Category Archives: 8. i 10. semestar : KNJIŽEVNI KOLEGIJI

The History and Paradigms of American Studies 2 (Šesnić, 2019)

Course title: The History and Paradigms of American Studies 2 (A, 19th c./20th c.)
Instructor: Dr. Jelena Šesnić
ECTS credits: 6
Status: elective (obligatory for American Studies majors in the 2nd semester)
Enrollment requirements: enrollment in the 2nd and/or 4th semester

Course description: This course is a companion course to the History and Paradigms of American Studies1 which investigates the origins of the discipline of American Studies. Since the 1970s, however, the discipline has undertaken to interrogate some of its main premises based on the changing conceptions of U.S. society and the nation-state. Even though the revisionist interventions began to be felt already in the 1970s, we will posit as a starting point of our inquiry a methodological break observable in the 1980s as “ideology” becomes a necessary accompaniment of any AS inquiry. The next historical break—the end of the Cold War in 1989—indicates another momentous shift as we follow the developments thereafter. These will demonstrate the efforts by so-called New Americanists to devise contesting models of American culture, while the emphases in their agendas may differ, as our readings will show. In the process of revising American Studies various theories have been made use of, ranging from New Historicism to poststructuralism, to ethnic/ race, feminist and gender studies to Marxism and cultural studies to transnational perspectives. In the process it becomes evident how each new methodology in the discipline invents, as it were, a new conception of “America” as its object of study while ur-theories and underlying conceptions in the discipline of AS show great resilience and attest to the discipline’s continuity. In the last part of the course the foregoing theories will be tested on an array of texts. The course is obligatory for AS majors and elective for other English MA students.

Course requirements: regular attendance, participation in class discussions, mid-term and final test (continuous assessment), presentation in class, written assignments and a final seminar paper

Syllabus (alterations possible):

Primary works:

1. Henry David Thoreau: Walden (1854). Multiple copies in the library; begin reading from session one.
2. Joel and Ethan Coen: True Grit (film; 2010)
3. Bruce Springsteen: selection
4. Benjamin Franklin’s Autobiography (1790?). Available in the library; start reading early.

February/ March

Week 1: Laying the ground for (new) American Studies: disciplinary premises and theoretical frameworks (Castiglia: from The Practices of Hope). Begin reading Walden.

Week 2: Castiglia: cont. Ideology and readings of American artefacts in the 1980s and beyond: H. D. Thoreau: Walden (1854). Exemplary approaches to Walden: 1. Michael Gilmore: “Walden and the ‘Curse of Trade’”

Week 3: Gilmore: cont. Exemplary approaches to Walden: 2. Lawrence Buell: “Walden’s Environmental Projects”

Week 4: Exemplary approaches to Walden: 3. Stanley Cavell: from The Senses of Walden. Individual project 1.

Week 5: Ideology and readings of American artefacts: revision of the frontier myth: Joel and Ethan Coen: True Grit (2010). 1. Richard Slotkin: from Gunfighter Nation.

April

Week 6: CEEPUS guest lecturer: Professor Reka Cristian (University of Szeged). Topic: tba.

Week 7: Revisions of the frontier myth: 2. Patricia N. Limerick: from Something in the Soil; Neil Campbell, from Post-Westerns: Cinema, Region, West.

Week 8: Ideology and readings of American artefacts: identity approaches (race, ethnicity, gender, class and religious identities): African American studies. Mid-term test.

Week 9: CEEPUS guest lecturer: Professor Aleksandra Izgarjan (University of Novi Sad). Topic: tba.

Week 10: Chicano and Latino studies. Individual project 2.

May

Week 11: Asian American studies.

Week 12: Case study 1: Bruce Springsteen: masculinity, religion, ethnicity, nationalism. Selection from Womack et al., ed., Bruce Springsteen, Cultural Studies, and the Runaway American Dream

Week 13: Case study 2: Charles Murray, from Coming Apart: The State of White America, 1960-2010

Week 14: Case study 3: Benjamin Franklin’s Autobiography (1791, 1793; Shapiro). Seminar paper deadline.

June

Week 15: Benjanim Franklin, cont. Castronovo: “Benjamin Franklin and Wiki Leaks.” Final test. Course evaluation.

Additional reading

– Bercovitch, Sacvan, and Myra Jehlen, eds. Ideology and Classic American Literature. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1986.

– Buell, Lawrence. The Environmental Imagination: Thoreau, Nature Writing, and the Formation of American Culture. Cambridge and London: The Belknap P of Harvard UP, 1995.

– Campbell, Neil. Post-Westerns: Cinema, Region, West. Lincoln and London: U of Nebraska P, 2013.

– Castiglia, Christopher. The Practices of Hope: Literary Criticism in Disenchanted Times. New York: New York UP, 2017.

– Cavell, Stanley. The Senses of Walden. An expanded ed. Chicago and London: The U Chicago P, 1992.

– Limerick, Patricia Nelson. Something in the Soil: Legacies and Reckonings in the New West. New York, London: W.W. Norton, 2000.

– Murray, Charles. Coming Apart: The State of White America, 1960-2000. New York: Crown Forum, 2012.

– Rowe, John Carlos, ed. A Concise Companion to American Studies. Malden, Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2010.

– Shapiro, Stephen. The Culture and Commerce of the Early American Novel: Reading the Atlantic World System. University Park: The Pennsylvania State UP, 2008.

– Slotkin, Richard. Gunfighter Nation: The Myth of the Frontier in Twentieth-Century America. Norman: U of Oklahoma P, 1992.

– Womack, Kenneth, Jerry Zolten, and Mark Bernhard, eds. Bruce Springsteen, Cultural Studies, and the Runaway American Dream. Farnham, Brulington: Ashgate, 2012.

A course reader with assigned readings will be provided on Omega.

 

 

The History and Paradigms of American Studies 2 (Šesnić, 2018)(arch.)

Course title: The History and Paradigms of American Studies 2 (A, 19th c./20th c.)
Instructor: Dr. Jelena Šesnić
ECTS credits: 6
Status: elective (obligatory for American Studies majors in the 2nd semester)
Enrollment requirements: enrollment in the 2nd and/or 4th semester

Course description: This course is a companion course to the History and Paradigms of American Studies1 which investigates the origins of the discipline of American Studies. Since the 1970s, however, the discipline has undertaken to interrogate some of its main premises based on the changing conceptions of U.S. society and the nation-state. Even though the revisionist interventions begin to be felt already in the 1970s, we will posit as a starting point of our inquiry a methodological break observable in the 1980s as “ideology” becomes a necessary accompaniment of any AS inquiry. The next historical break—the end of the Cold War in 1989—indicates another momentous shift as we follow the developments thereafter. The next point of interest is 9/11 and the way it refocused the work in the discipline. These will demonstrate the efforts by so-called New Americanists to devise contesting models of American culture, while the emphases in their agendas may differ, as our readings will show. In the process of revising American Studies various theories have been made use of, ranging from New Historicism to poststructuralism, to ethnic/ race, feminist and gender studies to Marxism and cultural studies to transnational perspectives. In the process it becomes evident how each new methodology in the discipline invents, as it were, a new conception of “America” as its object of study while ur-theories and underlying conceptions in the discipline of AS show great resilience and attest to continuity. In the last part of the course the foregoing theories will be tested on an array of texts. The course is obligatory for AS majors and elective for other English MA students.
Course requirements: regular attendance, participation in class discussions, mid-term and final test (continuous assessment), presentation in class, written assignments and a final seminar paper

Syllabus (alterations possible):

Week 1: Laying the ground for (new) American Studies: disciplinary premises and theoretical frameworks (Fluck, L. Marx, Pease, Spanos)

Week 2: Ideology and readings of American artefacts in the 1980s and beyond: L. Marx, revision of American pastoralism)

Week 3: Ideology and readings of American artefacts: R. Slotkin, revision of the frontier myth

Week 4: Ideology and readings of American artefacts: S. Bercovitch, revision of the Puritan hypothesis; Spanos

Week 5: Ideology and readings of American artefacts: identity approaches (race, ethnicity, gender, class and religious identities): ethnic studies and American studies (G. Lipsitz; T. Chakkalakal; P. Chu)

Week 6: Identity approaches: class and American studies (M. Denning; W. Fluck)

Week 7: Identity approaches: religion and American studies (J. Mechling; K. Lofton)

Week 8: Mid-term test.

