Category Archives: 9. semestar – NASTAVNIČKI SMJER – dvopredmetni

Language and cognition: from theory to application

Instructor: Assistant professor Renata Geld, PhD
Course title: Language and cognition: from theory to application
Language: English
Number of hours per semester: 30 hours
ECTS: 4 credits
Level: graduate (graduate course open to all graduate students of English)
Course content: Students attending this course will be encouraged to discover and re-discover the nature of language and its relation to various aspects of cognition, aa well as hypothesize the relevance of this relationship for various fields of science and everyday life. They will situate linguistics and language within the realm of cognitive science, and they will be invited to discuss the importance of interdisciplinary thought in education.
Being a sophisticated and complex phenomenon, language offers numerous insights into how our mind works, i.e. how language relates to thought. The aim of this course is to introduce the fundamental notions related to human conceptual organization and discuss evidence supporting the idea that language communicates with other cognitive processes. If this is so, the language we speak represents a source of information about the nature of our mental imagery and cognitive processes such as attention, judgment and categorization, perspective, etc. Furthermore, the interrelation between language and our perceptual and conceptual knowledge opens up possibilities to investigate how human interaction with the world and our specific sensory experience affects the nature of language. This, in turn, allows linguists, psychologists, educationalists, special needs educationalists and speech therapists, first and second language researchers, philosophers, computer scientists, cognitive scientists, and many others, to use language as a “diagnostic” tool to determine both highly individual and largely universal phenomena pertaining to the way we perceive, process and understand, store and use our knowledge. In addition, insights from language and studies of language have been widely used to explore other modes of communication, meaning construal and representation. For example: the language children speak tells us a great deal about how their perceptual and conceptual categories are formed; various elements in the language of the congenitally blind proved to be informative about their mental imagery and the role of alternate sensory input they experience; what we attend to in the process of learning something new tells us a great deal about what we already know and how our domains of knowledge relate to each other; the nature of visual representation of meaning as well as imagery in general have been investigated in relation to language and linguistic meaning construal.

The course structure:
Week 1
– Introduction to central notions and students’ existing knowledge and/or beliefs about them: linguistics and cognitive science, human mind, general cognitive processes, perception, mental imagery, concepts and conceptualization, experience and embodiment, language and linguistic meaning construal.
Week 2 – Cognitive science –significance of interdisciplinarity.
Week 3 – Students’ reports (students’ field(s) of interest and future profession, motivation for joining the course, and tentative ideas about the importance of fundamental notions introduced); the way we think, the way we learn, the way we teach.
Week 4 – Conceptual integration and human creativity.
Week 5 – The relationship between our body and mind, and the affect this relationship is likely to have on our thought and language.
Week 6 – What our language(s) reveal about our sensory experiences, cultural phenomena, and everyday life.
Week 7 – Continual assessment.
Week 8 – The nature of multimodal meaning construal: words and images.
Week 9 – Brainstorming and discussing ideas for individual micro-projects.
Week 10 – Presentation of topics for micro-projects.
Week 11 – How to test theoretical assumptions, conduct research, and apply relevant findings.
Week 12 – Consolidation and revision.
Week 13 – Students’ reports (micro-projects).
Week 14 – Students’ reports (micro-projects).
Week 15 – Students’ reports (micro-projects).

Required reading:
Carney, R. N. and Levin, J. R. (2002). Pictorial illustrations still improve students’ learning from text. Educational Psychology Review 14: 5-26.

Croft, W. and Wood, E. J. (2000). Construal operations in linguistics and artificial intelligence. In: Albertazzi, L. (ed.), Meaning and Cognition, A multidisciplinary approach. Amsterdam/ Philadelphia: John Benjamins.

Fauconnier, G. and Turner, M. (2003). “Polysemy and Conceptual Blending.” In Polysemy: Flexible Patterns of Meaning in Mind and Language. Edited by Brigitte Nerlich, Vimala Herman, Zazie Todd, and David Clarke. Berlin & New York: Mouton de Gruyter. Pages 79-94. A volume in the series Trends in Linguistics.

