Category Archives: 8. i 10. semestar : KNJIŽEVNI KOLEGIJI

The History and Paradigms of American Studies 2 (Šesnić – 2016)

Course title: The History and Paradigms of American Studies 2 (A, 19th c./20th c.)
Instructor: Dr. Jelena Šesnić
ECTS credits: 6
Status: elective (obligatory for American Studies majors in the 8th semester)
Enrollment requirements: enrollment in the 8th and/or 10th semester

Course description: This course is a companion course to the History and Paradigms of American Studies1 which investigated the origins of the discipline of American Studies. Since the 1970s, however, the discipline undertook to interrogate some of its main premises based on the changing conceptions of U.S. society and the nation-state. Even though the revisionist interventions begin to be felt already in the 1970s, we will posit as a starting point of our inquiry a methodological break observable in the 1980s as „ideology“ becomes a necessary accompaniment of any AS inquiry. The next historical break—the end of the Cold War in 1989—indicates another momentous shift as we follow the developments thereafter. The next point of interest is 9/11 and the way it refocused the work in the discipline. These will demonstrate the efforts by so-called New Americanists to devise contesting models of American culture, while the emphases in their agendas may differ, as our readings will show. In the process of revising American Studies various theories have been made use of, ranging from New Historicism to poststructuralism, to ethnic/ race, feminist and gender studies to Marxism and cultural studies to international/ transnational perspectives. Paralelly, it ought to become evident how each new methodology in the discipline invents, as it were, a new conception of „America“ as its object of study while ur-theories and underlying conceptions in the discipline of AS show great resilience and attest to continuity. The course is obligatory for AS majors.
Course requirements: regular attendance, participation in class discussions, mid-term and final test (continuous assessment), presentation in class, written assignments and a final seminar paper

Syllabus:
Week 1: Laying the ground for (new) American Studies: disciplinary premises and theoretical frameworks (Fluck, L. Marx)
Week 2: Ideology and readings of American artefacts in the 1980s (L. Marx: revision of American pastoralism; Slotkin: revision of the frontier myth)
Week 3: Ideology and readings of American artefacts in the 1980s and beyond: identity approaches (ethnic, race, gender, border, class and religious identities) Tompkins, Morrison
Week 4: Identity approaches (cont.): Lowe, J.D. Saldívar
Week 5: Identity approaches (cont.): Wiegman, Lauter (A short written response.)
Week 6: End of the Cold War and repositionings within the discipline (New Americanists and a new field-imaginary) (Kaplan, Denning)
Week 7: Mid-term test
Week 8: Framing the transnational turn: from national to post-national studies : Armstrong and Tennenhouse, Shapiro, R. Saldívar
Week 9: Framing the transnational turn: imperial, hemispheric and globalist approaches (Walsh, Pease )
Week 10: Post 9/11 and a new state of the discipline: Rowe, Kaplan
Week 11: Post 9/11 and a new state of the discipline: Bayoumi, Enker (A short written response.)
Week 12: Pasts and futures of American Studies: technologies of culture (Lipsitz, Cohen)
Week 13: Pasts and futures of American Studies: post-race (Benn Michaels), class (Lott), religion (Mechling)
Week 14: Pasts and futures of American Studies: space, place and environment (Buell, Dimock) Seminar paper due.
Week 15: Final test; course evaluation.

Readings (expanded list)

-Bercovitch, Sacvan, and Myra Jehlen, eds. Ideology and Classic American Literature. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1986. (selection)
– Castronovo, Russ, and Susan Gillman, eds. States of Emergency: The Object of American Studies. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 2009. (selection)
– Fisher, Phillip. The New American Studies. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1991. (selection)

– Fluck, Winfried, Donald E. Pease, and John Carlos Rowe, eds. Re-Framing the Transnational Turn in American Studies. Hanover, NH: Dartmouth College Press, 2011. (selection)
– Grgas, Stipe. Američki studiji danas: identitet, kapital, spacijalnost. Zagreb: Meandar, 2015. (selection)
-Pease, Donald, and Robyn Wiegman, eds. The Futures of American Studies. Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2002. (selection)
– Radway, Janice A., Kevin K. Gaines, Barry Shank, and Penny Von Eschen. American Studies: An Anthology. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 2009. (selection)

– Rowe, John Carlos The Cultural Politics of the New American Studies. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Library, 2012.Open Humanities Press. http://www.scribd.com/doc/132330117/Rowe-The-Cultural-Politics-of-the-New-American-Studies (selection)

