Category Archives: 9. semestar – NASTAVNIČKI SMJER – jednopredmetni

Bilingualism

GRADUATE PROGRAMME – Master of Education in English Language and Literature

SINGLE AND DOUBLE MAJOR PROGRAMMES

semester 3

Course title: BILINGUALISM
Course coordinator:
Assistant Professor Renata Geld
Lecturer:
Stela Letica, Ph.D.
ECTS credits:
5
Language of instruction:
English
Duration:
semester III
Status:
elective
Form of instruction:
2 hours of lectures + 2 hours of seminar
Prerequisites: —
Examination:
continual assessment

Contents:
Definitions of bilingualism; overview of research in the field; relationship between individual and social bilingualism; dynamics of bilingual development (in natural and institutionalized contexts); language processing in bilingual individuals; crosslinguistic interaction within the bilingual system; communicative competence of bilinguals; monolingual and bilingual modes; code switching; language attrition; bilingualism and cognition; bilingualism and education.

Objectives:
Getting an insight into basic processes of bilingual development, specific aspects of linguistic and communicative competence of bilinguals and bilingual education.

Literature (selected chapters):
Aronin, L., & Singleton, D. (2012). Multilingualism (Vol. 30). John Benjamins Publishing.
Auer, P., & Wei, L. (Eds.).(2007). Handbook of multilingualism and multilingual communication (Vol. 5). Walter de Gruyter.
Cenoz, J., Hufeisen, B., & Jessner, U. (2003). The multilingual lexicon. Springer Netherlands.
Cenoz, J. (2009). Towards multilingual education: Basque educational research from an international perspective (Vol. 72). Multilingual Matters.
Helot, C.,&O’Laoire, M. (2011). Language Policy for the Multilingual Classroom. Bristol: Multilingual Matters.
Todeva, E., & Cenoz, J. (Eds.). (2009). The multiple realities of multilingualism: Personal narratives and researchers’ perspectives (Vol. 3). Walter de Gruyter.
Journals: Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, International Journal of Multilingualism, Language Awareness, Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development

 

Multilingualism

Course title: MULTILINGUALISM
Course coordinator
: Renata Geld, Ph.D.
Lecturer: Stela Letica Krevelj, Ph.D.
ECTS credits: 3
Languageofinstruction: English
Duration: semester IX
Status: elective
Form of instruction: 2 hours of lecture and 2 hours of seminar
Prerequisites: Process of language acquisition (or Second language acquisition) and TEFL or equivalent courses in other graduate programmes.
Examination: written exam

Contents: Individual and societal multilingualism, multiple language acquisition, characteristics of multilingual users, crosslinguistic interaction, language development in multilingual conditions, models of multilingualism, multilingualism and assessment, research on multilingualism, multilingualism and English, multilingualism and emotions, multilingualism and eduction, identities and attitudes, multilingualism and teaching
Objectives: Getting an insight into basic processes of multilingual development at the level of individual speaker as well as at the societal level. Becoming familiar with multilingualism’s linguistic, cultural, sociological, educational and psychological dimensions

Literature:
Required
Aronin, L. & Hufeisen, B. (2009). The Exploration of Multilingualism. Amsterdam: J. Benjamins. . [selected chapters]

Auer, P. & Wei, L. (Eds.) (2007). Handbook of Multilingualism and Multilingual Communication. Mouton de Gruyter. [selected chapters]

Cenoz, J. (2009). Towards Multilingual Education. Bristol: Multilingual Matters. [selected chapters]

Herdina, P. & Jessner, U. (2002). A Dynamic Model of Multilingualism: Perspectives of Change in Psycholinguistics. Multilingual Matters Ltd.

Weber, J-J., & Horner, K. (2012). Introducing Multilingualism: A social approach. London: Routledge. [selected chapters]

Additional
Aronin, L. & Singleton, D. (2012). Multilingualism. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company.

Helot, C. & O’Laoire, M. (2011). Language Policy for the Multilingual Classroom: Pedagogy of the Possible. Bristol: Multilingual Matters.

Pavlenko, A. (2007). Emotions and Multilingualism. Cambridge University Press.

Singleton, D., Fishman, J.A., Aronin, L., O’Laoire, M. (2013) (Eds). Current Multilingualism: A New linguistic dispensation. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter.