Week 9: Identity approaches: gender and American studies (Sh. Samuels)

Week 10: Post 9/11 and a new state of the discipline: J. C. Rowe; D. Watson

Week 11: Contemporary America: politics, society, the economy: Love Guv series

Week 12: Case study 1: Benjamin Franklin’s Autobiography (1791, 1793; Shapiro)

Week 13: Case study 2: Lin-Manuel Miranda: Hamilton (musical, 2015) (The Federalist Papers, 1787/88; Ambrose)

Week 14: Case study 3: C. L. R. James: Mariners, Renegades and Castaways: The Story of Herman Melville and the World We Live In (excerpts) (Pease)

Week 15: Final test. Course evaluation.

Readings (selection)

– Bercovitch, Sacvan, and Myra Jehlen, eds. Ideology and Classic American Literature. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1986. (selection)

– Grgas, Stipe. Američki studiji danas: identitet, kapital, spacijalnost. Zagreb: Meandar, 2015. (selection)

– Fluck, Winfried, Donald E. Pease, and John Carlos Rowe, eds. Re-Framing the Transnational Turn in American Studies. Hanover, NH: Dartmouth College Press, 2011. (selection)

– Levander, Caroline and Robert S. Levine, eds. A Companion to American Literary Studies. Malden, Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2011. (selection)

-Pease, Donald, and Robyn Wiegman, eds. The Futures of American Studies. Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2002. (selection)

– Rowe, John Carlos, ed. A Concise Companion to American Studies. Malden, Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2010. (selection)

– Rowe, John Carlos. The Cultural Politics of the New American Studies. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Library, 2012.Open Humanities Press. http://www.scribd.com/doc/132330117/Rowe-The-Cultural-Politics-of-the-New-American-Studies (selection)

– Shu, Yuan, and Donald E. Pease, eds. American Studies as Transnational Practice: Turning towards the Transpacific. Hanover, NH: Dartmouth College P, 2015.

A course reader with assigned readings will be provided on Omega.

 

 

Ethics and Aesthetics of British Modernism

Course title: Ethics and Aesthetics of British Modernism
Instructor: Martina Domines Veliki, PhD
ECTS credits: 6
Language: English
Duration: 2nd or 4th semester
Status: elective
Course type: 1 hour of lecture, 2 hours of seminar
Prerequisites: completed undergraduate studies
Course description: The course deals with trauma theory the New Poverty Studies in order to address the issue of modernist subjectivity in a wider socio-political context after the First World War.
Course requirements: continuous assessment (midterm and final exam, final paper, class attendance and participation).

Weekly schedule:
Week 1: socio-historical context, 1930s in England
Week 2: First World War and war trauma
Week 3: Mrs. Dalloway (1925)
Week 4: Mrs. Dalloway continued
Week 5: Robert Graves, Siegfried Sassoon, Wilfred Owen (selections of poetry)
Week 6: Goodbye To All That (1929)
 Week 7: Mid-term exam
Week 8: New Poverty Studies, introduction
Week 9: Sons and Lovers (1931)
Week 10: Sons and Lovers continued
Week 11: Down and Out in Paris and London (1933)
Week 12: Down and Out continued
Week 13: Pygmalion (1913)
Week 14: final remarks
Week 15: End-term exam, seminar paper


Reading list:
Primary literature:
Virginia Woolf (1925) Mrs. Dalloway
Robert Graves, Siegfried Sassoon and Wilfred Owen – selections of poetry
Robert Graves (1929) Goodbye To All That
D.H. Lawrence (1931) Sons and Lovers
George Orwell (1933) Down and Out in Paris and London
George Bernard Shaw (1913) Pygmalion

Secondary literature:
Caruth, Cathy (ed.)
Trauma – Explorations in Memory (Baltimore and London: The Johns Hopkins UP, 1995)
Childs, Peter. Modernism (London and New York: Routledge, 2000)
Clarke, J., C. Critcher and R. Johnson. Working-Class Culture: Studies in History and Theory (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1979)
Ellison, David. Ethics and Aesthetics in European Modernist Literature (Cambridge UP, 2001)
Haywood, Ian. Working-Class Fiction: from Chartism to Trainspotting (Plymouth: Northcote House Publishers, 1997)
Hoggart, Richard. The Uses of Literacy (Penguin Books, 1960)
Howarth, Peter. British Poetry in the Age of Modernism (Cambridge UP, 2005)
Hunt, Nigel C. Memory, War and Trauma (Cambridge UP, 2010)
Innes, Christopher. The Cambridge Companion to George Bernard Shaw (Cambridge UP, 1998)
Korte, Barbara, Frédéric Regard (eds.) Narrating Poverty and Precarity in Britain (Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter, 2014)
Leys, Ruth. Trauma-A Genealogy (Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press, 2000)
Lewis, Pericles. The Cambridge Introduction to Modernism (Cambridge UP, 2007)
Linehan, Thomas. Modernism and British Socialism (Palgrave Macmillan, 2012)
Luckhurst, Roger. The Trauma Question (London and New York: Routledge, 2008)
Punter, David. The Literature of Pity (Edinburgh UP, 2014)
Rabaté, Jean-Michel. 1913: The Cradle of Modernism (Blackwell Publishing, 2007)
Ramazani, Jahan. Poetry of Mourning: The Modern Elegy from Hardy to Heaney (The University of Chicago Press, 1994)
Russo, John and Sherry Lee Linkon. New Working-Class Studies (Ithaca and London: Cornell UP, 2005)
Sellers, Susan (ed.). The Cambridge Companion to Virginia Woolf (Cambridge UP, 2000)
Silkin, Jon (ed.) The Penguin Book of First World War Poetry (London: Penguin Books, 1978)

 

British Romanticism: prose

Course title: British Romanticism: prose
Instructor: Martina Domines Veliki, PhD
ECTS credits: 6
Language: English
Duration: 4th or 6th, 8th or 10th semester
in ac. year 2017/18: 4th or 6th semester

Status: elective
Course type: 1 hour of lecture, 2 hours of seminar
Enrollment requirements: enrollment in the 4th or 6th, 8th or 10th semester
Prerequisites: Introduction to English Literature

Course description: This module aims to engage students at a high level of scholarly rigour with the key themes, ideas and concerns of British Romanticism and with the wider historical, cultural and political contexts out of which they emerged. We will depart from the socio-historical contexts (Scottish Enlightenment, French Revolution, women rights) and a selection of texts which were central for the lively public debates of the period. We will then continue with the representative prose texts covering the gothic novel, the Scottish historical novel and Romantic confessional writing. Primary readings will be balanced with critical essays.
Course requirements: continuous assessment (midterm and final exam, final paper, class attendance and participation).

Weekly schedule:
Week 1: socio-historical context, from the Scottish Enlightenment to English Romanticism, excerpts from Edmund Burke: Reflections on the French Revolution, Thomas Paine: Rights of Man, Mary Wollstonecraft: A Vindication of the Rights of Women
Week 2: historical novel, Scottish national identity
Week 3: Sir Walter Scott (1814) Waverley
Week 4: Waverley
Week 5: autobiography, Romantic confessional narratives (from St. Augustine to Jean-Jacques Rousseau)
Week 6: James Hogg (1824) The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner
Week 7: Thomas de Quincey (1821) Confessions of an English Opium-Eater
Week 8: Mid-term exam
Week 9: gothic novel-genre development
Week 10: Horace Walpole (1764) The Castle of Otranto
 Week 11: Jane Austen (1817) Northanger Abbey
 Week 12: <Northanger Abbey some scenes from the movie Northanger Abbey directed by Jon Jones (2007)
Week 13: Mary Shelley (1818) Frankenstein
 Week 14: Frankensteincont. with some scenes from the movie Frankenstein (2004) directed by Kenneth Branagh
Week 15: End-term exam, seminar paper

Reading list:
Primary literature :
Sir Walter Scott (1814) Waverley
James Hogg (1824) The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner
Thomas de Quincey (1821) Confessions of an English Opium-Eater
Horace Walpole (1764), The Castle of Otranto
Jane Austen (1817) Northanger Abbey
Mary Shelley (1818) Frankenstein