Contemporary Irish Literature and Culture ARCH

Dr. Aidan O’Malley, visiting lecturer
Subject: Modern literature
Course title: Contemporary Irish Literature and Culture
ECTS credits: 6
Language: English
Duration: 1 semester, 8th and 10th
Status: elective
Course type: lectures, seminars

Overview
This course examines a selection of the most important contemporary Irish literary and filmic texts, and frames them in terms of the some of the most significant cultural and political debates that have taken place in the country over the last 30-40 years: the Northern Irish ‘Troubles’, the influence of postcolonial discourse, gender and the position of women writers, the language question, immigration and the recent economic crisis.
With one exception, the novels to be examined are placed at the end of this course in order to allow time for these to be read. Students intending to take this module should immediately acquire and read Flann O’Brien’s novel, The Third Policeman.

Course Requirements

  • 10-15 minute oral presentation
  • Mid-term exam (you are not permitted to answer the question on the text you presented)
  • Final exam (you are not permitted to answer the question on the text you presented)
  • 2,000 word essay based on your presentation. Plagiarism will result in a fail grade.
  • Attendance and participation in class

Course Outline

  1. Introduction to the course
  2. An Outlier: Flann O’Brien, The Third Policeman (1967)
  3. Postcolonial Thinking: Seamus Deane, Civilians and Barbarians (1983); Declan Kiberd, ‘A New England Called Ireland’ (from Inventing Ireland, 1995)
  4. Northern Ireland 1: Frank McGuinness, Observe the Sons of Ulster Marching Towards the Somme (1985)
  5. Northern Ireland 2: Seamus Heaney, selected poems
  6. Northern Ireland 3: Brian Friel, Translations (1980)
  7. Mid-term exam
  8. Irish Women’s Writing 1: Gerardine Meaney, ‘Women and Writing, 1700-1960’, The Field Day Anthology of Irish Writing, Vol. V, pp. 765-71 (2002); Eavan Boland, ‘Outside History’ (in Object Lessons, 1995)
  9. Irish Women’s Writing 2: Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin, selected poems
  10. Irish Women’s Writing 3: Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill, selected poems
  11. Irish film: John Ford, dir., The Quiet Man (1952); Martin McDonagh, dir., In Bruges (2008)
  12. Contemporary Irish Fiction 1: John McGahern, Amongst Women (1990)
  13. Contemporary Irish Fiction 2: Joseph O’Connor, Star of the Sea (2002)
  14. Contemporary Irish Fiction 3: Donal Ryan, The Spinning Heart (2012)

Final Exam

 

 

The History and Paradigms of American Studies 2 (Grgas)

Course title: The History and Paradigms of American Studies 2 (Grgas, 2013-14)
Instructor:
Stipe Grgas
ECTS credits: 6
Status: elective
Enrollment requirements: enrollment in the 8th and/or 10th semester
Course description: This course is a companion course to the course History and Paradigms of American Studies1 which investigated the origins of the discipline of American Studies. Its purpose is to explore the developments within the discipline up to the present day. To generalize, the main development since the founding of the discipline has been the questioning of the holistic approach to the object of study and the essentialist conceptualization of the United States. The latter practitioners of the field have reinscribed into the discipline the voices and experiences of those who were left out of the earlier paradigms and have likewise argued for the contextualization of the United States into the global context. The course will not only review these interventions but will also seek to show how they have been attended by an engagement with different theories, from poststructuralism, gender studies to Marxism.
The course is obligatory for American Studies majors.
Course requirements: regular attendance, participation in class discussions, written assignments and a final seminar paper. At the end of the course the students will be given a written exam.
Sylalbus:
The course will begin by describing how the so-called New Americanists challenged the prevailing methodology and reigning orthodoxies of the so-called „myth and symbol school“. It will be shown how the socio-political realities of the sixties impinged upon the agenda of the discipline and forced it to take cognizance of the heterogeneity of American society and address issues of race, ethnicity, gender, religious affiliation, regional specificity and to a lesser degree class. The second group of themes that the course will take up will deal with the transnational turn in American studies which targets the role the US has played on the global scene excavating the history of American imperialism, the contact zones and borders established throughout this history. The final cluster of issues that the course will take up will attempt to map the present state of the discipline and the way it has attempted to come to an understanding of contemporary American policies, developments within the US and how these have impacted upon our world.
Readings (alternations possible)
– «American Studies at a Crossroad: A Conversation with Donald Pease, Roby Wiegman and John Smelcer» http://ragazine.cc/2011/12/discourse-american-studies/
– Bronner, Simon J. «American Studies: A Discipline». Encyclopedia of American Studies, ed. Simon J. Bronner (Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press, 2012), s.v. „American Studies: a Discipline“ (by Simon J. Brooner), http://eas-ref.press.jhu.edu/view?aid=809 (accessed August 17, 2012).
– Castronovo, Russ and Susan Gillman 2009. States of Emergency: The Object of American Studies. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press. pp. 1-54.
– Denning, Michael 1986. „’The Special American Conditions’: Marxism and American Studies“, American Quarterly, vol.38.no.3 (1986): 356-380.
– Fisher, Phillip 1991. The New American Studies. Berkeley: University of California Press.
– Grgas, Stipe 2013. „American Studies and the Canonization of Thomas Pynchon“. journal-borderlands . serbianamericanstudies.rs
– Radway, Janice A., Kevin K. Gaines, Barry Shank and Penny Von Eschen 2009. American Studies: An Anthology. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell. (selection)
– Rowe, John Carlos 2012. The Cultural Politics of the New American Studies. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Library. Open Humanities Press. http://www.scribd.com/doc/132330117/Rowe-The-Cultural-Politics-of-the-New-American-Studies
– Shapiro, Stephen 2001. „Reconfiguring American Studies?: The Paradoxes of Postnationalism“. 49th Parallel: An Interdisciplinary Journal of North American Studies. Issue 8/ Summer 2001.

