Research in linguistics and translation studies: planning and methodology

Syllabus
Course title:
  Research in linguistics and translation studies: planning and methodology
Course coordinator:  Dr. Nataša Pavlović, Associate Professor, and Dr. Mateusz-Milan Stojanović, Associate Professor
Instructors: Dr. Nataša Pavlović, Associate Professor, and Dr. Mateusz-Milan Stojanović, Associate Professor
ECTS credits:  4
Language:   English and Croatian
Semester:   summer (4th)
Status:  Elective
Form of instruction:  2 contact hours of seminar + e-learning
Examination:  written, continuous assessment

OBJECTIVES:
By the end of the course the students should be able to plan and conduct their own research in the field of linguistics and translation studies, using appropriate methodology. 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
The course deals with the following topics: areas of research, steps in research planning, theoretical models, research questions, formulation and testing of hypotheses related to research questions, relationships among variables, research methods, qualitative and quantitative approaches, data collection and processing, combinations of methods and triangulation of data, analysis and interpretation of data, drawing conclusions, dissemination of findings.

MODE OF INSTRUCTION:
Discussion of particular topics, critical assessment and case analysis, assignments related to particular topics (see Week-by-Week Schedule). The course involves e-learning via http://omega.ffzg.hr/.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND ASSESSMENT:
Regular attendance, preparedness for class, active participation in class and in e-learning, regular submission of assignments.

The final grade is based on continuous assessment of particular course elements (attendance, research, end-of-term paper, active participation in class and in e-learning).

OBLIGATORY READING:
Gačić, Milica. 2012. Pisanje znanstvenih i stručnih radova. Zagreb: Sveučilište u Zagrebu, Učiteljski fakultet, Školska knjiga.

Kumar, Ranjit. 1999. Research Methodology: A Step-by-Step guide for Beginners. London, Thousand Oaks, New Delhi: Sage Publications

ADDITIONAL READING:
Angelelli, C.V. and Baer, B.J. 2016. Researching Translation and Interpreting. London/New York: Routledge.

Saldanha, Gabriela and O’Brien, Sharon. 2013. Research Methodologies in Translation Studies.
London/New York: Routledge.

Williams, Jenny i Chesterman, Andrew. 2002. The Map. A Beginner’s Guide to Doing Research in Translation Studies. Manchester: St Jerome Publishing.

Selected articles accessible via HRČAK; articles and presentations accessible via http://omega.ffzg.hr/.

WEEK-BY-WEEK SCHEDULE:
The course consists of 15 sessions (30 contact hours) over the course of one semester.

Session 1: introduction, presentation of the syllabus and course requirements; areas of research, examples of topics, steps in planning the research, tasks, discussion.

Session 2: discussion of examples, with a particular regard to theoretical models as research background and their relationship with research questions. The issue of validity of particular research questions in various theoretical models. Discussion and tasks.

Session 3: discussion of examples, with a particular regard to the formulation of research questions.

Sessions 4 and 5: discussion of examples, with a particular regard to the formulation and testing of hypotheses related to research questions; relationships among variables. Discussion and tasks.

Sessions 6 and 7: discussion of examples, with a particular regard to various research methods. Quantitative and qualitative approaches. Discussion and tasks.

Sessions 8 and 9: discussion of examples, with a particular regard to data collection and processing (texts and test subjects as sources of data). Combinations of methods and data triangulation. Discussion and tasks.

Session 10: analysis and interpretation of data and drawing of conclusions. Self-reflection.

Session 11: dissemination of findings. Publication of papers and their presentation at conferences. Discussion.

Sessions 12 and 13:  Drafting of research plans in small groups. Discussion and tasks.

Sessions 14 and 15:  Conclusion: presentation of research plans in class. Teacher and peer feedback. Student feedback with regard to the course.