Secondary literature:
Anderson, Linda. Autobiography (New York & London: Routlege, 2001)
Broadie, Alexander (ed.) The Cambridge Companion to the Scottish Enlightenment (Cambridge UP, 2003)
Burwick, Frederick. Thomas de Quincey: Knowledge and Power (Palgrave Macmillan, 2001)
Chandler, James. The Cambridge History of English Romantic Literature (Cambridge UP,
2008)
Clery, E. J. Women’s Gothic: from Clara Reeve to Mary Shelley. (Tavistock, 2004)
Copeland, Edward and Juliet McMaster (ed.) The Cambridge Companion to Jane Austen
(Cambridge UP, 1997)
Crawford, Robert (ed.). The Scottish Invention of English Literature (Cambridge UP, 1998)
Daiches, David. The Scottish Enlightenment (Edinburgh and Aberdeen: The Saltire Society,
1986)
De Bolla, Peter, Nigel Leask, David Simpson. Land, Nation, Culture: 1740-1840 (Palgrave Macmillan, 2005)
De Groot, Jerome. The Historical Novel (London, New York: Routledge, 2010)
Duncan, Ian. Scott’s Shadow: The Novel in Romantic Edinburgh (Princeton and Oxford:
Princeton University Press, 2007)
Duncan, Ian and Douglas S. Mack (ed.) The Edinburgh Companion to James Hogg
(Edinburgh UP, 2012)
Levi, Susan M. The Romantic Art of Confession (New York and Woodbridge: Camden
House1998)
Lukács Georg. The Historical Novel (London: Merlin Press, 1962)
McCalman, Ian. An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age: British Culture 1776-1832
(Oxford UP, 1999)
Moretti, Franco. Atlas of the European Novel, 1800-1900 (London and New York: Verso,
1998)
Moretti, Franco. Signs Taken for Wonders (London and New York, 1983)
Olney, James. Memory and Narrative: the weave of life-writing (Chicago: University of
Chicago Press, 2000)
Punter, David (ed.) A Companion to the Gothic (Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, 2008)
Robertson, Fiona (ed.). Edinburgh Companion to Sir Walter Scott (Edinburgh UP, 2012)
Smith, Joanna M. (ed.) Frankenstein: complete authoritative text with biographical and
historical contexts, critical history and essays from five contemporary critical perspectives. (Boston: Bedford Books of St Martin’s Press, 1992)
Smith, Sidonie, Julia Watson (eds.) Women, Autobiography, Theory: a Reader (Madison:
University of Wisconsin Press, 1998)
Townshend, Dale. The Orders of Gothic: Foucault, Lacan and the subject of Gothic
writing, 1764 – 1820 (New York: AMS Press, 2007)
Wu, Duncan (ed.). A Companion to Romanticism (Oxford: Blackwell, 1998)

The History and Paradigms of American Studies 2 (Šesnić, 2017)

Course title: The History and Paradigms of American Studies 2 (A, 19th c./20th c.)
Instructor: Dr. Jelena Šesnić
ECTS credits: 6
Status: elective (obligatory for American Studies majors in the 8th semester)
Enrollment requirements: enrollment in the 8th and/or 10th semester
Course description: This course is a companion course to the History and Paradigms of American Studies1 which investigates the origins of the discipline of American Studies. Since the 1970s, however, the discipline has undertaken to interrogate some of its main premises based on the changing conceptions of U.S. society and the nation-state. Even though the revisionist interventions begin to be felt already in the 1970s, we will posit as a starting point of our inquiry a methodological break observable in the 1980s as “ideology” becomes a necessary accompaniment of any AS inquiry. The next historical break—the end of the Cold War in 1989—indicates another momentous shift as we follow the developments thereafter. The next point of interest is 9/11 and the way it refocused the work in the discipline. These will demonstrate the efforts by so-called New Americanists to devise contesting models of American culture, while the emphases in their agendas may differ, as our readings will show. In the process of revising American Studies various theories have been made use of, ranging from New Historicism to poststructuralism, to ethnic/ race, feminist and gender studies to Marxism and cultural studies to international/ transnational perspectives. In the process it becomes evident how each new methodology in the discipline invents, as it were, a new conception of “America” as its object of study while ur-theories and underlying conceptions in the discipline of AS show great resilience and attest to continuity. In the last part of the course the foregoing theories will be tested on an array of texts. The course is obligatory for AS majors.

Course requirements: regular attendance, participation in class discussions, mid-term and final test (continuous assessment), presentation in class, written assignments and a final seminar paper

Syllabus (alterations possible):

Week 1: Laying the ground for (new) American Studies: disciplinary premises and theoretical frameworks (Fluck, L. Marx, Pease, Spanos)

Week 2: Ideology and readings of American artefacts in the 1980s (L. Marx: revision of American pastoralism; Slotkin, Prince: revision of the frontier myth), Bercovitch

Week 3: Ideology and readings of American artefacts: identity approaches (ethnic, race, gender, border, class and religious identities) Morrison, Kaplan, Carby

Week 4: Identity approaches (cont.): Parikh, Stievermann, Dallmann

Week 5: Identity approaches (cont.): Banita, Boesenberg, O’Neill

Week 6: Framing the transnational turn: from national to post-national studies : Pease, Shapiro, Shu

Week 7: Mid-term test. Individual project discussions.

Week 8: Framing the transnational turn: imperial, hemispheric and globalist approaches (Anzaldúa, Pisarz-Ramirez, Rowe)

Week 9: Post 9/11 and a new state of the discipline: Pease, Aravamudan, Merodovoi, Gray

Week 10: Contemporary America: politics, society, the economy (Pease; Spanos; Grgas)

Week 11: Case study 1: Benjamin Franklin’s Autobiography (1791, 1793; Shapiro)

Week 12: Case study 2: Lin-Manuel Miranda: Hamilton (musical, 2015) (The Federalist Papers, 1787/88; Ambrose)

Week 13: Case study 3: C. L. R. James: Mariners, Renegades and Castaways: The Story of Herman Melville and the World We Live In (excerpts) (Pease)

Week 14: Individual project and seminar paper topics presentation and discussions.

Week 15: Final test; course evaluation.

Readings (selection)

-Bercovitch, Sacvan, and Myra Jehlen, eds. Ideology and Classic American Literature. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1986. (selection)

– Castronovo, Russ, and Susan Gillman, eds. States of Emergency: The Object of American Studies. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 2009. (selection)

– Dallmann, Antje, et al., eds. Approaches to American Cultural Studies. London and New York Routledge, 2016. (selection)

– Grgas, Stipe. Američki studiji danas: identitet, kapital, spacijalnost. Zagreb: Meandar, 2015. (selection)

– Fluck, Winfried, Donald E. Pease, and John Carlos Rowe, eds. Re-Framing the Transnational Turn in American Studies. Hanover, NH: Dartmouth College Press, 2011. (selection)

-Pease, Donald, and Robyn Wiegman, eds. The Futures of American Studies. Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2002. (selection)

– Rowe, John Carlos The Cultural Politics of the New American Studies. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Library, 2012.Open Humanities Press. http://www.scribd.com/doc/132330117/Rowe-The-Cultural-Politics-of-the-New-American-Studies (selection)

– Shu, Yuan, and Donald E. Pease, eds. American Studies as Transnational Practice: Turning towards the Transpacific. Hanover, NH: Dartmouth College P, 2015.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anglophone Modernist Women’s Writing

Course title: Anglophone Modernist Women’s Writing
Instructor:  Dr.Tihana Klepač
ECTS credits: 6
Language: English
Status: elective
Enrolment requirements: enrolment in 2nd or 4th semester
Course requirements: continuous assessment; regular attendance, work in class, 1 written assignment, mid-term and end-term exam.
Course description: Selected texts exemplify Anglophone literary modernism with stress on its colonial, national and the context of gender. In line with the new modernist studies we shall view modernisms as multiple, and occurring across various temporalities and geographies, whilst responding to the drive in postcolonial studies to reshape modernism with an awareness of the British Empire.
Objectives: The objective of the course is to awaken the students’ awareness to the mechanism which led to the formulation of modernism in different countries of the Anglophone world, and to raise their awareness of the necessity to discuss modernism in colonial, national and the context of gender.
Course requirements: The final grade is based on continuous assessment which includes regular attendance, preparation for and participation in class, writing small assignments, timely submission of the final paper, and obligatory sitting for mid-term and end-term exam. Students must meet all requirements of continuous assessment.