In addition to these theoretical texts the course will understake a reading of Thomas Pynchon’s novel Vineland focusing upon the issue how the author in this text prefigures the present moment of the United States.

 

The History and Paradigms of American Studies 2 (Šesnić, 2012)

Dr Jelena Šesnić

Literary Seminar (MA Level): The History and Paradigms of American Studies 2

Spring 2012


Syllabus
Course description:
This is a companion course to the History and Paradigms of American Studies 1 which thus continues to examine the changes in the methodology of American Studies since the 1970s. Major developments in this respect are poststructuralist theory, new historicism, feminist and gender studies (from Marxism to psychoanalysis), ethnic, postcolonial and border studies, transnational turn and cultural studies. These approaches will be exemplified by representative scholarly essays and tested in turn on the appropriate primary texts. The course is obligatory for American studies majors (8th semester); elective for all other MA students.

 

Course requirements: regular attendance; participation in class discussion; in-class and home assignments; oral presentation (10 min); 2 seminar papers (6-7 pp./ ca 2000-2500 words each + bibliography); final test (mandatory, non-negotiable, continuous assessment). Grade break-down: Seminar papers 50 %; final test 30 %; the rest 20 %.

 

Readings (alterations possible):

 

Primary texts

1. Thomas Jefferson: Notes on the State of Virginia (1781-2; selected chapters)

http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/toc/modeng/public/JefVirg.html

(E-text centre, U of Virginia Library)

2. Lenora Sansay: Secret History, or The Horrors of St. Domingo (1808)

3. Edgar Allan Poe: The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket (1838)

http://xroads.virginia.edu/~MA98/silverman/poe/frame.html

(American Studies at the UVa)

4. Henry David Thoreau: Walden (1845; selected chapters)

http://www.vcu.edu/engweb/transcendentalism/authors/thoreau/walden/index.html

(American Transcendentalism on the Web)

5. Herman Melville: „Benito Cereno“ (from The Piazza Tales, 1856)

http://www.esp.org/books/melville/piazza/contents/cereno.html

6. Harriet Prescott Spofford: „Amber Gods“ (1863)

http://faculty.pittstate.edu/~knichols/beads.html

7. Sandra Cisneros: „Woman Hollering Creek“ (1991)


Syllabus (alterations possible)

 

March

Week 1: Introduction: European vs US Americanists; perspectives, focus and methods:

Chenetier, Fluck, Pease

Week 2: from national to imperial American studies (Aravamudan)

Week 3: Poststructuralism: Thoreau, Walden (Benn Michaels)

Week 4: Thoreau, Walden; towards New Historicism (Michael Gilmore)

April

Week 1: New Historicism: text and contexts; Bercovitch and the American Renaissance

Week 2: New Historicism and the “New Americanists”: EA Poe: Pym (D. Pease)

Week 3: New Historicism: EA Poe, cont.