Fauconnier, G. and Turner, M. (2002). The Way We Think: Conceptual Blending and the Mind’s Hidden Complexities. New York: Basic Books. (selected chapters)

Gardner, H. (1985). The Mind’s New Science: A History of the Cognitive Revolution. New York: Basic Books. (chapters 3 and 7)

Geld, R. (2014). “Investigating meaning construal in the language of the blind: a cognitive linguistic perspective.” Suvremena lingvistika [Contemporary Linguistics]. 77. 27-59.

Geld, R. and Stanojević, M.-M. (2018). Strateško konstruiranje značenja riječju i slikom – konceptualna motivacija u ovladavanju jezikom [Strategic Construal of Meaning Using Words and Images: Cognitive Motivation in Second Language Learning]. Zagreb: Srednja Europa. (selected chapters)

Gibbs, W. R. (2006). Embodiment and Cognitive Science. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (selected chapters)

Langacker, R. W. (1999). Grammar and Conceptualization. Berlin & New York: Mouton de Gruyter. (selected chapters)

Parrill, F., Tobin, V., and Turner, M. (eds.) (2010). Meaning, Form, and Body. Stanford: Center for the Study of Language and Information. (selected chapters)

Schank, R. (2011). Teaching Minds: How Cognitive Science Can Save Our Schools. New York: Teachers College Press. (selected chapters)

Turner, M. (2014). The Origin of Ideas: Blending, Creativity, and the Human Spark. New York: Oxford University Press. (selected chapters)

At the end of this course, at a general level, the students will be able to:
– find relevant literature and read it critically;
– analyze and synthesize various data;
– participate in discussions argumentatively and open-mindedly;
– appreciate and accept criticism and other people’s opinions;
– initiate, design and conduct a small-scale research project.

At a more specific level, the students will be able to:
– consolidate their prior linguistic and general knowledge with new insights about the nature of language and human conceptualization;
– consolidate their prior linguistic and general knowledge with new insights about the interrelation between language and other cognitive processes;
– apply theoretical knowledge about the nature of language and cognition to their own areas of interest;
– recognize the relevance of certain interrelations between language and cognition for various scientific disciplines and fields of life.

Bilingualism

GRADUATE PROGRAMME – Master of Education in English Language and Literature

SINGLE AND DOUBLE MAJOR PROGRAMMES

semester 3

Course title: BILINGUALISM
Course coordinator:
Assistant Professor Renata Geld
Lecturer:
Stela Letica, Ph.D.
ECTS credits:
5
Language of instruction:
English
Duration:
semester III
Status:
elective
Form of instruction:
2 hours of lectures + 2 hours of seminar
Prerequisites: —
Examination:
continual assessment

Contents:
Definitions of bilingualism; overview of research in the field; relationship between individual and social bilingualism; dynamics of bilingual development (in natural and institutionalized contexts); language processing in bilingual individuals; crosslinguistic interaction within the bilingual system; communicative competence of bilinguals; monolingual and bilingual modes; code switching; language attrition; bilingualism and cognition; bilingualism and education.

Objectives:
Getting an insight into basic processes of bilingual development, specific aspects of linguistic and communicative competence of bilinguals and bilingual education.

Literature (selected chapters):
Aronin, L., & Singleton, D. (2012). Multilingualism (Vol. 30). John Benjamins Publishing.
Auer, P., & Wei, L. (Eds.).(2007). Handbook of multilingualism and multilingual communication (Vol. 5). Walter de Gruyter.
Cenoz, J., Hufeisen, B., & Jessner, U. (2003). The multilingual lexicon. Springer Netherlands.
Cenoz, J. (2009). Towards multilingual education: Basque educational research from an international perspective (Vol. 72). Multilingual Matters.
Helot, C.,&O’Laoire, M. (2011). Language Policy for the Multilingual Classroom. Bristol: Multilingual Matters.
Todeva, E., & Cenoz, J. (Eds.). (2009). The multiple realities of multilingualism: Personal narratives and researchers’ perspectives (Vol. 3). Walter de Gruyter.
Journals: Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, International Journal of Multilingualism, Language Awareness, Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development