Week by week schedule:
Week 1
Space and topics of modernism – new approach
Douglas Mao and Rebecca L. Walkowitz: “The New Modernist Studies”

Week 2
Social context and development of literary forms in modernism in colonial, national and the context of gender.

Week 3
Modern Indian women’s writing: questioning of formal innovations of modernism and resistance toward Eurocentric modernity
Sarojini Naidu: The Golden Threshold, collection of poetry
Sarojini Naidu: “Nilambuya: The Fantasy of a Poet’s Mood,” “Education of Indian Women,” “Women in National Life,” essays

Week 4 and 5
Modern Canadian women’s writing: awareness of internationalism as a contrast to nationalist and regional characteristics of Canadian art as a main characteristic of Canadian modernism
Sara Jeanette Duncan: Cousin Cinderella

Week 6 and 7
Modern Caribbean women’s writing: writing at the crossroads of different literary forces – those of Caribbean literature, modernism, women’s writing, and postcolonialism
Jean Rhys: Woman in the Dark

Week 8
Mid-term exam + academic writing

Week 9 and 10
Modern South-African women’s writing: politicised modernism aesthetics
Olive Schreiner: From Man to Man

Week 11 and 12
Modern Australian women’s writing: representing colonial national through the criticism of colonial-provincial structures and a detailed recreation of national space
Christina Stead: The Man Who Loved Children

Week 12 and 13
Modern New Zealand women’s writing: questioning the representation of narration through a male viewpoint and in line with patriarchal values
Katherine Mansfield: Urewera Notebook, “How Pearl Button Was Kidnapped,” “The Woman at the Store,” “Je ne parle pas francois”

Week 14
End-term exam

Ethics and Aesthetics of British Modernism (archive 16/17)

Naziv kolegija: Ethics and Aesthetics of British Modernism
Instructor: Asst. Prof. Martina Domines Veliki
8/10 semester 2016/17

(or 4./6. semestar)
Language
: English

1 semester, summer
Status: izborni
Oblik nastave: 1 sat predavanja i 2 sat seminara tjedno
Uvjeti: Upisan 8./10. semestar
Ispit: Kontinuirano praćenje. Tijekom seminara studenti/ce trebaju izraditi jedan seminarski rad te ga prezentirati na satu. Rad u seminaru, seminarski rad te dva kolokvija konstitutivni su dio završne ocjene. Svi dijelovi ocjene moraju biti pozitivni da bi student/ica dobio/la zaključnu ocjenu.

Sadržaj: Na odabranom korpusu modernističkih tekstova analizirat ćemo osobine i tematiku modernizma. U završnom dijelu seminara usporedit ćemo modernizam s nekim djelima kasnijega razdoblja. – Audenovom pjesmom «U sjećanje na W. B. Yeatsa», Cunninghamovim romanom Sati i pripovijetkom iz Barnesove zbirke pripovijedaka Stol od četurnovine»

Cilj: Cilj kolegija je problemski pristupiti razdoblju modernizma. Uz upoznavanje dijela kanona britanskoga i irskoga modernizma, u kolegiju će se raspraviti i temeljna pitanja o ulozi književnosti. ali i njezinoj ulozi u artikulaciji osobnoga i nacionalnoga identiteta u tom razdoblju. U kolegiju ćemo se također upoznati s relevantnim kritičkim metodama za promišljanje modernizma (psihoanalitička, poststrukturalistička, feministička, postkolonijalna/kulturološka kritika).

British Romanticism: prose (archive)

Course title: British Romanticism: prose
Instructor: Martina Domines Veliki, PhD
ECTS credits: 6
Language: English
Duration: 4th or 6th, 8th or 10th semester
in ac. year 2016/17 4th or 6th semester

Status: elective
Course type: 1 hour of lecture, 2 hours of seminar
Enrollment requirements: enrollment in the 4th or 6th, 8th or 10th semester
Course description: This module aims to engage students at a high level of scholarly rigour with the key themes, ideas and concerns of British Romanticism and with the wider historical, cultural and political contexts out of which they emerged. We will depart from the socio-historical contexts (Scottish Enlightenment, French Revolution, women rights) and a selection of texts which were central for the lively public debates of the period. We will then continue with the representative prose texts covering the gothic novel, the Scottish historical novel and Romantic life-writing. Primary readings will be balanced with critical essays.

Course requirements: continuous assessment (midterm and final exam, final paper, class attendance and participation).

Weekly schedule:

  1. week: socio-historical context, from the Scottish Enlightenment to English Romanticism, excerpts from Edmund Burke: Reflections on the French Revolution, Thomas Paine: Rights of Man, Mary Wollstonecraft: A Vindication of the Rights of Women
  2. week: gothic novel – genre development (Horace Walpole (1764)The Castle of Otranto)
  3. week: Ann Radcliffe (1794) The Mysteries of Udolpho
  4. week: Marry Shelley (1818) Frankenstein
  1. week: Frankenstein, cont.; chosen scenes from the movie Frankenstein (2004) dir. Kenneth Branagh
  2. week: historical novel, Scottish national identity
  3. week: Sir Walter Scott (1814) Waverley
  4. week: Mid-term exam, academic writing skills, topics for seminar papers
  5. week: autobiography, Romantic confessional narratives (from St. Augustine to Jean-Jacques Rousseau)
  6. week: Thomas de Quincey (1821) Confessions of an English Opium-Eater
  7. week: Confessions of an English Opium-Eater, cont.
  8. week: James Hogg (1824) The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner
  9. week: Dorothy Wordsworth (1800) The Grasmere Journal
  10. week: final remarks
  11. week: End-term exam

Reading list:
Primary literature:

Horace Walpole (1764), The Castle of Otranto
Ann Radcliffe (1794) The Mysteries of Udolpho
Marry Shelley (1818) Frankenstein
Sir Walter Scott (1814) Waverley
Thomas de Quincey (1821) Confessions of an English Opium-Eater
James Hogg (1824) The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner
Dorothy Wordsworth (1800) The Grasmere Journal

+

Reader with selected critical essays

Secondary literature:

– Anderson, Linda. Autobiography. New York & London: Routlege, 2001
– Broadie, Alexander. The Scottish Enlightenment: The Historical Age of the Historical Nation. Birlinn, 2001.
– Clery, E. J. Women’s Gothic: from Clara Reeve to Mary Shelley. Tavistock, 2004
– Crawford, Robert (ed.). The Scottish Invention of English Literature. Cambridge UP, 1998
– De Groot, Jerome. The historical novel. London, New York: Routledge, 2010
– Duncan, Ian. Scott’s Shadow: the novel in Romantic Edinburgh. Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2007
– Eakin, Paul John. How are lives become stories: making selves. Ithaca, London: Cornell University Press, 1999
Olney, James. Memory and Narrative: the weave of life-writing. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2000
– Punter, David (ed.) A Companion to the Gothic. Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, 2008
– Smith, Joanna M. (ed.) Frankenstein: complete authoritative text with biographical and historical contexts, critical history and essays from five contemporary critical perspectives. Boston: Bedford Books of St Martin’s Press, 1992
– Smith, Sidonie, Julia Watson (eds.) Women, Autobiography, Theory: a Reader. Madison: Unversity of Wisconsin Press, 1998
Townshend, Dale. The Orders of Gothic: Foucault, Lacan and the subject of Gothic writing, 1764 – 1820. New York: AMS Press, 2007

 

The History and Paradigms of American Studies 2 (Šesnić 2015)

Course title: The History and Paradigms of American Studies 2 (A, 19th c./20th c.)
Instructor: Dr. Jelena Šesnić
ECTS credits: 6
Status: elective (obligatory for American Studies majors in the 8th semester)
Enrollment requirements: enrollment in the 8th and/or 10th semester