Week 4: New Historicism into transnational American studies: Herman Melville: “Benito Cereno” (Sundquist, Warren)

Week 5: De-centring American studies: ethnic studies; Jefferson, Notes (Erkkila)

May

Week 1: Jefferson, Notes (cont.)

Week 2: Feminist criticism and the canon: Baym; Harriet Prescott Spofford: “Amber Gods”

Week 3: Feminist into gender studies; border studies: Anzaldúa; Cisneros

Week 4: Is there a transnational American studies? Leonora Sansay: Secret History, or The Horrors of St. Domingo

June

Week 1: Transnational American studies: Sansay, cont.

Week 2: American Studies and cultural studies: is there a method? Guest lecturer: Dr. Sven Cvek (American Studies Program, Zagreb)

Final test.

 

Relevant Internet sources:

EAAS web-site (European Association for American Studies): see links

ASA web-site (American Studies Association): see links

ALA (American Literature Association): see links

MLA (Modern Languages Association): see links

MELUS (US-based) and MESEA (European-based): see links

American Studies Journals on the Web

Full-text journal databases: J-stor, Project Muse, EBSCO, Oxford Journals, Blackwell, etc.

 

List of journals:

American Literary History; American Quarterly (ASA); American Literature (ALA)

PMLA (MLA)

European Journal of American Studies (e-journal, EAAS; see other national AS associations)

New Literary History; Boundary 2; Representations

MELUS

The Transnational Journal of American Studies (e-journal)

The 49th Parallel (e-journal)

Neo-Americanist (e-journal)

Topics in American Studies 2: American Non-Fiction Writing, 1580-1880

Course title: Topics in American Studies 2: American Non-Fiction Writing, 1580-1880
Instructor:
Prof. Douglas Ambrose (Fulbright Scholar)

ECTS credits: 6
Status: Elective
Language: English
Semester: 8th
Enrolment requirements: enrolment in the 8th semester

COURSE PURPOSE: This course provides an introduction to American history through various forms of non-fiction writing.  Beginning with sixteenth-century English accounts of the New World, we will explore the development of certain themes and genres that came to characterize American non-fiction, including the jeremiad, the captivity narrative, social and physical mobility, “manifest destiny” and providentialism, the slave narrative, nature writing, and the promise of “the west.”  We will follow a chronological narrative through American history, recognizing throughout the political and social contexts of the texts while paying close attention to the internal development of the genres to which they belong. 

COURSE STRUCTURE:  Students must complete the readings for the week prior to our Monday meetings.  Each Monday meeting will begin with a brief quiz on that week’s materials.  Each student must bring the week’s readings to class each week.  Although I will occasionally lecture in order to situate the texts, class discussion of the readings will constitute the bulk of our meetings.  A successful class requires the participation of all students.  Attendance, therefore, counts.  Students may miss two classes without penalty. 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  In addition to regular attendance, preparation, and participation, students will write four short papers (500-750 words each) and one longer paper (2500 words).  Beginning with Week 2 and continuing for every subsequent week through week 14, I will provide a question at the conclusion of Tuesday’s meeting.  Students will pick four of these questions to write on.  Papers are always due the following Monday.  I will not accept any late papers, so choose wisely.  For the final paper, the student will choose one of the genres we will focus on, read at least two secondary sources on and two additional primary sources from that genre, and write a paper that examines the historical and literary meanings of those texts. Final papers are due not later than 16:00 on 14 June.