Journals: International Journal of Multilingualism, Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism

Week Topics
1 Individual and societal multilingualism
2 Multiple language acquisition
3 Characteristics of multilingual users
4 Crosslinguistic interaction
5 Language development in multilingual conditions
6 Models of multilingualism
7 Multilingualism and assessment
8 Revision –Test 1
9 Research on multilingualism
10 Multilingualism and English
11 Multilingualism and emotions
12 Multilingualism and eduction
13 Identities and attitudes
14 Multilingualism and teaching
15 Revision – Test 2

 

Learning English at an Early School Age

Course title: LEARNING ENGLISH AT AN EARLY SCHOOL AGE
Instructors:
Asst. Prof. Renata Geld, Mihajla Ćavar Portolan
ECTS credits
: 5
Semester
: IX
Status
: elective
Enrollment requirements:
none
Course description
: Rationale for early learning of a foreign language; overview of research in the field; child abilities and limitations with respect to acquiring a foreign language at that stage (age 6-10) of linguistic, cognitive, affective and motorical development; overview and analysis of classroom teaching strategies that have been shown to be successful in teaching English to young learners.
Objectives
: Students will get an insight into the main concepts of the age factor and early FL learning. They will be prepared to start teaching English to young learners and to develop a reflective approach to their teaching.
Course requirements:
Students are expected to do the readings selected by the course instructor. High level of participation, especially in seminars, is expected. If students pass two revision tests, they do not have to sit for the final oral exam.
Week by week schedule:

week topics
1 Introduction; Key concepts
2 Early language learning and the age factor concept
3 Linguistic, cognitive, affective and motorical development of young learners
4 Research into early language learning
5 REVISION – Test 1
6 TPR and other teaching techniques in early language teaching
7 Errors and approach to error correction in early language learning
8 Role of media in early language teaching
9 Role of teacher in early language learning
10 REVISION – Test 2
11 Development of linguistic and communicative competence
12 Development of cultural awareness
13 Assessment and self-assessment in early language teaching
14 Expectations, aims and possible achievements of early FL programmes
15 REVISION – Test 3

Required reading:
– Brewster, J., Ellis, G., Girard, P. (2002). The Primary English Teacher’s Guide. Harlow, UK: Pearson Education Limited.
– Enever, J. (ur.) (2011). ELLiE. Early language learning in Europe. London: British Council. [selected chapters]
– Enever, J., Moon, J. & Raman, U. (ur.) (2009). Young Learner English Language Policy and Implementation: International Perspectives. Reading, UK: Garnet Publishing Ltd. [selected chapters]
– Mihaljević Djigunović, J. (2009). Individual differences in early language programmes. In: M. Nikolov (ur.),The age factor and early language learning, 199-225. Berlin-New York: Mouton de Gruyter
– Mihaljević Djigunović, J. (2012). Early EFL learning in context – Evidence from a country case study. London: The British Council.
– Moon, J. i Nikolov, M. (ur.) Research into Teaching English to Young Learners. Pecs: University Press PECS. [selected chapters]
– Nikolov, M. (ur.) (2009). Early learning of modern foreign languages. Processes and outcomes. Bristol, UK: Multilingual Matters. [selected chapters]
– Nikolov, M. (ur.) (2009). The age factor and early language learning. Berlin-New York: Mouton de Gruyter. [selected chapters]
– Nikolov, M. i Mihaljević Djigunović, J. (2006). Recent research on age, second language acquisition, and early foreign language learning, ARAL 26: 234-260.
– Nikolov, M. & Mihaljević Djigunović, J. (2011). All shades of every color: An overview of early teaching and learning of foreign languages. ARAL, 31: 95-119.
– Vilke, M., Vrhovac, Y. (ur.) (1995). Children and Foreign Languages II. Zagreb: Filozofski fakultet. [selected chapters]

Recommended reading:
– Berk, L. E. (2010). Exploring lifespan development. Boston, MA: Pearson Education, Inc. [selected chapters]
– Mihaljević Djigunović, J. (2009). Impact of learning conditions on young FL learners’ motivation. In M. Nikolov (ur.), Early learning of modern foreign languages. Processes and outcomes, 75-89. Bristol, UK: Multilingual Matters
– Nikolov, M., Curtain, H. (ur.) (2000). An early start: Young learners and modern languages in Europe and beyond. Strasbourg: Council of Europe.

– Nikolov, M. (2002). Issues in English Language Education. Wien: Peter Lang.
– Pinter, A. (2011). Children learning second languages. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave MacMillan. [selected chapters]
– Szulc-Kurpaska, M. (2007). Teaching and researching very young learners: “They are unpredictable”. In M. Nikolov, J. Mihaljević Djigunović, M. Mattheoudakis, G. Lundberg, & T. Flanagan (ur.), Teaching modern languages to young learners: Teachers, curricula and materials, 35-46. Strasbourg: Council of Europe.
– Vilke, M. (1991). Vaše dijete i jezik. Zagreb: Školska knjiga.