Course description: This course is a companion course to the History and Paradigms of American Studies1 which investigated the origins of the discipline of American Studies. Since the 1970s, however, the discipline undertook to interrogate some of its main premises based on the changing conceptions of U.S. society and the nation-state. Even though the revisionist interventions begin to be felt already in the 1970s, we will posit as a starting point of our inquiry a methodological break observable in the 1980s as „ideology“ becomes a necessary accompaniment of any AS inquiry. The next historical break—the end of the Cold War in 1989—indicates another momentous shift as we follow the developments thereafter. The next point of interest is 9/11 and the way it refocused the work in the discipline. These will demonstrate the efforts by so-called New Americanists to devise contesting models of American culture, while the emphases in their agendas may differ, as our readings will show. In the process of revising American Studies various theories have been made use of, ranging from New Historicism to poststructuralism, to ethnic/ race, feminist and gender studies to Marxism and cultural studies to international/ transnational perspectives. Paralelly, it ought to become evident how each new methodology in the discipline invents, as it were, a new conception of „America“ as its object of study while ur-theories and underlying conceptions in the discipline of AS show great resilience and attest to continuity. The course is obligatory for AS majors.
Course requirements: regular attendance, participation in class discussions, mid-term and final test (continuous assessment), presentation in class, written assignments and a final seminar paper

Syllabus:

Primary texts:

  1. Alexander Hamilton, James Madison and John Jay: Federalist Papers (1788; selection)
  2. Ralph Waldo Emerson: selected essays
  3. Henry David Thoreau: Walden; or, Life in the Woods (1854; selection); „Civil Disobedience“
  4. W.E.B. DuBois: The Souls of Black Folk (1903; selection)
  5. Toni Morrison: Beloved (1987)
  6. Sherman Alexie: Reservation Blues (1995)

Week 1: Laying the ground for (new) American Studies: disciplinary premises and theoretical frameworks (Fluck, L. Marx)

Week 2: Ideology and readings of American (literary) artefacts in the 1980s (Bercovitch and Jehlen)

Week 3: Ideology and readings of American (literary) artefacts in the 1980s (Fisher)

Week 4: End of the Cold War and repositionings within the discipline (New Americanists and a new field-imaginary) (Pease)

Week 5: End of the Cold War and repositionings within the discipline (New Americanists and a new field-imaginary) (Rowe) (A short written response.)

Week 6: End of the Cold War and repositionings within the discipline (New Americanists and a new field-imaginary) (Kaplan)

Week 7: Mid-term test

Week 8: Framing the transnational turn (Radway)

Week 9: Framing the transnational turn (Porter)

Week 10: Framing the transnational turn (Elliott, Lauter) (A short written response.)

Week 11: Post 9/11 and a new state in/ of the discipline (Aravamudan)

Week 12: Post 9/11 and a new state in/ of the discipline (Kaplan)

Week 13: Post 9/11 and a new state in/ of the discipline (Pease) (Seminar paper due.)

Week 14: International American Studies (Chenetier, Kennedy)

Week 15: Final test; course evaluation

Readings (alterations possible)

-Bercovitch, Sacvan, and Myra Jehlen, eds. Ideology and Classic American Literature. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1986. (selection)

– Castronovo, Russ, and Susan Gillman, eds. States of Emergency: The Object of American Studies. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 2009. (selection)

– Fisher, Phillip. The New American Studies. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1991. (selection)
– Fluck, Winfried, Donald E. Pease, and John Carlos Rowe, eds. Re-Framing the Transnational Turn in American Studies. Hanover, NH: Dartmouth College Press, 2011. (selection)

-Pease, Donald, and Robyn Wiegman, eds. The Futures of American Studies. Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2002. (selection)

– Radway, Janice A., Kevin K. Gaines, Barry Shank, and Penny Von Eschen. American Studies: An Anthology. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 2009. (selection)
– Rowe, John Carlos The Cultural Politics of the New American Studies. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Library, 2012.Open Humanities Press. http://www.scribd.com/doc/132330117/Rowe-The-Cultural-Politics-of-the-New-American-Studies (selection)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 1960s in American Film, Literature, and Music

Professor Russell Reising
Office
B-008
Office hours:
from March 3, Thursday 14:00-15:00, Friday 12:00-13:00
Email:
russreising@gmail.com
Phone:
99 7952930 (Not after 10 PM or before 9 AM!)
All poems indicated are easily available online. Use links I have provided when possible.

March 3-4
Introduction and business
TEACHING STRATEGIES AND COURSE POLICIES/COURSE EXPECTATIONS:

I approach my literature course with two primary goals: to teach certain works of literature (subject matter) and to help students improve their reading, writing, and analytical skills. In my opinion, the second of these goals is the real function of my presentations and our class discussions. Students who are not dedicated to improving these skills rarely do well in my classes. Students who are passionate about their studies will find that I am willing to go to extraordinary lengths to help, focus, provoke, challenge, and inspire you. Students who do not do the work will find that I have little patience or respect for those who squander their educational opportunities. Even if the particular subject matter we are studying does not greatly interest you, use the course to improve your communication and analytical skills.
I expect students to have finished all readings by the first class for which they are assigned, and I expect students to have given some thought to these works’ primary themes, mysteries, styles, etc. before coming to class. Students who have done these two things do much better in my classes than do students who don’t. I do not regard it as my responsibility to explain our works to students who haven’t done the reading. I do not accept late papers!
I assume you all know the plot, and, unless you tell me otherwise, I will assume you have a comfortable understanding of the work on the literal level. It is completely up to students to ask questions about works and/or issues that trouble or elude them. I would love it if each class could be spent with me responding to students’ questions, problems, provocations, etc. I believe that students who struggle with the meanings of works of literature and try out their own interpretive ideas learn much more than do students who sit back and simply expect to have the materials explained. That might do in some courses or in some disciplines; I can’t imagine it being responsible pedagogy or student behavior in upper-division literature courses.
I will very rarely spend time discussing the biographical and/or historical contexts of the works we study unless they bear directly on the discussions we are having or on the analytical points I want to make. Nor should students spend time in their formal essays simply rehearsing the biography of the author or some irrelevant historical data. My courses stress issues much more than they do historical or biographical factoids. Given the richness of many internet sources for such information, I regard it as irresponsible to waste your time with insignificant details that anyone can easily find with a well-focused google search! This is not to say that students aren’t encouraged to probe the biographical or historical contexts of our materials, only that I won’t dwell inordinately on them unless they are truly germane to our approach.
I tend not to use highly organized class notes for our discussions, as I try to make each class responsive to students’ needs. This results in class discussions that some students find less organized than those they are used to or prefer. All students, therefore, are strongly encouraged to ask questions as they arise and also to take good notes.
I do not assign topics for your formal essays, but I will help you in any way necessary as you formulate and refine your topics and approaches. I believe that struggling with the material, coming up with a topic, refining that topic, and then writing and revising a paper are all crucial elements in how/what students learn when they approach a writing assignment. Professors who assign specific topics are simply giving so many take home essay exam assignments. I believe that people all learn in many different ways, reading the assigned works of literature, consulting secondary sources, participating in class discussions, and in all facets of composing a formal essay. Some students like to join in class discussions and/or ask questions; others prefer quietly processing what goes on in class. I try to make room for all learning styles, but I do, as I say above, expect students to work hard and to complete all the assignments on time.

Russ’s World Weary Guidelines for Writers of Academic Papers

(These guidelines constitute the basis of what I expect in your written work!)

  1. Unless instructed otherwise, you should assume that your audience knows the work you are writing about at the literal level, but that they can be enlightened about important themes, characters, interconnections, and other significant stylistic elements in the work. As a writer, you reveal something not obvious about the work(s) you write about. Plot summary is almost never good, and almost the only times you should be discussing the plot of the work is to provide evidence for the analytical point you are making.
  2. A good, analytical essay will begin with a thesis section in which you articulate what you are writing about and provide some sense of what is significant about the position you will be advancing. A good thesis is argumentative, i.e., it advances a position that is debatable and not merely obvious to any one who has experienced the same work of art. A good thesis teaches your reader what to expect and pay attention to, and it helps guide and discipline your own writing. Think of it as a contract between you and your reader, committing you to perform a specific analytical task.
  3. A good conclusion should never merely repeat the “main points” of your paper. Repetition and redundancy rarely characterize a good conclusion. Read almost any substantial article in almost any quality periodical; their conclusions NEVER merely repeat, summarize, or restate their main points. A good conclusion should sound conclusive, not repetitious! Good conclusions can do many things; experiment with different ways of “concluding” your paper on a strong note, not with a throw-away paragraph that merely repeats what you have already done.
  4. An analytical essay should represent the highest level of sophistication and specificity you have reached in your consideration of a work. In other words, it should report your conclusions, not your “thinking in progress.” You should never include passages that merely rehearse your encounters with the poem, as in:

“When I first read this poem, I thought it meant X, but, after deeper reading and more careful consideration, I now believe it means Y.”