Course schedule:
Week 1: Envisioning America.  Read Thomas Harriot, A Brief and True Report of the New Found Land of Virginia (1588/1590).
Week 2: Planting a “New England.” John Cotton, “God’s Promise to His Plantation” (1630); John Winthrop, “Model of Christian Charity” (1630).
Week 3: Exhorting America: The Jeremiad and its Meanings.  Read Samuel Danforth, New England’s Errand into the Wilderness (1670); Increase Mather, An Exhortation To the Inhabitants of New England (1676).
Week 4: Captivity, Identity, and Redemption.  Read Mary Rowlandson, The Sovereignty and Goodness of God (1682).
Week 5: The Beginnings of “American” History.  Read Cotton Mather, Magnalia Christi Americana (1702); Robert Beverly, The History and Present State of Virginia (1705).
Week 6: Becoming American.  Read Benjamin Franklin, Autobiography (1791).
Week 7: The Transformation of Political Discourse.  Read Thomas Paine, Common Sense (1776); Samuel Sherwood, “The Church’s Flight into the Wilderness” (1776).
Week 8: Explaining America. Hector St. John de Crevecour, Letters From an American Farmer (1782): Read “Advertisement and Dedication,” Letter I, Letter III, and Letter IX; Thomas Jefferson, Notes on the State of Virginia (1787): Read “Front Matter,” Query 8, Query 11, Query 14, and Query 17.
Week 9: Exploring America.  For William Bartram, Travels (1791), read Part IV, Chapters  I-VI; For Lewis and Clark, Journals (1814), read July 30, 1804; August 25, 1804; September 24 & 25, 1804; October 8, 9, 10, 11, & 12, 1804; October 27, 1804; October 29, 1804; October 31, 1804; November 4, 1804.
Week 10: Creating an American Identity.  Read Noah Webster, “On the Education of Youth in America” (1788); Fisher Ames, “American Literature” (1803), on Omega.
Week 11: American Destiny.  Read Lyman Beecher, A Plea for the West (1832); John L. O’Sullivan, “The Great Nation of Futurity” (1839).
Week 12: The Beginnings of African American Political Writing. Read David Walker, Appeal to the Coloured Citizens of the World.
Week 13: Narrating American Slavery and American Freedom. Read William Wells Brown, Narrative of William Wells Brown, A Fugitive Slave (1847); Josiah Henson, The Life of Josiah Henson . . . (1849).
Week 14: The “Other America”: The South. Read James Henley Thornwell, “The Christian Doctrine of Slavery” (1850); Louisa McCord, “Woman and Her Needs” (1852); George Fitzhugh, “Southern Thought” (1857), on Omega.
Week 15: A New Birth: Postbellum America. Read Lincoln, “Second Inaugural Address” (1865); Horace Bushnell, “Our Obligations to the Dead” (1865) on Omega; Frederick Douglass, “What the Black Man Wants” (1865); and “Oration in Memory of Abraham Lincoln” (1876)

 

Cultural Aspects of American Neoliberalism

Course title: Cultural Aspects of American Neoliberalism
Instructor: Asst. Prof. Sven Cvek
ECTS credits: 6
Status: elective
Semester: 2nd or 4th
Enrollment requirements: enrollment in the graduate program
Course description: Starting from the assumption about the inseparability of the economic, political, and cultural spheres, the course offers an overview of the main social processes related to the emergence and development of US neoliberalism. The course covers the historical period between two economic crises, 1973 and 2008, and follows the cultural articulations of the gradual undoing of the legacy of the New Deal and the parallel rise of the ideas of the Chicago school of economics. Neoliberalism is considered in relation to: liberalism, neoconservativism, the problematic of space, democratic politics, work, and moments of crisis. These topics are studies by relying predominantly, but not exclusively, on works of fiction and film.
Objectives: acquiring knowledge about the development neoliberal ideas and practices; critical approach to social-historica processes; introduction to relevant literature.
Course requirements: regular attendance, written tests, essay paper.

Reading:
Primary:
(selection):
Jonathan Franzen, The 27th City
Bonnie Jo Campbell, The American Salvage
Don DeLillo, Cosmopolis
Po Bronson, Bombardiers

selection of films and series:
Harlan County U.S.A. (Barbara Kopple, 1976)
Blue Collar (Paul Schrader, 1978)
Roger and Me (Michael Moore, 1989)
Wall Street (Oliver Stone, 1987)
Bob Roberts (Tim Robbins, 1992)
Office Space (Mike Judge, 1999)
The Wire (David Simon, 2002-08)
When the Levees Broke: A Requiem in Four Acts (Spike Lee, 2006)
Generation Kill (Ed Burns, David Simon, Evan Wright, 2008)
Sleep Dealer (Alex Rivera, 2008)
Frozen River (Courtney Hunt, 2008)
Winter’s Bone (Debra Granik, 2010)
Take Shelter (Jeff Nichols, 2011)
Margin Call (J.C. Chandor, 2011)
In Time (Andrew Niccol, 2011)
Beasts of the Southern Wild (Benh Zeitlin, 2012)
The Big Short (Adam McKay, 2015)
UnREAL (Marti Noxon, Sarah Gertrude Shapiro, 2015)

Secondary:
– Nikhil Pal Singh, “Liberalism,” In Keywords for American Cultural Studies, ed. Bruce Burgett and Glenn Hendler, New York and London: NYU Press, 2007: 139-44.