– Vilke, M., Vrhovac, Y. (ur.) (1993). Children and Foreign Languages I. Zagreb: Filozofski fakultet. [selected chapters]
– Vrhovac, Y. (ur.) (1999). Strani jezik u osnovnoj školi. Zagreb: Naprijed.
– Vrhovac, Y. (ur.) (2001). Children and Foreign Languages III. Zagreb: Filozofski fakultet. [selected chapters]

 

 

 

 

Application of cognitive linguistics in learning and teaching L2

Course title: Application of cognitive linguistics in learning and teaching L2
Instructors: Renata Geld, PhD
ECTS credits: 5
Status: elective
Semester: III
Enrollment requirements: recommended for students with basic knowledge of cognitive linguistics

Course description and objectives: The course offers fundamental aspects of the cognitive linguistic theoretical framework that are relevant for current trends in SLA and TEFL. Upon completing the course the students will be able to do the following: recognize relevant elements from the cognitive linguistic framework and apply them in practice; adjust teaching material and their approach to teaching lexicon and grammar by paying attention to the idea of cognitive motivation in language and its symbolic nature; and consolidate previous knowledge about language, language acquisition, and language teaching in terms of what they have learnt from the cognitive linguistic description of language.

Week by week schedule:

week Topics
1 Fundamental concepts
Introduction
2 Fundamental concepts: the nature of language and language vis-à-vis other cognitive processes
3 Fundamental concepts: aspects of conceptual structure and construal
4 Fundamental concepts: cognitive motivation in language / the nature of grammar/lexicon
5 REVISION
Test 1
6 Language as an experiential phenomenon: L1 vis-à-vis L2
7 Strategic construal (L2 construal): cognitive learning strategies vis-à-vis general cognitive processes
8 Strategic construal (L2 construal): from specificity to schematicity / from idiomaticity to grammar
9 Learning L2 by insight: grammar as conceptual structure/meaningfulness of grammar/”making sense” of grammar
10 REVISION
Test 2
11 Ways of testing theory in practice
12 Ways of testing theory in practice: microproject I – plans and drafts
13 Consolidation
14 Ways of testing theory in practice: microproject II – reports
15 Ways of testing theory in practice: microproject II – reports

 

Required reading:
1) Achard, M. and Niemeier, S. (eds.) 2004. Cognitive Linguistics, Second Language Acquisition, and Foreign Languge Teaching. Walter de Gruyter Inc. (selected chapters)

2) Geld, R. and Đurđek, S. 2009. Gradience in L2 procesing: the importance of the non-protoypical, u Brdar, M., Omazić, M. i Pavičić-Takač V. (ed.) Cognitive Approaches to English: Some Fundamental Interdisciplinary and Applied Aspects, Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
3) Geld, R. 2006. Konceptualizacija i vidovi konstruiranja značenja: temeljne postavke i pojmovi kognitivnolingvističkog teorijskog okvira, Suvremena lingvistika, 62, pp. 183-211.
4) Geld, R. 2006. Strateško konstruiranje značenja engleskih fraznih glagola, Jezikoslovlje, 7.1-2, str. 67-111.
5) Putz M., Niemeier S., Dirven R. (ed..) 2001. Applied Cognitive Linguistics I: Theory and Language Acquisition.Berlin/ New York: Mouton de Gruyter (selected chapters).
6) Putz, M., Niemeier, S., Dirven, R. (ed.) 2001. Applied Cognitive Linguistics II: Language Pedagogy. Berlin/New York: Mouton de Gruyter (selected chapters).

7) Radden, G. i Dirven, R. 2007. Cognitive English Grammar. Amsterdam/ Philadelphia: John Benjamins (odabrana poglavlja).