This might be an accurate history of your experience with the poem/novel/story/ play/film/song/etc., and it might well be an important consideration as you plan your paper, but it has no place in a finished, formal essay. Similarly, almost all references to “I think,” “I feel,” “In my opinion,” etc. should be strictly avoided. They are useless.

  1. I will evaluate your formal essays with attention to all possible elements of the written language, from the content to syntactic, grammatical, mechanical, organizational and other rhetorical elements of your work. Please note: error free writing is not necessarily good writing! Good writing will engage the reader with solid content, logical analysis, coherent organization at the paragraph and essay level, and with lively, varied sentences that don’t lull the reader with monotonous, repetitious words, sentence structures, sentence lengths, or ideas.
  2. Most importantly, your essay should communicate your ideas about a work. Your thesis (not the “plot” of the work) will be the driving force of your paragraphs and of your entire essay. Most of your paragraphs should begin by indicating how this particular paragraph furthers the analytical thesis you advanced in your thesis/introductory section. Papers and paragraphs that begin with plot summary rarely do more than merely summarize.
  3. I will fail any student who plagiarizes any work in this course, and I will pursue their expulsion from the university. If you have any doubt at all about what constitutes academic dishonesty, please contact me before turning in any work.

March 10-11
Reading week

March 17-18; March 24-25
Unit One: “Something’s Happening Here”
Films
: The Graduate, The Swimmer

Novel: Norman Mailer, Armies of the Night
Albums: Bob Dylan, The Times They Are A-Changin’
Simon and Garfunkel, Bookends

First: try to understand and appreciate each work as a unique work of art. Pay attention to its style, its themes and motifs, its characters, its imagery and metaphors. Try to formulate an interpretive perspective for each work individually, and then try to related each work to the others in the unit. This reminder will introduce the study guides for each unit!

Unit One Study Guide and Questions:
As the Buffalo Springfield song, “For What It’s Worth,” puts it, “Something’s happening here//What it is ain’t exactly clear.” Many artists and cultural spokespeople recognized that something was changing, and they wrote books, composed songs, and directed films in various attempts to address, assess, and understand these changes. If John Fitzgerald Kennedy suggested that “the only thing that doesn’t change is change itself,” popular artists offered their own versions of this state of affairs in songs like “Change is Now” (the Byrds) and in albums like Forever Changes (Love). The United States emerged from World War II and the 1950s in a position of unprecedented economic, military, and cultural power, and yet, by the early years of the decade, cultural spokespeople were no longer confident that the society was good, moral, progressive. They, like Hamlet, thought that there was something rotten in the U.S. Like many generations before them, take the middle decades of the nineteenth century and the social criticisms articulated by writers like Henry David Thoreau (very popular in the 1960s), Ralph Waldo Emerson, Frederick Douglass, Margaret Fuller, and Herman Melville, writers, thinkers, and artists turned their moral and ethical vision to what they believed to be the crises of the 1960s. Women, African-Americans, draftees, folk musicians, and students all began to question American values and American ideas in powerful new ways.

  1. How do the works collected in this unit represent and analyze the nature of change during the decade of the 1960s?
  2. How do these works define “the past” and the current state of affairs in the U.S., and how do the characters in these works attempt to break away from the conventions and habits of the past?
  3. Are these changes good, bad, neutral, successful, unsuccessful
  4. What common themes and motifs link these works?
  5. Does any coherent picture emerge of the status quo, of youth, of values, of “the American way”?
  6. What other works of art can you compare with those included in our work for Unit One?

Unit Two

March 24-25; March 31/ April 1; April 7-8
Unit Two: Boys, Girls, and “The Man”
Films
: Easy Rider, Cool Hand Luke

Novel: Ken Kesey, One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest
Albums: Joni Mitchell, Ladies of the Canyon
Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young, Déjà vu
As always, try to understand and appreciate each work as a unique work of art. Pay attention to its style, its themes and motifs, its characters, its imagery and metaphors. Try to formulate an interpretive perspective for each work individually, and then try to related each work to the others in the unit

Study Guide and Questions:
One of the dominant themes of culture during the 1960s was the emergence (maybe the re-emergence) of a unique version of individualism, often understood in conflict with conventional society. Ralph Waldo Emerson (in essays like “Self Reliance” and “The American Scholar”) and Henry David Thoreau had championed such individualism in the middle of the nineteenth century, and many counter-culture spokespeople drew on their works and philosophies for inspiration. Thoreau’s Walden, for example, was very popular reading during the 60s. Each of these works explores the tensions between individuals and conventional society. Some conclude that the “free” individual will always be crushed by the forces of conformity, while others suggest the possibility of strong individuals establishing some kind of life safe from the confines and intrusions of “the man.”

  1. What is the role of nostalgia in each of these works of art? How do they understand/value the past (or some version of it) as a possible source of value and stability in an increasingly technological and commercial world?
  2. How does each of these works represent the individual capable of challenging the “crushing” values of the present?
  3. How do they represent the forces that try to contain, confine, alter, or otherwise neutralize challenges to the status quo?
  4. How do they represent tensions, contradictions, and inconsistencies within the characters trying to break out of or reform the “system”?
  5. What are the primary contradictions examined and dramatized in these works? How do they relate to the issues and themes of the other units of our course?

April 14-15; April 21-22; May 5-6
Unit Three: Communist Infiltration and Nuclear Terror
Films;
Dr Strangelove, Fail Safe, and Invasion of the Body Snatchers

Novel: DeLillo, End Zone
Selected music provided by Professor Reising
Read essay by Professor Reising in Cultural Logic, posted at: http://clogic.eserver.org/2003/reising.html

  1. Love/sex:the film is called Dr. Strangelove, after all! What vision of human emotions, love, and family relationships under the pressures of the Cold War does this film communicate?
  2. Suspicion: how do suspicion, paranoia, and a general environment of fear and distrust between the U.S.A. and the U.S.S.R. figure in the film? Are there areas of commonality between the two cultures, or does the film represent some absolute difference?
  3. Machines/Technology: Strangelove and Fail Safe repeatedly discuss the impact of machines and the mechanization of military weaponry, especially through computerization. What kind of commentary do they offer on technology and human life?
  4. Religion:while not a dominant theme in these films, religion and/or a belief or set of beliefs in god figures into these scenarios of the end of the human race. What is the role of religion in these films and in other works from the Cold War era?
  5. What are the other themes, recurring images, and interesting moments in these films? Be able to discuss the films in their entirety.
  6. Strangelove makes use of soundtrack songs, while Fail Safe is one of the few movies I know of without any soundtrack music whatsoever. Think about the role of music in the one and the absence of music in the other.
  7. How do both films characterize the relationship between Americans and Soviets? What are the people like? Who is to blame for the events that both films examine?

Invasion of the Body Snatchers (original, 1955 version; new version as well, if possible)
The Blob (Original 1958 version; new version as well, if possible)
Invaders from Mars (Original 1953 version; new version as well, is possible)
The Manchurian Candidate 1962
The Spy Who Came in From the Cold

This might seem like a strange grouping of films, but there is a method to the plan. Think about ways that these works address similar concerns and fears, even though their tones, styles, and explicit themes might differ significantly.

  1. What is the ultimate threat presented in all of these works? Where does it come from? How is it defined and identified?
  2. How do the “heroes” of these works establish themselves in opposition to the threat posed by “alien” invasion and infiltration?
  3. How do the tones and atmospheres of these workss contribute to their overall themes and sense of urgency?
  4. What vision of human emotions, love, and family relationships under the pressures of the Cold War do these works communicate?
  5. While each of these works suggests that mindless and robotic conformity is a constant and serious threat to American ideas of “freedom,” each film nevertheless celebrates some element of human (i.e., “American”) individualism that cannot be extinguished. How do they do so?
  6. How do these works contain scenes, characters, and situations that have a specifically Cold War relevance? What are those scenes, and how do they fit into the films as a whole?