 

Learners with special needs: blindness and SLA

Course title: Learners with special needs: blindness and SLA
Instructor: Asst. Prof. Renata Geld
ECTS credits: 3
Semester: IX
Status: elective
Enrollment requirements: none
Course description and objectives: The course offers basic aspects of interrelation between language, general cognitive processes and experience in relation to issues pertaining to language learning by the blind and visually impaired. Upon completing the course the students will be able to do the following: apply fundamental theoretical knowledge in practice; design and conduct simple studies dealing with language and its relation to other cognitive processes and aspects of experience; bridge the gap between certain theoretical findings and the needs of blind learners in their everyday learning environment; adjust teaching material and approaches to teaching to the needs of the blind; and consolidate previous knowledge about language, language acquisition and language teaching with the knowledge about specific needs of blind learners of L2.
Week by week schedule:

week topics
1 Fundamental concepts: blindness, legal blindness, visual impairment, individual differences
2 Motor and cognitive development: spatial cognition, joint attention, symbolic play, operational thinkingSocial interaction: prelinguistic development, theory of mind
3 Language development (part I): L1 development, relationship between language and thought, early words of blind children
4 Language development (part II): the issue of verbalism, lexicon, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics
5 Fundamental issues in L2 development
6 REVISION – Test 1
7 The visually impaired at school: everyday challenges
8 The visually impaired at school: the L2 classroom
9 The tactile exploration of the world and its relation to reading, writing, listening and speaking
10 Ways of testing theory in practice
11 REVISION – Test 2
12 Ways of testing theory in practice: microproject I – plans and drafts
13 Consolidation
14 Ways of testing theory in practice: microproject II – reports
15 Ways of testing theory in practice: microproject II – reports

 

Required reading:
Geld, R. and Šimunić, M. (2009). A case study of a blind speaker of English as L2, u Brdar, M., Omazić, M. i Pavičić-Takač V. (ed.) Cognitive Approaches to English: Some Fundamental Interdisciplinary and Applied Aspects, Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
Geld, R. 2006. Konceptualizacija i vidovi konstruiranja značenja: temeljne postavke i pojmovi kognitivnolingvističkog teorijskog okvira, Suvremena lingvistika, 62, pp. 183-211.
Hollins, M. (2000). Vision Impairment and Cognition. In: Silverstone, B., Lang, M.A., Rosenthal, B.P., Faye, E.E. (ed.) The Lighthouse Handbook on Vision Impairment and Vision Rehabilitation. Oxford University Press.
Landau, B. and Gleitman, L. R. (1985). Language and experience: Evidence from the blind child. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
Rosel, J., Caballer, A., Jara, P. and Oliver, J. C. (2005). Verbalism in the narrative language of children who are blind and sighted. Journal of Visual Impairment and Blindness, 413- 425.
Stančić, V. (1991). Oštećenja vida. Biopsihosocijalni aspekti. Školska knjiga, Zagreb.

Recommended reading:
Conti-Ramsden, G. and Perez-Pereira, M. (1999). Conversational interactions between mothers and their infants who are congenitally blind, have low vision, or are sighted. Journal of Visual Impairment and Blindness.
Dirven, R. and Verspoor, M. 2004. Cognitive Exploration of Language and Linguistics. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins.

 

Learners with special needs: blindness and SLA-archive

Course title: Learners with special needs: blindness and SLA
Instructor: Asst. Prof. Renata Geld
ECTS credits: 3
Semester: IX
Status: elective
Enrollment requirements: none
Course description and objectives: The course offers basic aspects of interrelation between language, general cognitive processes and experience in relation to issues pertaining to language learning by the blind and visually impaired. Upon completing the course the students will be able to do the following: apply fundamental theoretical knowledge in practice; design and conduct simple studies dealing with language and its relation to other cognitive processes and aspects of experience; bridge the gap between certain theoretical findings and the needs of blind learners in their everyday learning environment; adjust teaching material and approaches to teaching to the needs of the blind; and consolidate previous knowledge about language, language acquisition and language teaching with the knowledge about specific needs of blind learners of L2.