Recommended reading:
1) Aarts, B., Denison, D., Keizer, E., Popova, G. (ed.) 2003. Fuzzy Grammar. Oxford: Oxford University Press

2) Dirven, R. and Verspoor, M. 2004. Cognitive Exploration of Language and Linguistics. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins
3) Rudzka-Ostyn, B. 2003. Word Power: Phrasal Verbs and Compounds, A Cognitive Approach. Berlin/New York: Mouton de Gruyter

 

 

Learning English at an Early School Age-archive

Course title: LEARNING ENGLISH AT AN EARLY SCHOOL AGE
Instructor:
Professor Jelena Mihaljević Djigunović, PhD.
ECTS credits
: 5
Semester
: IX
Status
: elective
Enrollment requirements:
none
Course description
: Rationale for early learning of a foreign language; overview of research in the field; child abilities and limitations with respect to acquiring a foreign language at that stage (age 6-10) of linguistic, cognitive, affective and motorical development; overview and analysis of classroom teaching strategies that have been shown to be successful in teaching English to young learners.
Objectives
: Students will get an insight into the main concepts of the age factor and early FL learning. They will be prepared to start teaching English to young learners and to develop a reflective approach to their teaching.
Course requirements:
Students are expected to do the readings selected by the course instructor. High level of participation, especially in seminars, is expected. If students pass two revision tests, they do not have to sit for the final oral exam.
Week by week schedule:

week topics
1 Introduction; Key concepts
2 Early language learning and the age factor concept
3 Linguistic, cognitive, affective and motorical development of young learners
4 Research into early language learning
5 REVISION – Test 1
6 TPR and other teaching techniques in early language teaching
7 Errors and approach to error correction in early language learning
8 Role of media in early language teaching
9 Role of teacher in early language learning
10 REVISION – Test 2
11 Development of linguistic and communicative competence
12 Development of cultural awareness
13 Assessment and self-assessment in early language teaching
14 Expectations, aims and possible achievements of early FL programmes
15 REVISION – Test 3

Required reading:
– Brewster, J. & Ellis, G., Girard, P. (2002). The Primary English Teacher’s Guide. Harlow, UK: Pearson Education Limited.
– Enever, J. (ed) (2011). ELLiE. Early language learning in Europe. London: British Council. [selected chapters]
– Enever, J., Moon, J. & Raman, U. (eds) (2009). Young Learner English Language Policy and Implementation: International Perspectives. Reading, UK: Garnet Publishing Ltd. [selected chapters]
– Mihaljević Djigunović, J. (2009). Individual differences in early language programmes. In: M. Nikolov (ed.), The age factor and early language learning, 199-225. Berlin-New York: Mouton de Gruyter.
– Mihaljević Djigunović, J. (2012). Early EFL learning in context – Evidence from a country case study. London: The British Council.
– Moon, J. & Nikolov, M. (eds) Research into Teaching English to Young Learners. Pecs: University Press PECS. [selected chapters]
– Nikolov, M. (ed) (2009). Early learning of modern foreign languages. Processes and outcomes. Bristol, UK: Multilingual Matters. [selected chapters]
– Nikolov, M. (ed) (2009). The age factor and early language learning. Berlin-New York: Mouton de Gruyter. [odabrana poglavlja]
– Nikolov, M. & Mihaljević Djigunović, J. (2006). Recent research on age, second language acquisition, and early foreign language learning, ARAL 26: 234-260.
– Nikolov, M. & Mihaljević Djigunović, J. (2011). All shades of every color: An overview of early teaching and learning of foreign languages. ARAL, 31: 95-119.
– Vilke, M. & Vrhovac, Y. (eds) (1995). Children and Foreign Languages II. Zagreb: Filozofski fakultet. [selected chapters]

Bilingualism and Multilingualism (archive)

Course title: BILINGUALISM AND MULTILINGUALISM
Instructors: Professor Jelena Mihaljević Djigunović, Marta Medved Krajnović, PhD., Renata Geld, Stela Letica Krevelj
ECTS credits: 5
Status: elective

Semester: IX
Enrollment requirements: none
Course description: Definitions of bilingualism; overview of research in the field; relationship between individual and social bilingualism; dynamics of bilingual development (in natural and institutionalized contexts); language processing in bilingual individuals; cross-linguistic interaction within the bilingual system; communicative competence of bilinguals; monolingual and bilingual modes; code switching; language attrition; bilingualism and cognition; bilingualism and education.

Objectives: Students will gain an insight into the complexity and diversity of psycholinguistic, socio-cultural and emotional processes in bilingual and multilingual development. They will develop an understanding of the issues specific to bilingual and multilingual education.

Course requirements Students are expected to do the readings selected by the course instructor. High level of participation, especially in seminars, is expected. If students pass two revision tests, they do not have to sit for the final oral exam.