May 12-13; May 19-20 (Holiday no classes); May 26-27
Unit Four: Rage and Protest
Films
: Wild in the Streets, Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner

Novel: Don DeLillo, Great Jones Street
Poem: Ginsberg, Howl
Albums: Jefferson Airplane, Volunteers,
James Brown,
Say it Loud, I’m Black and I’m Proud

Selected music
As always, try to understand and appreciate each work as a unique work of art. Pay attention to its style, its themes and motifs, its characters, its imagery and metaphors. Try to formulate an interpretive perspective for each work individually, and then try to relate each work to the others in the unit.

Study Guide and Questions:
Revolution, rebellion, the so-called generation gap, the “Black Power” movement, the emergence of feminism, SDS, PLP, SLF, Black Panthers, White Panthers, and many other groups and energies remain one of the enduring images from the 1960s. They all seemed to take inspiration from Marlon Brando’s (in The Wild One) answer to the question of “What are you rebelling against, Johnny?” Brando responded: “What do you got?” Fragile yet intense, revolutionary energies during the 1960s were fed by the fears of the Cold War, the war in Vietnam (and a gradual realization that the foreign policy of the United States had been much less than admirable), the draft, urban unrest, conformity (suburbs and business suits didn’t appeal to people reading Walden), oppression, social injustice, racism, and, according to some, too much affluence. Radical politics, communal living experiments, resistance to the draft, questioning of traditional gender roles and conventional images of “success” fueled much of the culture of the period.

Each of these works represents some version of political struggle against the “establishment.”

  1. How do the characters/protagonist/point of view in each work define “the establishment,” and what strategies does it employ in its struggle?
  2. How does each work depict the social/political context it explores? How do the individuals or groups represented in the work relate to that context?
  3. What would count as a successful rebellion against the status quo in these works? Do these works succeed or fail in their struggles?
  4. What connections can you draw among the works included in this unit?
  5. Beginning with Howl, these artists try to capture a broad range of emotional, intellectual, social, and political realities. Sometimes this range is so diverse as to seem almost incoherent or contradictory. Try to understand these diverse elements within each work and among the various works in the unit.

June 2-3; June 9-10 Conclusions and Student Presentations

 

Narrative DissemiNation of the Land of Oz

Instructor: Assoc. Prof. Iva Polak
ECTS credits: 6
Language: English
Status: elective
Semester: 2 or 4
Enrolment requirements:
enrolment in any graduate studies of the English Department

Course description: Selected literary and cinematic texts from the 2nd half of the 20th cent. are studied in the light of contemporary reinscriptions of Australian identity. Issues such as colonialism and postcolonialism,  mainstream vs. margin, history vs. story, are discussed to show complexities of Australian national identity formation and its contemporary renderings. Due to the relative remoteness of Australian space, the course includes a survey Australian cultural history as well as a survey of the culture of the First Australians.
Objectives: The aim is to awaken students’ awareness of some of the distinctive features of Australian contemporary literature and cinema as well as to show the necessity of a different approach to Aboriginal texts due to their culture-specific content.
Course requirements: the final grade is based on continuous assessment which includes regular attendance, preparation for and participation in class, writing small assignments, timely submission of the final paper, and obligatory sitting for midterm and endterm exams. The paper is worth 35%, midterm and endterm exam are worth 50% and other elements of continuous assessment are worth 15% of the final grade. Students must fulfill all elements of continuous assessment.
The exact date of the mid-term exam is defined in cooperation with the students.
Themes for the main written assignment (student paper) are selected during week 8.

Week by week schedule:

Week 1
Introducing the nation:  Colonial and Postcolonial History of Australia: a survey of key historical moments
Week 2
A Historical Survey: continued
Alternative histories: dissemiNation
Homi K. Bhabha: “DissemiNation: Time, narrative and the margins of modern nations” in The Location of Culture
Benedict Anderson. “Introduction” in Imagined Communities
Introduction of key theoretical terms from Post-Colonial Studies: The Key Concepts

Week 3
DissemiNation of the past and present
Michel Foucault.  “Of Other Spaces” in Heterotopia and the City
John Marsden and Shaun Tan. The Rabbits (1998) (graphic book)
Shaun Tan. The Arrival.  (2006) (graphic novel)
Bruce Sterling. “Slipstream 2” in Science Fiction Studies

Week 4
The Arrival: cont.
Chasing Asylum (2016) documentary BBC4 Storyville series, dir.  Eva Orner
Week 5
DissemiNation of the future
The Rover (2014) dir. David Michôd
Week 6
DissemiNation of Contemporary “Australianness”:  New Australian middleclass
Christos Tsiolkas. The Slap (2009)
Week 7
The Slap cont.
Week 8
Midterm (45min)
Introduction to Aboriginal Australia: a precolonial-postcolonial-neocolonial survey
Week 9
Introduction to Aboriginal Australia cont.
Contact (2009) documentary
Cannibal Story (2013) animated short
Christine Nicholls. “‘Dreamtime’ and ‘The Dreaming’ – an introduction” (2014)
Christine Nicholls. “Dreaming and place – Aboriginal monsters and their meanings” (2014)
Week 10
DissemiNation of Contemporary Aboriginality: humour and contemporary moment
Gayle Kennedy. Me, Antman & Fleabag (2007)
Week 11
DissemiNation of Contemporary Aboriginality: humour and trauma
Louis Nowra. Radiance (1993). (play)
Radiance (1998) dir. Rachel Perkins
Week 12
DissemiNation of Contemporary Aboriginality: humour and resilience
Charlie’s Country (2014) dir. Rolf de Heer
Week 13
Final discussion

Week 14
Endterm exam (45min)

Fiction
John Marsden and Shaun Tan. The Rabbits (1998) (graphic novel)
Shaun Tan. The Arrival (2006) (graphic novel)
Christos Tsiolkas. The Slap (2009) (novel)
Gayle Kennedy. Me, Antman & Fleabag (2007) (novel)
Louis Nowra. Radiance (1993) (play)

Feature films:
The Rover (2014) dir. David Michôd
Cannibal Story (2013) animated short
Radiance (1998) dir. Rachel Perkins
Charlie’s Country (2014) dir. Rolf de Heer

Documentaries:
Chasing Asylum
(2016) dir.  Eva Orner
Contact (2009)

Criticism:
– Anderson, Benedict. Imagined Communities. Reflection on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism. Revised Edition. London/New York: Verso. 2006. (excerpts)
– Ashcroft, Bill, Gareth Griffiths and Helen Tiffin Eds. Post-Colonial Studies: The Key Concepts. London/New York: Routledge, 2002. (selected terms)
– Ashcroft, Bill. “Is Australian Literature Post-Colonial?”.  Modern Australian Criticism and Theory. Eds. David Carter and Wang Guanglin. Qingdao: China Ocean University Press. 2010: 1-13.
– Bhabha, Homi K. The Location of Culture. London and New York: Routledge. 2004 (1994) (excerpts)
– Holt, Lillian. “Aboriginal humour: A conversational corroboree”. Serious Frolic: Essays on Australian Humour. Eds. Fran De Groen and Peter Kirkpatrick, St Lucia, Queensland: UQP, 2009: 81-94.
– Milner Davis, Jessica “ ‘Aussie’ humour and laughter: Joking as an acculturating ritual”. Serious Frolic: Essays on Australian Humour. Eds. Fran De Groen and Peter Kirkpatrick, St Lucia, Queensland: UQP, 2009: 31-47.
– Nicholls, Christine. “‘Dreamtime’ and ‘The Dreaming’ – an introduction”. A Year in Life of Australia. The Conversation. Ed. The Conversation, Sydney: Future Leaders. 2014: 77-82.
– Nicholls, Christine. “Dreaming and place – Aboriginal monsters and their meanings”. A Year in Life of Australia. The Conversation. Ed. The Conversation, Sydney: Future Leaders, 2014: 82-91.