Week by week schedule:

week Topics
1 Fundamental concepts
Introduction
2 Fundamental concepts: visual impairment and L1 development
3 Fundamental concepts: perceptual nature of knowledge; language as an experiential phenomenon
4 Fundamental concepts: the nature of L2 in relation to other cognitive processes
5 Perspective and attention in L1 and L2
6 REVISION – Test 1
7 The visually impaired at school: everyday challenges
8 The visually impaired at school: the L2 classroom
9 The tactile exploration of the world and its relation to reading, writing, listening and speaking
10 Ways of testing theory in practice
11 REVISION – Test 2
12 Ways of testing theory in practice: microproject I – plans and drafts
13 Consolidation
14 Ways of testing theory in practice: microproject II – reports
15 Ways of testing theory in practice: microproject II – reports

 

Required reading:
Geld, R. and Šimunić, M. (2009). A case study of a blind speaker of English as L2, u Brdar, M., Omazić, M. i Pavičić-Takač V. (ed.) Cognitive Approaches to English: Some Fundamental Interdisciplinary and Applied Aspects, Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
Geld, R. 2006. Konceptualizacija i vidovi konstruiranja značenja: temeljne postavke i pojmovi kognitivnolingvističkog teorijskog okvira, Suvremena lingvistika, 62, pp. 183-211.
Hollins, M. (2000). Vision Impairment and Cognition. In: Silverstone, B., Lang, M.A., Rosenthal, B.P., Faye, E.E. (ed.) The Lighthouse Handbook on Vision Impairment and Vision Rehabilitation. Oxford University Press.
Landau, B. and Gleitman, L. R. (1985). Language and experience: Evidence from the blind child. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
Rosel, J., Caballer, A., Jara, P. and Oliver, J. C. (2005). Verbalism in the narrative language of children who are blind and sighted. Journal of Visual Impairment and Blindness, 413- 425.
Stančić, V. (1991). Oštećenja vida. Biopsihosocijalni aspekti. Školska knjiga, Zagreb.

Recommended reading:
Conti-Ramsden, G. and Perez-Pereira, M. (1999). Conversational interactions between mothers and their infants who are congenitally blind, have low vision, or are sighted. Journal of Visual Impairment and Blindness.
Dirven, R. and Verspoor, M. 2004. Cognitive Exploration of Language and Linguistics. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins.

 

Practicum 1 (3rd sem)

Course title: PRACTICUM 1
Instructors:
Asst. Prof. Renata Geld, Jasenka Čengić
ECTS credits: 2
Status
: mandatory
Semester
: III
Enrollment requirements
: none
Course description: Classroom observation. Elements of the lesson plan for an EFL class. Designing teaching activities.Post-teaching reflection. Self-assessment of teaching. Reacting to feedback. Cooperation with mentors.
Objectives
: Students will develop skills of focused and reflective classroom observation. They will also develop an understanding of the teaching competence components and the need for its development. They will be able to connect theoretical knowledge developed during the relevant university courses with the concrete examples of teaching observed in real classrooms.
Course requirements
: During practicums students will become prepared for observing their mentors’ teaching and for their own independent teaching. They will develop a lesson plan and required teaching materials for every lesson they will be teaching. Students will also keep a teaching practice diary which will be assessed at the end of the semester and contribute to the final course grade.