– Michel Foucault, The Birth of Biopolitics: Lectures at the Collège de France, 1978-1979. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2008. (selection)
– David Harvey, A Brief History of Neoliberalism, Oxford & New York: Oxford UP, 2007. (selection)
– Jane L. Collins, Micaela di Leonardo and Brett Williams, ed. New Landscapes of Inequality: Neoliberalism and the Erosion of Democracy in America, Santa Fe: School for Advanced Research Press, 2008. (selection)
– Wendy Brown, “American Nightmare: Neoliberalism, Neoconservatism, and De-Democratization,” Political Theory, Vol. 34, No. 6 (Dec., 2006), pp. 690-714.
– Jodi Melamed, “The Spirit of Neoliberalism: From Racial Liberalism to Neoliberal Multiculturalism,” Social Text, 89, Vol. 24, No. 4, Winter 2006.

Further reading:
– Milton Friedman, Capitalism and Freedom. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1982 (1962).
– Naomi Klein, The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism. New York: Metropolitan Books, 2007. (selection).
– Paul Krugman, “For Richer,” The New York Times, October 20, 2002.
– Lisa Duggan, The Twilight of Equality? Neoliberalism, Cultural Politics, and the Attack on Democracy. Boston: Beacon Press, 2003. (selection).
– Thomas Frank, What’s the Matter with Kansas? How Conservatives Won the Heart of America. New York: Henry Holt and Company, 2005. (selection).

American Gothic

Graduate Elective
American Gothic
University of Zagreb
Spring 2012,
8th and 10th semester
Prof. Charles L. Crow

charleslcrow@yahoo.com

Thursday 2:00-2:45, A-123
Friday 11:00-12:30, A-105

“Who knows what evil lurks in the hearts of men? The Shadow knows.”
The Shadow — old time radio show

Course requirements: regular attendance and participation in discussion. A paper of about 12 pages, written as a conference paper. Final examination.
Note 1: The syllabus below may be modified as the pace and needs of the class indicate.
Note 2: Most readings can be found on-line. In a few cases I will provide texts that may be duplicated.

Week 1: 8-9 March.
Introduction to the Gothic.
Cotton Mather, Trials of Martha Carrier and G. B., “A Notable Exploit; Wherein, Dux FaeminaFacti” [The Narrative of Hannah Dustan].
Nathaniel Hawthorne, “Alice Doan’s Appeal”

Week 2: 15-16 March
Loomings
“Abraham Panther,” “A Surprising Account of the Discovery of a Lady “
J. Hector St. John de Crèvecoeur, from Letters from an American Farmer, Letter IX
Charles Brockden Brown, “Somnambulism”
John Neal, “Idiosyncrasies”
Washington Irving, “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow”

Week 3: 22-23 March
The Dark Romantics I
Nathaniel Hawthorne, “Young Goodman Brown”
Herman Melville, “Hawthorne and His Mosses,” “The Bell Tower,” BenitoCereno.

Week 4: 29-30 March
The Dark Romantics II (Poe Festival)
“Hop-Frog,” “The Cask of Amontillado,””The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar,” “The Fall of the House of Usher,” “The Raven,” “The City in the Sea,” “Ulalume,” “Annabel Lee,” “Dream-Land.”

Week 5: 5-6 April
Retrospective New England Gothic
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, “The Skeleton in Armor.”
Harriet Prescott Spofford, “Circumstance.”

(April 6 is Good Friday)

Week 6: 12-13 April
Gothic Women I
Louisa May Alcott, “A Whisper in the Dark”
Emily Dickinson, “Through lane it lay – through bramble,” “I felt a Funeral, in my Brain,””‘Tis so appalling – it exhilarates”, “The Soul Has Bandaged Moments,
“”One need not be a Chamber – to be Haunted,” “‘Twas like a Maelstrom, with a notch,””If I may have it, when it’s dead,” “What mystery pervades a well!”

Week 7: 19-20 April
Gothic of Race
Folk tale, “Talking Bones”
Charles Chesnutt, “The Sheriff’s Children,” “The Dumb Witness,” “The Marked Tree.”
Paul Laurence Dunbar, “The Lynching of Jube Benson”
Alice Dunbar Nelson, “Sister Josepha”
Grace King, “The Little Convent Girl”

Week 8: 26-27 April
Some haunted houses:
Madeline Yale Wynne, “The Little Room”
Elia Wilkinson Peattie, “The House that Was Not”
Henry James, The Turn of the Screw

Week 9: 3-4 May

Some weird tales:
Edith Wharton, “The Eyes”
Ambrose Bierce, “An Inhabitant of Carcosa,” “The Death of HalpinFrayser.”
Robert W. Chambers, “In the Court of the Dragon.”
H. P. Lovecraft, “The Stranger”

Week 10: 10-11 May.