Additional critical editions:
– Banerjee, Bidisha. “Kinship between ‘companion species’: A posthuman refiguration of the immigrant condition in Shaun Tan’s The Arrival”. Journal of Postcolonial Writing, 2016: 1-15.
– Casey, Maryrose. “Bold, Black, and Brilliant: Aboriginal Australian Drama”. A Companion to Australian Aboriginal Literature. Ed. Belinda Wheeler. Rochester, New York: Camden House. 2013: 155-171.
– Farca, Paula Anca. “Humour in Contemporary Adult Fiction.” A Companion to Australian Aboriginal Literature. Ed. Belinda Wheeler. Rochester, New York: Camden House. 2013: 125-138.
– Ommundsen, Wenche. “Work in Progress: Multicultural Writing in Australia”. Modern Australian Criticism and Theory. Eds. David Carter and Wang Guanglin. Qingdao: China Ocean University Press, 2010: 243-257.
– Sterling, Bruce. “Slipstream 2”. Science Fiction Studies, 38:1, 2011: 6-10.
– Verevis, Constantine. “ ‘Whose side are you on?’ The Slap (2011/2015)”, Continuum: Journal of Media & Cultural Studies, 29:5, 2015: 769-779.

All textual and audio-visual materials are provided in electronic form.

 

 

Contemporary Irish Literature and Culture: Playing with the Past

Dr. Aidan O’Malley, visiting lecturer
Subject: Modern literature
Course title: Contemporary Irish Literature and Culture: Playing with the Past
ECTS credits: 6
Language: English
Duration: 1 semester, 8th and 10th (2015)
Status: elective
Course type: lectures, seminars

Overview

This course examines a selection of the most important Irish literary and filmic texts of the last 30-40 years. At the heart of this module is an examination of how these texts play with and disrupt conceptions of the Irish past (and, indeed, of history itself). This process of unsettlement is viewed primarily from a postcolonial perspective—in terms, that is, of how this engagement with the past reflects upon contemporary Ireland. To facilitate this, students will also be introduced to important essays in the development of postcolonial discourse in Ireland.
With one exception, the novels to be examined are placed at the end of this course in order to allow time for these to be read. Students intending to take this module should immediately acquire and read Flann O’Brien’s novel, The Third Policeman.

A list of suggested secondary readings will be issued in the class.

Course Requirements

  • 10-15 minute oral presentation
  • Mid-term exam (you are not permitted to answer the question on the text you presented)
  • Final exam (you are not permitted to answer the question on the text you presented)
  • 2,000 word essay based on your presentation. Plagiarism will result in a fail grade.
  • Attendance and participation in class

Course Outline

  1. Introduction to the course: overview of 20th-century Irish literature and history
  1. Documentaries: Peter Lennon (dir.), The Rocky Road to Dublin (1967); Maurice Sweeney (dir.), Flann O’Brien: The Lives of Brian(2006)
  1. Rethinking Irish experience in a postcolonial frame: Seamus Deane, Civilians and Barbarians (1983); Declan Kiberd, ‘A New England Called Ireland’ (from Inventing Ireland, 1995)

 

  1. Re-performing the past 1: Flann O’Brien, The Third Policeman (1967)
  1. Re-performing the past 2: Brian Friel, Making History(1989)
  1. Re-performing the past 3: Terry Eagleton, Saint Oscar(1989)
  1. Re-performing the past 4: Thomas Kilroy, Double Cross (1986)
  1. Mid-term Exam
  1. Film 1: Neil Jordan(dir.), The Crying Game (1992),The Butcher Boy (1997),Breakfast on Pluto (2005)
  1. Film 2: John Crowley (dir.), Intermission (2003); Martin McDonagh (dir.), In Bruges (2008);John Michael McDonagh (dir.), Calvary (2014)
  1. Contemporary fiction 1: John McGahern, Amongst Women(1990)
  1. Contemporary fiction 2: Joseph O’Connor, Star of the Sea(2002)
  1. Contemporary fiction 3: Donal Ryan, The Spinning Heart(2012)
  1. Final Exam

 

 

The History and Paradigms of American Studies 2 (Šesnić – 2016)

Course title: The History and Paradigms of American Studies 2 (A, 19th c./20th c.)
Instructor: Dr. Jelena Šesnić
ECTS credits: 6
Status: elective (obligatory for American Studies majors in the 8th semester)
Enrollment requirements: enrollment in the 8th and/or 10th semester

Course description: This course is a companion course to the History and Paradigms of American Studies1 which investigated the origins of the discipline of American Studies. Since the 1970s, however, the discipline undertook to interrogate some of its main premises based on the changing conceptions of U.S. society and the nation-state. Even though the revisionist interventions begin to be felt already in the 1970s, we will posit as a starting point of our inquiry a methodological break observable in the 1980s as „ideology“ becomes a necessary accompaniment of any AS inquiry. The next historical break—the end of the Cold War in 1989—indicates another momentous shift as we follow the developments thereafter. The next point of interest is 9/11 and the way it refocused the work in the discipline. These will demonstrate the efforts by so-called New Americanists to devise contesting models of American culture, while the emphases in their agendas may differ, as our readings will show. In the process of revising American Studies various theories have been made use of, ranging from New Historicism to poststructuralism, to ethnic/ race, feminist and gender studies to Marxism and cultural studies to international/ transnational perspectives. Paralelly, it ought to become evident how each new methodology in the discipline invents, as it were, a new conception of „America“ as its object of study while ur-theories and underlying conceptions in the discipline of AS show great resilience and attest to continuity. The course is obligatory for AS majors.
Course requirements: regular attendance, participation in class discussions, mid-term and final test (continuous assessment), presentation in class, written assignments and a final seminar paper

Syllabus:
Week 1: Laying the ground for (new) American Studies: disciplinary premises and theoretical frameworks (Fluck, L. Marx)
Week 2: Ideology and readings of American artefacts in the 1980s (L. Marx: revision of American pastoralism; Slotkin: revision of the frontier myth)
Week 3: Ideology and readings of American artefacts in the 1980s and beyond: identity approaches (ethnic, race, gender, border, class and religious identities) Tompkins, Morrison
Week 4: Identity approaches (cont.): Lowe, J.D. Saldívar
Week 5: Identity approaches (cont.): Wiegman, Lauter (A short written response.)
Week 6: End of the Cold War and repositionings within the discipline (New Americanists and a new field-imaginary) (Kaplan, Denning)
Week 7: Mid-term test
Week 8: Framing the transnational turn: from national to post-national studies : Armstrong and Tennenhouse, Shapiro, R. Saldívar
Week 9: Framing the transnational turn: imperial, hemispheric and globalist approaches (Walsh, Pease )
Week 10: Post 9/11 and a new state of the discipline: Rowe, Kaplan
Week 11: Post 9/11 and a new state of the discipline: Bayoumi, Enker (A short written response.)
Week 12: Pasts and futures of American Studies: technologies of culture (Lipsitz, Cohen)
Week 13: Pasts and futures of American Studies: post-race (Benn Michaels), class (Lott), religion (Mechling)
Week 14: Pasts and futures of American Studies: space, place and environment (Buell, Dimock) Seminar paper due.
Week 15: Final test; course evaluation.

Readings (expanded list)

-Bercovitch, Sacvan, and Myra Jehlen, eds. Ideology and Classic American Literature. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1986. (selection)
– Castronovo, Russ, and Susan Gillman, eds. States of Emergency: The Object of American Studies. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 2009. (selection)
– Fisher, Phillip. The New American Studies. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1991. (selection)

– Fluck, Winfried, Donald E. Pease, and John Carlos Rowe, eds. Re-Framing the Transnational Turn in American Studies. Hanover, NH: Dartmouth College Press, 2011. (selection)
– Grgas, Stipe. Američki studiji danas: identitet, kapital, spacijalnost. Zagreb: Meandar, 2015. (selection)
-Pease, Donald, and Robyn Wiegman, eds. The Futures of American Studies. Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2002. (selection)
– Radway, Janice A., Kevin K. Gaines, Barry Shank, and Penny Von Eschen. American Studies: An Anthology. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 2009. (selection)

– Rowe, John Carlos The Cultural Politics of the New American Studies. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Library, 2012.Open Humanities Press. http://www.scribd.com/doc/132330117/Rowe-The-Cultural-Politics-of-the-New-American-Studies (selection)