISION – grammar and vocabulary
11.  TEST – grammar (tenses, modals, verb phrase in subordinate clauses)
12. TEST – discussion
13. ADVERBS & ADVERBIALS
–  syntactic and semantic role
14.  3RD TEXT FROM THE READER
–   comprehension and vocabulary
15. NOUNS
–    types of nouns
–    the noun phrase – premodification/postmodification
16. 3RD TEXT FROM THE READER
–    vocabulary
17.  NOUNS
–  countable/uncountable; plurals of nouns
–  agreement
–  gender
18. 3. TEKST IZ ZBIRKE – vocabulary and translation 
19.  ARTICLES
–   introduction
20.  4TH TEXT FROM THE READER
–   comprehension and vocabulary
21.  ARTICLES
–    exercises
22. 4TH TEXT FROM THE READER
–   vocabulary and translation
23. POSSESSIVES, DEMONSTRATIVES, PRONOUNS
24. QUANTIFIERS AND NUMERALS & MEASUREMENTS
25. PREPOSITIONS
26. PHRASAL, PREPOSITIONAL AND PHRASAL-PREPOSITIONAL VERBS
27.  PREPOSITIONS AND MULTI-WORD VERBS – revision and exercises
28.  ADJECTIVES
29. REVISION – grammar and vocabulary
30. REVISION