Gothic of the village:
Stephen Crane, “The Monster”
Poems by E. A. Robinson,:””LukeHavergal”, “Lisette and Eileen,””The Dark House.” “The Mill,” “Souvenir,” “Why He Was There.”
Shirley Jackson, “The Lottery.”

Week 11: 17-18 May.

Gothic Women II
Kate Chopin, “Désireé’s Baby,”
Mary E. Wilkins Freeman, “Luella Miller,” “Old Woman Magoun”
Charlotte Perkins Gilman, “The Yellow Wall Paper”
William Faulkner, “A Rose for Emily’

Week 12: 24-25 May.Modern and contemporary works, chosen by the class.

Week 13: 31 May-1 June.Modern and contemporary works, chosen by the class.

Week 14: 8 June (June 7 is Corpus Christi day)

Discuss John Sayles’s film, Lone Star.

Continue reading

Theory and History of the Novel in English

Course title:  Theory and History of the Novel in English
Instructor: Prof. Borislav Knežević
ECTS credits: 6
Status: elective
Semester: 2nd  and 4th
Enrollment requirements:  Enrollment in the graduate programme

Course description: This course is meant to provide an introduction to the history and theory of the novel in English.  Our reading will include novels ranging from the period of the emergence of the novel as a genre at the beginning of the 18th century to the postmodern period of the late 20th century.  In reading and discussing a substantial amount of secondary literature, focusing on issues of periodization, narrative, genre, and the social context.
Objectives: The course is designed to facilitate active student engagement with issues in literary interpretation and history, as well as to create a structured theoretical context for analytical writing on literary subjects.
Course requirements: The grade is based on a written essay at the end of term (5-6) pages, a mid-term quiz and a quiz at the end of term. 

Week by week schedule:
1. week: Introduction.  Beginnings of the genre. Definition of the novel.  Ian Watt.

2. week: Robinson Crusoe.  McKeon.
3. week: Mansfield Park.  Stone.  Morretti.
4. week: Mansfield Park.  Armstrong.
5. week: Lukacs.
6. week: To the Lighthouse.  Woolf. Chatman.
7. week: Mid-term quiz.
8. week: To the Lighthouse.
9. week: The Crying of Lot 49.
10. week: The Crying of Lot 49. Bakhtin. Jameson.

11. week: Essay due
12. week: Song of Solomon.
13. week: Song of Solomon.

14. week: Second quiz. Song of Solomon.
15. week: Course summary.

Reading:

Novels
Daniel Defoe, Robinson Crusoe
Jane Austen, Mansfield Park
Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse
Thomas Pynchon, The Crying of Lot 49
Toni Morrison, Song of Solomon

Criticism
Mikhail Bakhtin, from The Dialogic Imagination
Michael McKeon, from The Origins of the Novel
Georg Lukacs, from Theory of the Novel
Franco Moretti, from Atlas of the European Novel
Nancy Armstrong, from Desire and Domestic Fiction
Lawrence Stone, from The Family, Sex and Marriage
Ian Watt, from The Rise of the Novel
E.M. Forster, from Aspects of the Novel
Seymour Chatman, from Story and Discourse
Fredric Jameson, from Postmodernism

Virginia Woolf, “Modern Fiction”
Henry James, “The Art of Fiction”
Viktor Shklovsky, “Sterne’s Tristram Shandy”

F.R. Leavis, from The Great Tradition

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The History and Paradigms of American Studies 2 (Šesnić, 2013)

Course title: The History and Paradigms of American Studies 2
Instructor: Dr Jelena Šesnić
ECTS credits: 6
Status: elective
Semester: 8th and 9th semester, Spring 2013
Enrollment requirements: enrollment in the 8th and/or 10th semester
Course description: This is a companion course to the History and Paradigms of American Studies 1 which thus continues to examine the changes in the methodology of American Studies since the 1970s. Major developments in this respect are poststructuralist theory, new historicism, feminist and gender studies (from Marxism to psychoanalysis), ethnic, postcolonial and border studies, transnational turn and cultural studies. These approaches will be exemplified by representative scholarly essays and tested in turn on the appropriate primary texts. The course is obligatory for American studies majors (8th semester); elective for all other MA students.
Course requirements: regular attendance; participation in class discussion; in-class and home assignments (two research projects/ reviews); oral presentation (10 min); 2 seminar papers (6-7 pp. each/ 2000-2500 words); final test (mandatory, non-negotiable, continuous assessment). Grade break-down: seminar papers 40 %; final test 30 %; written assignments 20%; the rest 10 %.