Week by week schedule:

week

Topics

1

Introduction; Bilingualism and multilingualism – definitions and classifications

2

Development of bilingualism and multilingualism

3

Measurement of bilingualism and multilingualism

4

Theories of bilingualism and multilingualism (part I)

5

Theories of bilingualism and multilingualism (part II)

6

Bilingual/multilingual speech – language mode and code-switching

7

REVISION – Test 1

8

Cognition and bilingualism / multilingualism

9

Emotions and bilingualism / multilingualism

10

Bilingual and multilingual education

11

Education of bilinguals and mutilinguals

12

Languages in Society

13

Language loss, language attrition and language maintenance / revitalization

14

Multiculturalism

15

REVISION – Test 2

 

Required reading:

Altarriba, J., Herredia, R.R. (ed.) (2008). An Introduction to Bilingualism: Principles and Processes. New York, London: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Auer, P., Wei, L. (ed.) (2007). Handbook of Multilingualism and Multilingual Communication. Mouton de Gruyter.

Baker, C. (2000). The Care and Education of Young Bilinguals: An Itroduction for Professionals. Clevedon: Multilingual Matters Ltd.

Hamers, J., Blanc, M. (2000). Bilinguality and Bilingualism. 2nd edition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Bialystok, E. (2001). Bilingualism in Development: Language, Literacy and Cognition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Herdina, P., Jessner, U. (2002). A Dynamic Model of Multilingualism: Perspectives of Change in Psycholinguistics. Clevedon, Buffalo, Toronto, Sydney: Multilingual Matters Ltd.

 

Recommended reading:

Bhatia, T. K., Ritchie, W. C. (2007). The Handbook of Bilingualism. Blackwell Publisihing Ltd.

Kroll, J. F., De Groot, A. M. B. (2005). Handbook of Bilingualism: Psycholinguistic Approaches. Oxford: OUP

Journals: Bilingualism: Language and Cognition; International Journal of Bilingualism; International Journal of Multilingualism

 

 

 

Practicum 3 (9th sem)

Course title: PRACTICUM 3
Instructors: Asst. Prof. Renata Geld
ECTS credits: 3 credits
Status: mandatory
Semester: IX
Enrollment requirements: none
Course description: Practical aspects of teaching learners of different ages. Practical aspects of teaching very young learners. Practical aspects of teaching lower primary learners. Practical aspects of teaching upper primary learners. Practical aspects of teaching secondary school learners. Practical aspects of teaching adult learners. Practical aspects of teaching ESP. Designing teaching activities for different age and proficiency of learners. Analyzing and adapting teaching materials. Using media in teaching. Using ICT in EFL teaching. Assessing effective teaching. Post-teaching reflection. Self-assessment of teaching. Reacting to feedback. Cooperation with mentors.
Objectives: Students will develop competence in assessing effectiveness of different teaching strategies that they will observe. They will develop further their lesson planning skills and the ability to evaluate others’ and self-evaluate own ELT competence. They will get extensive classroom teaching experience in different teaching contexts. Students will develop a feeling of professional responsibility.
Course requirements
: During practicums students will be prepared for independent teaching in schools they’ll be assigned to. They will be expected to develop lesson plans and required teaching materials for every lesson they will be teaching. Students will also keep a teaching practice diary. Their final mark will depend on the evaluation of the part of the portfolio collected during the 9th semester and the evaluation of students’ independent teaching.
Week by week schedule:

Week Topics
1 Introduction
2 Designing activities for different age groups of learners.
3 Designing activities for different levels of proficiency.
4 Classroom teaching in school.
5 Classroom teaching in school.
6 Classroom teaching in school.
7 Classroom teaching in school.
8 Classroom teaching in school.
9 Classroom teaching in school.
10 Classroom teaching in school.
11 Reflecting on teaching experience
12 Classroom teaching in school.
13 Classroom teaching in school.
14 Teaching styles
15 Issues in learning to teach EFL

Required reading:
– Crookes, G. (2003). A Practicum in TESOL: professional development through teaching practice. Cambridge: CUP.
– Newby, D. et al (2008). European portfolio for student teachers of languages. Graz: ECML. [selected chapters]
– Wajnryb, R. (1992). Classroom observation tasks. Cambridge: CUP. [selected chapters]

Recommended reading:
– Allwright, D. (1988) Observation in the language classroom. New York: Longman. [selected chapters]
– Costas i Costa et al. (eds.) (2001) Student teaching in Europe. Freiburg im Breisgau: Fillibach-Verl.
– Gebhard, J.G. & Oprandy, R. (1999) Language teaching awareness. Cambridge: CUP. [selected chapters]

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