Week by week schedule:

Week Topics
1 Introduction
2 Classroom observation – foci
3 Designing activities for different levels of proficiency.
4 Designing activities for different age levels.
5 Designing lesson plans.
6 Classroom teaching in school.
7 Classroom teaching in school.
8 Classroom teaching in school.
9 Classroom teaching in school.
10 Classroom teaching in school.
11 Reflecting on teaching experience
12 Classroom teaching in school.
13 Classroom teaching in school.
14 Teaching styles
15 Issues in learning to teach EFL

Required reading:
– Crookes, G. (2003). A Practicum in TESOL: professional development through teaching practice. Cambridge: CUP. [selected chapters]
– Newby, D. et al (2008). European portfolio for student teachers of languages. Graz: ECML. [selected chapters]
– Wajnryb, R. (1992). Classroom observation tasks. Cambridge: CUP. [selected chapters]

Recommended reading:
– Allwright, D. (1988). Observation in the language classroom. New York: Longman. [selected chapters]
– Costas i Costa et al. (Eds.) (2001). Student teaching in Europe. Freiburg im Breisgau: Fillibach-Verl. [selected chapters]
– Gebhard, J.G. & Oprandy, R. (1999). Language teaching awareness. Cambridge: CUP. [selected chapters]

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Individual Differences in Language Acquisition

Course title: INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES IN LANGUAGE ACQUISITION
Instructors:
Professor Jelena Mihaljević Djigunović, PhD.
ECTS credits
: 3
Status
: elective
Semester
: IX
Enrollment requirements
: none
Course description
: Attitudes; motivation; language anxiety; learning styles; learning strategies; willingness to communicate; communication strategies; language learning aptitude; age; research into individual differences; dealing with individual differences.
Objectives
: Enable students to understand the concept of individual learner differences and recognise their impact in FL learning; develop competences for carrying out and reporting on small scale research in the field of individual differences; enable students to deal with individual differences in EFL teaching at different levels.
Students will develop competences for a flexible approach to teaching English to learners of different characteristics and in different teaching environments.
Course requirements
: Students will be expected to read the literature assigned by the course instructor. High level of participation, especially in seminars, is expected. Students who pass the three revision tests do not have to sit for the final oral exam.
Week by week schedule
:

Week Topics
1 Introduction; Key concepts
2 Successful and unsuccessful language learners
3 Researching individual differences
4 Attitudes and motivation
5 REVISION – Test 1
6 Language anxiety
7 Willingness to communicate
8 Learning styles and language learning strategies I
9 Learning styles and language learning strategies II
10 REVISION – Test 2
11 Age
12 Language aptitude
13 Communication strategies
14 Dealing with individual differences in the classroom
15 REVISION – Test 3

Required reading:
– Dörnyei, Z. (2005). The Psychology of the Language Learner: Individual Differences in Second Language Acquisition. Mahwah, N.J.: J. Erlbaum Associates. [selected chapters]
– Mihaljević Djigunović, J. (1998). Afektivni faktori u učenju stranoga jezika. Zagreb: Filozofski fakultet. [selected chapters]
– Arabski, J. & Wojtaszek, A. (Eds.) (2011). Individual learner differences in SLA. Bristol: Multilingual Matters. [selected chapters]

Recommended reading:
– Arnold, J. (1999). Affect in Language Learning. Cambridge: CUP.
– Mihaljević Djigunović, J. (2002). Strah od stranoga jezika – kako nastaje, kako se očituje i kako ga se osloboditi. Zagreb: Naklada Ljevak.
– Mihaljević Djigunović, J. & Bagarić, V. (2007). A comparative study of attitudes and motivation of Croatian learners of English and German, SRAZ, LII, 259-281.
– Mihaljević Djigunović, J. & Legac, V. (2008). Foreign language anxiety and listening comprehension of monolingual and bilingual EFL learners. SRAZ 53: 327-347.
– Mihaljević Djigunović, J. & Letica, S. (2009). Spremnost na komunikaciju i učenje stranoga jezika, Lingvistika javne komunikacije: Komunikacija u nastavi i komunikacijska gramatika (edited by Pavičić Takač, V. Bagarić, M Brdar & M. Omazić), Osijek: HDPL, 1-11.
– Skehan, P. (1989). Individual Differences in Second Language Learning. London: Edward Arnold.
– Articles from journals: Applied Linguistics; Language Learning; SRAZ; Strani jezici; Studies in Second Language Acquisition; TESOL Quarterly; System, International Review of Applied Linguistics.

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