Readings (alterations possible):
Primary texts
1. Thomas Jefferson: Notes on the State of Virginia (1781-2; selected chapters)
http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/toc/modeng/public/JefVirg.html
(E-text centre, U of Virginia Library)

2. Lenora Sansay: Secret History, or The Horrors of St. Domingo (1808)

3. Edgar Allan Poe: The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket (1838)
http://xroads.virginia.edu/~MA98/silverman/poe/frame.html
(American Studies at the UVa)

4. Henry David Thoreau: Walden (1845; selected chapters)
http://www.vcu.edu/engweb/transcendentalism/authors/thoreau/walden/index.html
(American Transcendentalism on the Web)

5. Herman Melville: „Benito Cereno“ (from The Piazza Tales, 1856)
http://www.esp.org/books/melville/piazza/contents/cereno.html

6. Charlotte Perkins Stetson Gilman: „The Yellow Wall-Paper“ (1892)
http://ebooks.library.cornell.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=newe;cc=newe;view=toc;subview=short;idno=newe0011-5
(Cornell University Library Making of America Collection)

7. Chicano/ borderlands literary production: selection (Gloria Anzaldúa, Sandra Cisneros)

Syllabus (alterations possible)
March
Week 1: Introduction: European vs US Americanists; perspectives, focus and methods:
Chenetier, Fluck, Shapiro; Jefferson, Notes (introduction)
Week 2: Centring and de-centring American studies: Jefferson, Notes; Erkkila
Week 3: Whiteness studies (CEEPUS guest lecturer)
Week 4: Thoreau, Walden (Buell, ecocriticism and de-exceptionalizing Walden)

April
Week 1: Thoreau, Walden (cont.)
Week 2: E.A. Poe, Pym and ethnic/ race studies; Morrison
Week 3: E.A. Poe, cont.
Week 4: New Historicism into transnational American studies: Herman Melville: “Benito Cereno” (Sundquist, Stuckey)
Week 5: Melville, cont.

May
Week 1: Transnational AS: Leonora Sansay: Secret History, or The Horrors of St. Domingo
Week 2: Sansay, cont.
Week 3: Border studies: Anzaldúa; borderlands (Chicano) literary production (Cisneros) (CEEPUS guest lecturer)
Week 4: Feminist criticism and the canon: Baym; Perkins Gilman: “The Yellow Wall-Paper”

June
Week 1: American Studies and cultural studies: is there a method? Guest lecturer: Dr. Sven Cvek (American Studies Program, Zagreb)
Week 2: Final test.

 

The United States Now

Course title: The United States Now
Instructor
: Prof. Stipe Grgas

ECTS credits: 6
Status:
elective

Semester: 2 and 4
Enrollment requirements:
enrollment in the graduate program
Course description:
The course will explore the main issues and topics which characterize the present moment of United States reality. The departure point for the course is the contention that the time frame within which the “present” is defined was inaugurated by September 11 and the subsequent actions taken by the United States government, subsequent domestic developments and the effects these had on self-projections and representations of the United States. The second event which is believed to have inaugurated a new phase in United States history is the current financial crisis. The course will explore the nature of this crisis and how it has made it imperative to question some of the basic assumptions of United States identity.

Objectives: The methodological objective of the course is to show how an interdisciplinary approach can be used to explore a historical conjecture. Overall the purpose of the course is to give a thick description of the present reality of the United States.

Course requirements: attendance, participation in the course, oral presentations, a written paper and a final written exam

Week by week schedule: the present moment, the meaning of the event (September 11/financial crisis), terrorism, imperialism, corporate power, religion, war, financialization, technology, production of American spaces, the question of the persuasiveness of American myths, literature and American Studies in the moment of danger.

Reading: In addition to a selection of texts dealing with the present moment the students will be asked to follow and keep track of news items from the States. The lecturer will give them a list of internet sites that reflect various viewpoints and opinions. In addition the participants in the course are expected to read Richard Powers’ novel Gain and a selection from Against the Day by Thomas Pynchon.